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Roland Stone
02-22-09, 10:23 PM
Jimi's musical influences were diverse. Here's a place to post quotes, links and musical samples or just post your opinions.

I'll start with Lightnin' Hopkins. I hear Hopkins all over "Voodoo Chile". Jimi's signature guitar trills and Jimi's spacey blues timing seem to trace directly to Hopkins.

dino77
02-23-09, 07:13 AM
I'll pick the most obvious one, then - Bob Dylan!
The most obvious examples would be Wind Cries Mary and My Friend.
The lyrics to My Friend are typical of Dylan's freewheeling, obscure
acid-inspired writing from 65-67.

Roland Stone
02-23-09, 09:21 AM
Here's one of Jimi's more obscure influences. Perhaps the first time that Jimi heard "phlange phasing" was way back in 1959 on Miss Toni Fisher's "The Big Hurt".

In an interview Jimi gave to the Cleveland Plain Dealer in March 1968:
"Say, have you heard of a record called 'The Big Hurt?' It's old. By Toni Fisher I think but I don't know the label. All of the new techniques were used on that record without anyone knowing about it. I'd sure like to get that one."
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stplsd
02-23-09, 11:48 AM
How about Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley, Howin' Wolf, Albert King, BB King, Earl King - he actually recorded songs by all of these and was photographed posing with LP's By Wolf, Bo & Muddy as well as Dylan.

The Earth Blues
02-23-09, 07:34 PM
Buddy Guy. A lot of Jimi's stage presence comes from Buddy Guy, not to mention we have footage of Jimi recording Buddy Guy!!

And I think his tone on some recordings with Curtis Knight (Christmas Plus One) sounds a lot like Buddy Guy.

MourningStar
02-23-09, 07:48 PM
Lucille Hendrix was an influence.

susep73
02-23-09, 08:58 PM
Lucille Hendrix was an influence.

well said, esp. on tunes such as Angel, Gypsy Eyes, Hey Baby, and many more.

another: Elvis Presley, when Jimi was younger he saw him perform live in Seattle.

purple jim
02-26-09, 03:11 PM
Other influences:
Little Walter (listen to that wild soaring harmonica !).
Johnny Guitar Watson
Curtis Mayfield
The Beatles
Eric Clapton
Jeff Beck

univibs
02-26-09, 04:53 PM
Science fiction books, The war in Vietnam, Dreams (purple haze), Flights (a lot of his songs was written during flying), People (good and bad) - don't forget the Isle of wight pre show interview when asked "where do you get your inspiration?" and he said: "from the people", LSD, Freedom, Sex, Women, racism, and the list goes on and on.

when someone is asking who influenced Jimi, and people start to think about artists and records, they don't think the Jimi's way or a real musician way of thinking.
music is just a small stream of influence, what we experience every day is a Ocean of influences.

and in Jimi's case, you can hear it in each and every song.
desperation in "I Don't live today"
sex in "Foxy Lady"
racism in "House burning down"
and War in "Machine Gun"

the Who influenced Jimi changed to What influenced Jimi.

MourningStar
02-26-09, 07:39 PM
Science fiction books, The war in Vietnam, ...
...blah blah woof woof ...
...the Who influenced Jimi changed to What influenced Jimi.Yes, I think we all understand all that - we were not born yesterday you know. Ever stop to think that perhaps Roland is only interested in just "who"?


:rolleyes:

Olvator
02-27-09, 02:30 AM
Yes, I think we all understand all that - we were not born yesterday you know. Ever stop to think that perhaps Roland is only interested in just "who"?


:rolleyes:


come on....marcos. whatever roland was interested in....

dino77
02-27-09, 03:06 AM
Buddy Guy. A lot of Jimi's stage presence comes from Buddy Guy, not to mention we have footage of Jimi recording Buddy Guy!!

And I think his tone on some recordings with Curtis Knight (Christmas Plus One) sounds a lot like Buddy Guy.


Too help yet another thread from degererating into an argument
I would just like to say I agree. Jimi sounds a lot like Buddy on the Squires recordings. But better, of course :) . Buddy plays too many notes.

purple jim
02-27-09, 05:52 AM
Yeah, Jimi loved Buddy Guy.
Another big influence was his Cherokee grandmother, his Native American roots. You can feel the influences on his music is many songs, not just the obvious "Cherokee Mist" but also "I Dont Live Today", "Voodoo Child (Slight Return", "Gypsy Eyes", …

MourningStar
02-27-09, 09:25 AM
Pete Townsend influenced Jimi.

BURTCOBAIN
02-27-09, 11:14 AM
i was born yesterday . .and it feels fxxkin great so far . .and just to put things back into context . .although Jimi grubbed around the blues clubs scrounging a living in his early days etc etc . .the one thing that set his mind on fire was . .drum roll please . . rrrrrrrrrrrrrr ta da . .LSD !!! ov course we are moving ever forward into a mamby pamby pc world where one day we won't even be able to mention such things . .sad innit . .

'and eleven moons played across a rainbow above for me and you' . .say no more eh . .but without recreational drugs most ov the 60's artistic movement just would'nt of happened . .its as simple as that folks . .
hows that for an answer ??

and just as a footnote, when i was a young twat sharing my thoughts and dreams long ago, i used to get asked by some ov my mates . ."whats it like ? " (LSD) and i would very simply put 1983 (Merman ) on my record deck . .and say . ."it sorta sounds like this" . .

Roland Stone
02-27-09, 11:49 AM
I was more interested in specific instances of directly traceable musical or lyrical influences. For instance, the phrase "might even raise a little sand" from Voodoo Chile (SR) - I always thought that was a Jimi original, until I heard it in an early 60's R&B lyric (sorry I can't recall who it was right now but its on the "Rhino Big Box of Soul", Little Milton maybe?)

BURTCOBAIN
02-27-09, 01:10 PM
I was more interested in specific instances of directly traceable musical or lyrical influences. For instance, the phrase "might even raise a little sand" from Voodoo Chile (SR) - I always thought that was a Jimi original, until I heard it in an early 60's R&B lyric (sorry I can't recall who it was right now but its on the "Rhino Big Box of Soul", Little Milton maybe?)

yup point taken, i guess my reply was more ov a 'what' influenced Jimi's music as apposed to 'who' . .but i do think the (Acid) thing was a big turning point in his life . .all that talk about 'soundpainting' is a good example . .i think in his early days Jimi was probably influenced by so many transient musicians who simply wanted and needed to try and get on in life just like him . .a way out from a life ov hurt poverty and drudgery i guess . .i think Jimi soaked up everyone and anyone who struck a chord in his yearning to become noticed and apretiated . .as Pete Townshend put it so brilliantly in the film 'Jimi' he was unashamed and willing to play and jam with anyone . .and i think thats why his style became so eclectic and interesting, aint it a shame he never made it, i think Jimi was heading for much bigger things . .all he needed was some time off and the space to make that quatum leap into the next period ov his evolution . .
oops i'm on a ramble . .ok arms down head up and . .breath . .x

stplsd
02-27-09, 03:15 PM
"Raise sand" "raising sand" is nobody's specific "lyric" it's just an old expression meaning to cause a disturbance, get angry etc.

Roland Stone
02-27-09, 03:30 PM
There's a guitar lick in The Coaster's "I'm a Hog For You Baby" that I'm certain Jimi lifted from Barney Kessel. It's the sweet kind of pretty sounding guitar hook that comes right after The Coasters sing "Cause I'm a Hog For You Baby, I can't get enough of your love" and just before the next line "When I go to sleep at night you're the only one I'm dreaming of". I've heard Jimi use that same lick many times. I know he could have come up with it independently but I don't think I've heard another guitarist use it except for Shuggie Otis (and I think Shuggie was probably channeling Jimi when he used the lick near the end of "Ice Cold Daydream").

And we know Jimi was a Coasters fan because "Takin Care of No Business" is almost a direct lift of "D.W. Washburn"!

purple jim
02-27-09, 04:00 PM
And we know Jimi was a Coasters fan because "Takin Care of No Business" is almost a direct lift of "D.W. Washburn"!

I didn't know that ! Thanks for the info.

kcox5342
02-27-09, 05:04 PM
I'd like to add Richie Havens and Little Richard to the list.

Roland Stone
02-27-09, 07:17 PM
On second thought, not a "direct lift" but certainly a "direct descendant". Both songs have the same old-timey Salvation Army Band feel and we know Jimi wanted similar horns in his arrangement (I believe they were added posthumously) and they have almost identical subject matter, but "Takin Care of No Business" is written from the first person point of view, almost as if "D.W. Washburn" is singing about himself.

MourningStar
02-27-09, 07:39 PM
Among musicians of any instrument, it is quite common to come up with a 'riff', totally independently. As a drummer, I recall many 'licks' I incorporated into my playing, only to hear it done by another without ever hearing it by them. True also, that I have incorporated other's into my own (I fell in love with Mitch's snare-tom-cymbal runs from 'Manic Depression, one among others). Therefore, and do not anyone take any offense, I pay little heed to declarations that a specific phrase was 'lifted' or any other term one wishes to apply. Unless, of course, it is admitted to, as I have done.

purple jim
02-28-09, 02:42 AM
I suppose this calls for a list of the songs that Jimi covered. So definately the artists that influenced him:

- Hey Joe (Billy Roberts) and by Love, Byrds, Leaves and mosy impotantly Tim Rose
- Mercy Mercy - Don Covay
- Like A Rolling Stone, Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window, All Along The Watchtower, Drifter's Escape (Bob Dylan)
- Come On (Part One) (Earl King)
- Wild Thing (Chip Taylor) - The Troggs
- Gloria (Van Morrison) - Them
- Sunshine Of Your Love (Bruce/Brown/Clapton) - Cream
- Bleeding Heart (James/Sehorn) - Elmore James
- Catfish Blues (various sources)
- Drivin' South (Robert Petway) - Albert Collins
- Blue Suede Shoes (Carl Perkins)
- Johnny B. Goode (Chuck Berry)
- Summertime Blues (Eddie Cochran)
- Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band, Day tripper, Tomorrow Never Knows (Lennon/McCartney)
- Outside Woman Blues (Arthur Reynolds) - Cream
- Manish Boy (McKinley Morganfield = Muddy Waters)
- Rock Me Baby (BB King)
- Born Under A Bad Sign (Jones/Bell) and by Albert King, Cream
- l'm Your Hoochie Coochie Man (Willie Dixon) - Muddy Waters
- Travelling To California - Albert King
- San-Ho-Zay - Freddie King
- Hound Dog (Leiber/Stoller) - Elvis Presley
- Killing Floor (Chester Burnett = Howlin Wolf)
- Things That I Used To Do - Guitar Slim
- Further On Up The Road - Bobby Bland
- Stop (Ragovoy/Shuman) - Howard Tate
- Tax Free (Hanssen/Karlsson)
- Peter Gunne (Henry Mancini)
- Dear Mr Fantasy (Winwood/Capaldi/Wood =Traffic)
- Star Spangled Banner (John Stafford Smith)

Then there are the odd riffs that he would throw in:
- Strangers In The Night - Frank Sinatra
- Race With The Devil - Gun
- Rice Pudding - Jeff beck
- Satisfaction - The Rolling Stones
-…

univibs
02-28-09, 04:35 AM
Yes, I think we all understand all that - we were not born yesterday you know. Ever stop to think that perhaps Roland is only interested in just "who"?


:rolleyes:
there are important things that should be explained. if not, in ten years from now people will think that his major influences were other musicians... that's only half true.
:000-thanx:

MourningStar
02-28-09, 12:55 PM
there are important things that should be explained. if not, in ten years from now people will think that his major influences were other musicians... that's only half true.Good point. However, only Jimi can tell us whether it's "... half true". But, alas, Jimi has left the building.

hytag9
02-28-09, 01:29 PM
I suppose this calls for a list of the songs that Jimi covered. So definately the artists that influenced him:

- Hey Joe (Billy Roberts) and by Love, Byrds, Leaves and mosy impotantly Tim Rose
- Mercy Mercy - Don Covay
- Like A Rolling Stone, Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window, All Along The Watchtower, Drifter's Escape (Bob Dylan)
- Come On (Part One) (Earl King)
- Wild Thing (Chip Taylor) - The Troggs
- Gloria (Van Morrison) - Them
- Sunshine Of Your Love (Bruce/Brown/Clapton) - Cream
- Bleeding Heart (James/Sehorn) - Elmore James
- Catfish Blues (various sources)
- Drivin' South (Robert Petway) - Albert Collins
- Blue Suede Shoes (Carl Perkins)
- Johnny B. Goode (Chuck Berry)
- Summertime Blues (Eddie Cochran)
- Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band, Day tripper, Tomorrow Never Knows (Lennon/McCartney)
- Outside Woman Blues (Arthur Reynolds) - Cream
- Manish Boy (McKinley Morganfield = Muddy Waters)
- Rock Me Baby (BB King)
- Born Under A Bad Sign (Jones/Bell) and by Albert King, Cream
- l'm Your Hoochie Coochie Man (Willie Dixon) - Muddy Waters
- Travelling To California - Albert King
- San-Ho-Zay - Freddie King
- Hound Dog (Leiber/Stoller) - Elvis Presley
- Killing Floor (Chester Burnett = Howlin Wolf)
- Things That I Used To Do - Guitar Slim
- Further On Up The Road - Bobby Bland
- Stop (Ragovoy/Shuman) - Howard Tate
- Tax Free (Hanssen/Karlsson)
- Peter Gunne (Henry Mancini)
- Dear Mr Fantasy (Winwood/Capaldi/Wood =Traffic)
- Star Spangled Banner (John Stafford Smith)

Then there are the odd riffs that he would throw in:
- Strangers In The Night - Frank Sinatra
- Race With The Devil - Gun
- Rice Pudding - Jeff beck
- Satisfaction - The Rolling Stones
-…Jimi didn't cover a Sly Stone song but he admired Sly's music.

karsten
02-28-09, 01:41 PM
Jimi didn't cover a Sly Stone song but he admired Sly's music.

He did quote the riff from "sing a simple song"..

Roland Stone
02-28-09, 01:50 PM
I don't recall "Travelling to California" or "San-Ho-Zay" in the Hendrix discography. Can you point me to them?

And to the "odd riffs" section you can add "Hail to the Chief", The Beatles "I Feel Fine" and Cream's "Cat Squirrel".

stplsd
02-28-09, 07:14 PM
I don't recall "Travelling to California" or "San-Ho-Zay" in the Hendrix discography. Can you point me to them?

And to the "odd riffs" section you can add "Hail to the Chief", The Beatles "I Feel Fine" and Cream's "Cat Squirrel".

093. San Ho-Zay – Freddie King 1961
Billy Cox played (prominently) in the studio band that backed Freddie on his several performances for ‘The Beat!!!’ TV show. Jimi based a jam around this, with Al Kooper and some of Paul Butterfield’s band, at the Generation Club, in April 1968. Jimi can be heard saying: "Do you think we can do this one it’s in ‘G’?... Part of it’s in ‘A’, in ‘A’… Like, somethin’ like San-Ho-Zay, with the little breaks, an’ all that, you know, like Freddie King"

077. Travellin’ To California - Albert King 1960
Apart from the words ‘Everyday I Have The Blues’ (listen to 018) of the title being a line of the lyric this song bears very little resemblance to it. Albert K also recorded a version of 'Everyday…etc'. But this is a different song, an original composition. Albert K is remembered by Jimi’s Seattle band mates as being a big influence on him, also recorded by Jimmy (vocal) and “The Squires” [Curtis Knight?] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

In return could you please tell me where Jimi plays "Hail the Chief"

stplsd
02-28-09, 07:23 PM
Bleeding Heart (James/Sehorn) - Elmore James
Catfish Blues (various sources)
Drivin' South (Robert Petway) - Albert Collins
Manish Boy (McKinley Morganfield = Muddy Waters)

Race With The Devil - Gun
Rice Pudding - Jeff beck
-…

Thanks for this nice post. It raises a couple of points as well. Bleeding Heart I do believe was written by just Elmore James himself, the Sehorn bit being just a commonly used ploy to claim royalties for the producer (in this case Marshall S) or some business associate. "Drivin' South" (see 'Thaw Out' below) was not written by Robert Petway, this is a mix up for 'Catfish Blues' (see below)although Petway cannot be considered the composer of this either as his 'Catfish' song is only one of several others, and only has some resemblance to Muddy Waters' 'Rolling Stone' or Jimi's Catfish Blues (Sometimes known incorrectly as 'Experiencing the Blues' [title given to it on BBC Radio 1 by DJ Tommy Vance] Jimi only ever called it 'Catfish Blues'
Also the oft quoted "Race With the Devil" the "experts" tell us, on comparison with the original, only bears the most superficial similarity, and on comparing them myself I would agree, have a listen and see.

006. Rollin’ Stone – ‘Muddy Waters’ 1950
This song is highly derivative of several earlier songs (some using ‘Catfish’ in the title, others not) by different artists, as are a lot of ‘original’ ‘Blues’ songs, Jimi lifted the first two verses of this (verbatim) for his ‘Catfish Blues’ – which he occasionally mentioned on stage as being “Slightly Muddy Waters” or something in a similar vein. Jimi: “When I first started, I was digging […] Muddy Waters […]”<O></O>
<O></O>

007. Still A Fool (inaccurately aka “Two Trains Running”) – ‘Muddy Waters’ 1951
Jimi lifted the first verse of this (verbatim) for the third verse of his ‘Catfish Blues’ see above.

128. Thaw Out - Albert Collins 1965
Jimmy re-arranged this (very slightly) and re-titled it Drivin’ South (see 096. Stranger Blues ) Also recorded with Curtis Knight (a very short, ad-libbed? verse at the beginning, followed by just a list of towns in The South) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966). JHE recorded three different versions of this for the BBC in 1967, Jimi also played it in concert and used it in jams several times.

016. I’m A Man – ‘Bo Diddley’ 1955
A #1 (R&B) hit, a double ‘A’ sided single b/w Bo Diddley (Checker 814). Also a hit for The Yardbirds in the US in 1965. Bo’s songs are remembered by Jimmy’s Seattle band-mates as being part of their repertoire. Jimmy also had himself photographed for his girlfriend Betty Jean Morgan, in his army barracks wearing a very ‘loud’ loose fitting shirt, with the neck opened wide, and in a wild pose with his red guitar emblazoned with his girlfriend’s ‘Betty Jean’ logo in very heavily styled lettering, next to a prominently displayed LP cover of ‘Bo Diddley’s A Gunslinger’ – an appropriate title for his present circumstances. With this cover and title Bo really romanticised Jimi’s chosen profession - “R&B” guitarist/singer (or was that guitar slinger) / songwriter and innovator. It must have made an impression on Jimmy that one of the two reigning “Blues” kings at Chess and one of Jimmy’s early influences - Muddy Waters had released a very close “answer” version of this song, in humorous put-down fashion, thereby acknowledging the importance of Bo’s individual style.
Jimmy recorded two versions of this with some additional lyrics from Muddy’s ‘Manish Boy’ version, with Jimmy (vocal) and “The Squires” [Curtis Knight?] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966) One of these has no less than three added verses (including the “Two Old Maids” one from his later version of “Stoop Down, Baby” possibly written by Chick Willis, Chick released two versions of this one in 1972 (when it became a 'jukebox' hit) He also recorded multiple takes of this Bo/Muddy mix at the Record Plant with Buddy & Billy

018. Manish [sic] Boy – ‘Muddy Waters’ 1955
A hit for Muddy. [See 015 ‘I’m A Man’]. He takes Bo’s original and uses it humorously to put the ‘new kid’ at Chess in his place, letting him know that Muddy is the “M. A. child [listen] N. that relevent me” he then spells it out “No B. O. [Bo] child [you are] Y” (turning Bo’s name into ‘boy’) “That spell manish boy” (i.e. not quite a man yet) – “But …I’m a hoochie coochie man”

Please could you tell me where I might hear the "Rice Pudding" quote?

Roland Stone
02-28-09, 09:50 PM
"Hail to the Chief" is also one of the quotes Jimi would slip in near the end of "Hey Joe" but I'll have to think a while before I can recall exactly which show you'll hear it in. Maybe someone else will remember before I do.

"Rice Pudding" is the ending of "In From the Storm".

bluesman905
02-28-09, 10:23 PM
Just did a quick look through the post's but just in case they were not mentioned, Albert King, Elmore James, Big Bill Broonzy

stplsd
02-28-09, 10:24 PM
Many thanks, if you do remember the 'Chief 'bit please give us a shout as I'm not familiar with this tune

Roland Stone
03-01-09, 01:14 AM
Another quote used several times in 1970 shows: Ernesto Lecuona's "The Breeze & I". I think it shows up in "Machine Gun" in Berlin and "Spanish Castle Magic" in Copenhagen and in some other places too. The song dates back to the 40's and has been covered countless times, but it's possible Jimi got it from the 60's surf group "The Challengers".

stplsd
03-01-09, 03:28 AM
Another quote used several times in 1970 shows: Ernesto Lecuona's "The Breeze & I". I think it shows up in "Machine Gun" in Berlin and "Spanish Castle Magic" in Copenhagen and in some other places too. The song dates back to the 40's and has been covered countless times, but it's possible Jimi got it from the 60's surf group "The Challengers".

Thanks for the Challengers info. Jimi also quoted this during Spanish Castle Magic at Milwaukee in 1970. It was also released by 'Santo & Johnny' in 1959, a strange instrumental duo featuring an unusual electric steel guitar and ordinary electric guitar combination. They had a big hit with 'Sleep Walk' earlier. But then it could have been just about any of these, I was searching the challengers for a release date, didn't realise how popular it was until now ha-ha:
101 Strings Orchestra, <R>Gene Ammons, <R>Art Blakey, <R>Willie Bobo, <R>Martin Böttcher</R> with <R>Siegfried Schwab</R> (guitar) - album "Moonlight Guitar", The Challengers, <R>Sonny Clark</R>
<R>Xavier Cugat</R> (charted), <R>Vic Damone</R> (charted), <R>Plácido Domingo, <R>Jimmy Dorsey charted), <R>Tommy Dorsey, <R>Bob Eberly, <R>Teddy Edwards</R>/<R>Houston Person, <R>Esquivel, <R>Morton Gould, <R>Percy Faith, <R>The Flamingos, <R>The Four Freshmen, <R>Connie Francis, <R>Barry Harris, <R>Coleman Hawkins, <R>Dick Haymes, <R>Willis Jackson (saxophonist)</R>/<R>Pat Martino, <R>Bert Kaempfert, Wardia Kako, 1950's, in Eastern Assyrian Katzenjammers Steelband ("Steelband WIth Velvet Gloves" - Cook 1047 rec. 1957), <R>Paul Lavalle, <R>Jeanette MacDonald, <R>Charles Magnante, <R>Henry Mancini, <R>Shelly Manne, <R>Mantovani, Wes Montgomery, <R>Joe Pass, <R>Jimmy Rowles, <R>Santo & Johnny, <R>The Shadows, <R>Dinah Shore, <R>The Tornados, <R>Caterina Valente</R> (charted), <R>The Ventures, <R>Lawrence Welk, <R>Klaus Wunderlich.

stplsd
03-01-09, 03:52 AM
068. Machine Gun - The Riptides 1959
A surf instrumental and Billboard chart entry not mentioned by anyone, interesting? I think so. Bog’s reheasals (where Machine Gun was eventually defined) Jimi and Buddy: “And you’ll never hear surf music again ha-ha-ha”

After the 1967 session which ends with Jimi's spoken "Then youl'll never hear surf Music again" he says "That sounds like a lie to me" and Chas bursts out laughing.

stplsd
03-01-09, 04:19 AM
the Who influenced Jimi changed to What influenced Jimi.

Yes, it's nice "to sometimes turn it around", people can forget that it wasn't just other peoples music that influenced Jimi.

Roland Stone
03-01-09, 06:52 PM
I fell asleep last night while trying to find the "Hail to the Chief" quote. I must have listened to a dozen "Hey Joe"s before I nodded off As I recall it's pretty well recorded in good sound quality, which made me think Winterland, L.A. or San Diego, but it wasn't any of those. Nor was it Berlin, Boston, Madison, Copenhagen Munster or Vienna.

I think its probably from 69, possibly from 70 and its possibly the same version where he also quotes "Satisfaction" but I couldn't find that one either. Does anyone remember which "Hey Joe" it is where he quotes "Satisfaction"?

yelapavision
03-02-09, 12:35 AM
Love those odd riffs! A couple more:

Theme from Bonanza (Winterland 10-11-68 1st show)
Speedy Razors theme (i think that's what it is) (1-9-69 1st show)

anyone know more?

Then there are the odd riffs that he would throw in:
- Strangers In The Night - Frank Sinatra
- Race With The Devil - Gun
- Rice Pudding - Jeff beck
- Satisfaction - The Rolling Stones
-…[/quote]

purple jim
03-02-09, 12:57 AM
"Travelling To California" is also listed as "California Night" and it was recorded during those Curtis Knight Georges Club recordings. There are two recorded versions of the song.

stplsd
03-02-09, 11:44 PM
"Travelling To California" is also listed as "California Night" and it was recorded during those Curtis Knight Georges Club recordings. There are two recorded versions of the song.

Yes indeed it is, I forgot to mention it. “California 'Night' (ie 'Knight' geddit;-)” it would appear is a bogus title used to claim undeserved royalties by “certain people”. The actual title is “Travelling To California” and was written, recorded and released by Albert King,

<O></O>The “Georges Club” intro’s are misleading as they were recorded in a studio and later dubbed on to studio recordings, most of which have had bogus “crowd” noises dubbed on as well as other instruments. None of these on close inspection are actually “live in concert” they may be “live” in a studio with what sounds just like a few band members shouting encouragemen and/or insults etc, but they all have dubbed on “crowd” usually, originally, consisting of just a few men, some have the occasional women or two commenting or arguing with each other along with the men (possibly a recording of people in the bar at Georges Club? or elsewhere.) to this has sometimes been added totally bogus applause and stereo overdubbed instruments to the mono tracks – which were probably stereo originally, as some of them appear in stereo as well. This is nothing new, The Stones had bogus live tracks on Got Live If You Want It, so did chuck Berry a whole Lp, Jimi had My Friend & Voodoo Chile , Beatles Sgt Peppers etc. etc. It does appear that at least some, of the tracks were recorded in December 65/January 66 though, as this is when some of the originals first entered the <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 /><st1:country-region>US</st1:country-region> charts.

stplsd
03-02-09, 11:54 PM
". Does anyone remember which "Hey Joe" it is where he quotes "Satisfaction"?

its at Isle of Wight, he also quotes it during Fire at Randall's Island

stplsd
03-03-09, 12:15 AM
Love those odd riffs! A couple more:

Theme from Bonanza (Winterland 10-11-68 1st show)
Speedy Razors theme (i think that's what it is) (1-9-69 1st show)
anyone know more?

-…[/quote]

Before the last chorus of Freedom at Berkeley 1st show:

[Instrumental break featuring Pete Moore’s (UK) ‘Pearl & Dean’ cinema advertising theme ‘Asteroid’ (Pete Moore)

He also quotes Bonaza again at the last Winterland show:


8. THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER (music: ‘The Anacreontic Song’ by John Stafford Smith)
<O></O>
Jimi : Wait
<O></O>
[Quotes theme from ‘BONANZA’ TV show (by Jay Livingston & Ray Evans) original guitar solo by Tommy Tedesco – “The most recorded guitarist in history”]
….

What is the 'Speedy Razors' theme please?

purple jim
03-03-09, 01:13 AM
To come back to what you said STPLSD, I wouldn't call "My Friend" and The Beatles "Sgt. Pepper's" bogus live tracks. The audience or club noise was added to created a certain "picturesque" effect. As for "Voodoo Chile", I imagine Jimi's entourage were present at one point during the recordings and Jimi decided to keep their applause in. Were are getting off subject here !

stplsd
03-03-09, 07:43 AM
Well, I feel it’s very pertinent & also interesting that Jimi added bogus “live” effects to both his earlier and later recordings, as this was a feature of several of the songs that Jimi later covered eg ‘Land of a 1000 Dances’ . As to what the reasons for this were in in the case of the PPX recordings, is anyone’s guess. Obviously the reason in the later cases Voodoo etc. was to “create a certain "picturesque" effect.” One could argue that in the case of some of the PPX stuff too, as it’s often of a similar nature to ‘My Friend’, and there is no actual evidence that it was anyones intent to pass these off as genuine “live” recordings, at that time.
<o></o>

The “audience” on Voooo was recorded after the music session, it’s well documented and there are recordings with Jimi telling Eddie that he’s missed the place in the playback when they’re adding the “audience” overdubs. The effect was done so well, that many believed, and some still do, that the “live” audience was there when it was recorded, so it certainly worked. I still "believe" it when I listen to it, even though I know otherwise.
<o></o>

There’s also Hear My Train from the BBC 1967

Roland Stone
03-03-09, 09:50 PM
Continuing the off-topic discussion ;> You could say "My Friend", "STP/LSD", "Voodoo Child" and "Calling All Devil's Children" all feature "Party Audience in the Studio" as another color in Jimi's instrumental pallette. Any others?

dino77
03-04-09, 01:37 AM
Continuing the off-topic discussion ;> You could say "My Friend", "STP/LSD", "Voodoo Child" and "Calling All Devil's Children" all feature "Party Audience in the Studio" as another color in Jimi's instrumental pallette. Any others?

"Taking care of No Business" from Olympic :). Has a bartender and a drunk.

stplsd
03-04-09, 05:50 AM
^
Ha-ha-ha, cheers!

yelapavision
03-04-09, 06:54 PM
What is the 'Speedy Razors' theme please?[/QUOTE]

Right at the beginning of the 1-9-69 1st show, that unique riff. It's from a TV commercial for some brand of razor blades (at least that's what I remember someone saying about it).

yelapavision
03-04-09, 06:55 PM
Beatles watching Jimi

DaveOwens
03-04-09, 10:50 PM
amazing player and the only one who is worth listening to .

Joun
03-14-09, 05:29 AM
As already mentioned, Elvis was an influence to Jimi. For being an admirer of both, I found it extremely cool that Jimi saw him live. At the time, 14 years old, Jimi saw Elvis' show at Seattle's Sicks' Stadium... as we all know, Jimi himself would later perform on the very same stage. ... Elvis' shows were phenomenal in 1957, so it must've made quite an impression to young Jimi ....... for the curious, below a couple of pictures taken during the actual show (September 1, 1957 - Seattle) ..... and not to go completely 'off', also attached is the drawing Hendrix made of Elvis.

...If my memory serves me correct, Jimi also attended a late-night screening of one of Elvis' movies, "King Creole", while in Paris in 1968....?

stplsd
03-15-09, 05:26 AM
Saturday 13 June 1970 Baltimore Civic Centre

At the end of GETTING MY HEART BACK TOGETHER Jimi Plays the riff of Fleetwood Mac’s ‘OH, WELL’

dino77
03-15-09, 06:26 AM
Saturday 13 June 1970 Baltimore Civic Centre

At the end of GETTING MY HEART BACK TOGETHER Jimi Plays the riff of Fleetwood Mac’s ‘OH, WELL’


Yes, and in Spanish Castle Magic from Berlin 04 Sep 1970, I think.
Hendrix was a massive Peter Green fan.

purple jim
03-29-09, 04:59 AM
I can't remember if it is IOW or Atlanta, but at one point Jimi does subtle little reference to a Spirit song. Does that ring a bell with anyone ?

stplsd
04-01-09, 12:28 PM
Another big influence was his Cherokee grandmother, his Native American roots. You can feel the influences on his music is many songs, not just the obvious "Cherokee Mist" but also "I Dont Live Today", "Voodoo Child (Slight Return", "Gypsy Eyes", …

He does appear to have been inspired by his Native American ancestry, but his paternal grandmother was only part Cherokee, through her father whose mother was Cherokee, but his father was Irish. The stuff about her being an 'Indian' and living on a reservation was just an exaggeration as part of his early publicity which unfortunately has been repeated until it's become a factoid". According to Cross Jimi's maternal grandmother was also of Cherokee ancestry. There can be no Cherokee "princesses" as there was no Cherokee "Royalty" Native Americans had no concept of hereditary rulers. Interestingly many Cherokee were slave owners.

stplsd
04-04-09, 09:09 AM
Removed my bit about Chick Willis as it not as clear as I thought - got some mistaken release dates - about the source for Jimi's versions of 'Stoop Down Baby' (aka 'Two Old Maids')

stplsd
04-04-09, 09:11 AM
Hendrix was a massive Peter Green fan.

He may have liked him, but surely this is wildly overstating the case?

stplsd
04-04-09, 09:14 AM
Other influences:
Johnny Guitar Watson


I'm interested to know why you think JGW was an influence?

purple jim
04-05-09, 02:15 AM
It was Stevie Ray Vaughan who underlined that. I read it in a Guitar World special. Stevie was enthusing about Watson's "Space Guitar" which was pretty far out for its time in terms of guitar techniques, sound effects and distorsion.

stplsd
04-05-09, 03:27 AM
^
Thanks, must have a listen

stplsd
04-05-09, 04:04 AM
^
Wow, 1954, much of this is just like listening to Jimi's "Curtis Knight" period, and exactly the same 'talking guitar', that he used throughout his career

stplsd
04-05-09, 04:32 AM
On second thought, not a "direct lift" but certainly a "direct descendant". Both songs have the same old-timey Salvation Army Band feel and we know Jimi wanted similar horns in his arrangement (I believe they were added posthumously) and they have almost identical subject matter, but "Takin Care of No Business" is written from the first person point of view, almost as if "D.W. Washburn" is singing about himself.

Very little similarity at all really IMHO. How do we know Jimi wanted horns? his vocal horns sound finished to me. There were many English pop tunes around at this time that used that old time, brass band, nostalgia sound 'Winchester Cathedral' for one?

This will be taken in the spirit of a discussion I hope?

souldoggie
04-05-09, 05:43 AM
Right after Jimi died, that fall I bought everything I could get my hands on that I didn't already own and I got an import LP featuring the George's Club 20 recording with "Driving South" and thought that it was a great track. I just started playing guitar back then and I was always doing my best to play that riff. Then years later I heard that the song was actually a cover of an Albert Collins track "Defrost". I tracked down that 45 and for years I thought that this was the original that Jimi covered. "Defrost" does have a variation of the riff that Jimi plays on "Driving South". But then a few years later I got a hold of Albert's "Thaw Out" 45 and was amazed. There it was, Jimi's "Driving South", a direct lift and copy of Albert's "Thaw Out". A few years later (late 1970's) I got the chance to see Albert Collins live at the Walnut Hills Bar in Dayton, Ohio, which is where I met him and he signed the back of a flyer for me. That's me, "Dave" aka "Souldoggie". I show two "Thaw Out" 45's, the white label promo copy depicts the "B" side, "Backstroke". Also shown is the Albert Collins instrumental "Dyin' Flu" b/w "Hot 'n Cold" credited to "The Cool Sound Of Albert Collins".
http://i713.photobucket.com/albums/ww136/souldoggie/DSC01159.jpg
http://i713.photobucket.com/albums/ww136/souldoggie/DSC01160.jpghttp://i713.photobucket.com/albums/ww136/souldoggie/DSC01158.jpg

stplsd
04-05-09, 06:17 AM
Yeah, it's outrageous, Curtis Knight got the royalties from this, did Albert Collins know this, If I owned the song publishing for 'Thaw Out' I'd sue someone's arse, must be worth a fortune in back royalties. There's also the question of Albert King's 'Travellin' To California', which had it's title changed to "California Night" (Knight geddit?) Curtis getting the royalties for that, publisher? you guessed it Ed Chalpin's PPX. there are other songs similarly treated in this manner. I would say there's a nice opportunity for someone wanting to take Ed to the cleaners as well.

dino77
04-05-09, 07:01 AM
He may have liked him, but surely this is wildly overstating the case?

Well probably as much as he liked Clapton or Beck. Semantics. Mick Fleetwood has talked about this. If anyone here is unfamiliar with Green's late 60's work, you should check it out. Great voice, astonishing playing, fantastic songs. Another "Oh well" quote is at the very beginning at the first BOG show 31/12/69.

souldoggie
04-05-09, 07:05 AM
Speaking about publishing....check it out, radio station stamped date "May 4, 1968" on Capitol Records no less. Our good friend Ed was going for the whole song catalog by the looks of this. LOL.
http://i713.photobucket.com/albums/ww136/souldoggie/DSC01165.jpg

dino77
04-05-09, 07:08 AM
What? Chalpin tried to claim publishing rights for "Fire"???

souldoggie
04-05-09, 07:11 AM
Yup dino77, you got it. In 1968 no less. Amazing.

souldoggie
04-05-09, 07:13 AM
The Pack found greater success a year or two later when they changed their name to Grand Funk Railroad.

stplsd
04-05-09, 07:29 AM
Well probably as much as he liked Clapton or Beck. Semantics. Mick Fleetwood has talked about this. If anyone here is unfamiliar with Green's late 60's work, you should check it out. Great voice, astonishing playing, fantastic songs.

I would agree with you that Green deserves to be up there with Beck & Clapton, prior to his breakdown. and I'm sure I've read a quote by Jimi on his liking for Green (which he obviously had).

souldoggie
04-05-09, 07:42 AM
Yes sir, it's the same song alright. Starting out with the lyric "Now dig this...." I don't think anyone would confuse the two songs though...this one has some pretty cheesey organ going on and the guitar player sounds, how should I put this....lame? Another way you can tell the difference between Jimi's and The Pack's is when the lead vocalist sings...."now move over Rover and let Mikey take over."

voodoo_child58
04-05-09, 07:43 AM
Check these:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmLWe-rf24o

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyAX6i6u9Uk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxcMitAywF4&feature=PlayList&p=0D4F3A6EB90B510A&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=3

stplsd
04-05-09, 07:51 AM
Speaking about publishing....check it out, radio station stamped date "May 4, 1968" on Capitol Records no less. Our good friend Ed was going for the whole song catalog by the looks of this. LOL.


That is some amazing stuff you've got, unbelievable

stplsd
04-05-09, 08:14 AM
Check these:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmLWe-rf24o

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyAX6i6u9Uk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxcMitAywF4&feature=PlayList&p=0D4F3A6EB90B510A&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=3

Brilliant, thanks so much

Roland Stone
04-05-09, 06:34 PM
Excellent clips about Jimi's Nashvile days. Thank you!

dino77
04-05-09, 11:29 PM
Yep, thank you! Really interesting.
Kind of amusing that they played mostly fake "pre-experience" stuff in the King Kasuals doc.

souldoggie
04-06-09, 07:35 AM
Produced by the great Stax artist, William Bell.

http://i713.photobucket.com/albums/ww136/souldoggie/DSC01166.jpg

stplsd
04-09-09, 10:44 AM
Jimi: “But, like, we’-we’re tryin’ to cover, you know. Just like anybody who’s, who’s hungry, you know what I mean by that - is young and want’s to do this and that - you know, and wants to get into music, so anybody like that, they got to go into so many different bags, and they got to, so much to be influenced by so many different things, the whole World, hmm.”

stplsd
04-09-09, 10:56 AM
Did anyone manage to get the two newspaper cuttings from the 'Night Train to Nashville' exhibition? a while back. They were on their website but my computer went down and by the time I'd got it sorted they'd taken them down: They were both for clubs/bars in Printer's Alley I think. One was for Billy Cox can't remember that one and the other was for 'Jimmy Hendrix and his magic guitar', if I remember rightly. Would make a nice contribution if anyone can get them?

Also this facinating discussion:

July 241 p.m. “Marbles and his Magic Guitar: Jimi Hendrix in Nashville” Panel Discussion. Hendrix moved to Music City in 1962 and played here after completing military service at nearby Fort Campbell, Kentucky. This panel will discuss Hendrix and his participation in the Nashville R&B scene. Panelists include Teddy Acklen Jr., Billy Cox, Marion James and Johnny Jones.

- anyone tape it?

stplsd
04-10-09, 06:52 PM
^
just found the info in Sharon Lawrence book, it was a newspaper advert for (loaned to the exhibition by Frank Howard of the Commanders who Jimmy and Billy both played and recorded for) 'The Jolly Roger' in Printer's Alley, Nashville "featuring BILLY COX and the SANDPIPERS
Also JIMMY HENDRIX AND HIS MAGIC GUITAR"

stplsd
04-17-09, 02:49 PM
'So Many Roads' John Hammond's 1965 LP featuring 3 members of The Hawks' the phenominal lead guitar is by Robbie Robertson, piano is by Michael Bloomfield. This Lp may well have been what decided Bob Dylan to use them as his backing group. This must have made some impression on Jimi. His group 'the Blue Flame' also played together with John Hammond in 1966, the two weeks just prior to his departure to the UK.

purple jim
04-17-09, 03:05 PM
Exactly. When they played together they collectively adopted the name The Screaming Night Hawks (although a press ad. of the time reveals that they were billed as John Hammond & The Blue Flames).

stplsd
04-18-09, 09:53 AM
Exactly. When they played together they collectively adopted the name The Screaming Night Hawks (although a press ad. of the time reveals that they were billed as John Hammond & The Blue Flames).

I think you'll find If you look again that the only advert (Village Voice) says John Hammond and 'the Blue Flame', as both John Hammond and also Jimi Hendrix refer to the group in interviews. The Jimmy James & 'the Blue Flames' name only appears in later interviews after Randy California uses this name. 'Jimmy James' was not so much a stage name as it was an alias, as was the earlier 'Maurice James'.
They may have refered to themselves as 'the Screaming Night Hawks' but the only evidence for this amusing title (a reference to the Screaming Eagles?) is Hammond's late interview.

stplsd
04-18-09, 09:20 PM
""Rice Pudding" is the ending of "In From the Storm".

So it is, thanks Roland

stplsd
04-18-09, 09:25 PM
I'll start with Lightnin' Hopkins. I hear Hopkins all over "Voodoo Chile". Jimi's signature guitar trills and Jimi's spacey blues timing seem to trace directly to Hopkins.

Not familiar with Hopkins, can you suggest some tracks of his that may have influenced Hendrix to some degree, please?

stplsd
04-23-09, 03:51 AM
Jimi quotes lyrics from the Rolling Stones' 'What A Shame': "Wake up this morning and find youself dead" during the blues jam at the Scene club in 1968 and during the Room Full Of Mirrors jam in Toronto in 1969

Nonhuman
04-23-09, 09:54 AM
I'd be interested to know what philosophers specifically influenced Jimi and why.

Does anyone know any verifiable quotes from Jimi himself identifying any philosophers he appreciated or criticized?

purple jim
04-23-09, 11:21 AM
I don't believe Jimi ever read any philosphy.
How about Timothy Leary ? He was a contempory of Jimi's and he certainly voiced off about the meaning of it all.

Nonhuman
04-23-09, 12:33 PM
Did Jimi ever use the word philosophy? Derrick Jensen wrote in his book "Endgame The Problem With Civilization" that all writers are propogandists (including those that write Dictionaries). Given Jimi's 1983, A Merman I Should Turn To Be, Jimi was clearly influenced by philosophy and expressing himself very eloquently regarding the fallacy and herd mentality of the human. It doesn't seem reasonable to me that he didn't at least read Plato or Aristotle.

I've never taken interest in Leary. I've used LSD and most every non-intravenous drug prior to 1979 and lived straight ever since. I'm inclined to dismiss entirely the claims of any productive influence of any drug upon music. What philosophy did Leary espouse and perhaps share with Jimi?

As the answers to the question(s) "what if", and "If only" can only be answered with lies due to the complete unknown of what might have been without drugs, it remains to my life experiences that resistance to the present moment causes only suffering. I abstain from all drugs and embrace the present moment, even though I live in chronic pain. I've always held pity for Timoth Leary, and the cripples his agenda left upon the roads winding through the past. Where many of them still seek to live out their "time" in semi-consciousness.

Jimi didn't need LSD, nobody did or does. Not even Timothy Leary. However everyone needs a valid philosophy. Yet it certainly isn't necessary to read about philosophy. The truth is all that matters.

stplsd
04-23-09, 05:04 PM
Why should Jimi - or anyone else for that matter - not arrive independently at the same conclusions as any particular philosopher. Why would he have to read about it? Nobody "needs" LSD, they take it beause they have heard of others experiences and want to try it. You cannot judge other peoples experience, as you haven't experienced it. "One man's meat is another man's poison" as an old saying goes. Just because you found acid etc. uninspiring, doesn't mean anything.

Nonhuman
04-23-09, 05:16 PM
stplsd,

That mirrors my thought exactly. Taking LSD eliminates the optional experience of never having taken it. Anyone that has taken it has eliminated the option of qualifying the alternative outcome of avoiding it.

He who knows does not speak. He who speaks does not know. - Lao-tzu

63strat
04-24-09, 01:40 AM
Someone mentioned it earlier but I thought I'd re-iterate the influence of Wes Montgomery. Clearly the octave playing was a huge influence and we wouldn't have Third stone the way it is without it. Or the solo in Purple Haze later on.
Also didn't he play part of Red House with a drumstick at one point and is this from any influences? Any one know?

BTW...the King Casuals stuff just blew my mind. I had no idea. And they jammed right here in my own state, Tn.Pretty cool and makes want a gig down in Nashville just to say I'm playing in Jimi's tracks. Would like to Jam with Johnny Jones. That'd be a blast

:bananasmile:

stplsd
04-24-09, 10:02 AM
stplsd,

That mirrors my thought exactly. Taking LSD eliminates the optional experience of never having taken it. Anyone that has taken it has eliminated the option of qualifying the alternative outcome of avoiding it.

He who knows does not speak. He who speaks does not know. - Lao-tzu

There is no "optional experience of not taking" anything, not doing something is not an 'experience', it's just not doing something, life unaffected - nothing to report.

stplsd
04-24-09, 10:22 AM
BTW...the King Casuals stuff just blew my mind. I had no idea. And they jammed right here in my own state, Tn.Pretty cool and makes want a gig down in Nashville just to say I'm playing in Jimi's tracks. Would like to Jam with Johnny Jones. That'd be a blast
:bananasmile:

I you are really interested, how about checking out the press archives of the Clarksville/ Nashville area for gig adverts between 62 & 65 for 'Jimmy Hendrix', 'Billy Cox', 'the Casuals', 'the King Casuals', 'the Bonnevilles', 'Little Richard' 'The Imperials' etc. I'm sure there's plenty of adverts in local papers from that time and it would fill a larg gap in Jimi's history. And stick it up here so we can all see. There's masses of stuff from the UK available and quite a lot from the US (but mainly only from 1968 on), stuff from the US that's earlier than 68 is hard to find on the net. A good start would be the Night Train To Nashville exhibition of a couple of years ago which featured a newspaper ad for 'Billy Cox and the Sandpipers' also 'Jimmy Hendrix and his Magic Guitar' playing at the 'Jolly Roger' in Printers Alley. Any US adverts, articles, photos etc from 62 to January 68 would be most welcome. I've included what I could find from the early '60s, in the thread: All the other stuff> everything Else>
Newspaper & Magazine Articles (Text Only) - 1960's-1970's (http://crosstowntorrents.org/showthread.php?t=1403)
. Well, just the first couple of months, hopefully someone else will add some missing stuff and I'll add more in return?

Nonhuman
04-24-09, 04:17 PM
There is no "optional experience of not taking" anything, not doing something is not an 'experience', it's just not doing something, life unaffected - nothing to report.


Abstaining from LSD does not relegate an individual to an absence of stimuli.

"If you do not change direction, you may end up where you are heading." - Lao-tzu

"Be Content with what you have; rejoice in the way things are. When you realize there is nothing lacking, the whole world belongs to you." - Lao-tzu

Nonhuman

Nonhuman
04-24-09, 04:49 PM
Who influenced Jimi regarding the "Axis Bold As Love" LP cover?

Nonhuman

stplsd
04-24-09, 05:32 PM
Abstaining from LSD does not relegate an individual to an absence of stimuli.

I never said that it did.


"If you do not change direction, you may end up where you are heading." - Lao-tzu

Yeah, whatever


"Be Content with what you have; rejoice in the way things are. When you realize there is nothing lacking, the whole world belongs to you." - Lao-tzu
Nonhuman

Yeah, just accept the facist boot stamping on your face forever...

stplsd
04-24-09, 06:33 PM
Who influenced Jimi regarding the "Axis Bold As Love" LP cover?

Nonhuman

No one, as he had nothing to do with it, it was entirely a creation of the Track records art department who were just following the trendy Beatles "Indian" thing. Jimi commented that he would have liked it better if they had been portrayed as American "Indians" as per the famous (and almost priceless) Haphash and the Coloured Coat Poster.
<!-- / message -->
<!-- controls -->http://crosstowntorrents.org/images/misc/progress.gif

stplsd
04-25-09, 03:54 AM
He who knows does not speak. He who speaks does not know. - Lao-tzu

Ha-ha-ha! thanks for this, what a wacky sense of humour Mr Lao's got. Nudge, nudge, wink, wink.

purple jim
04-25-09, 05:40 AM
Who influenced Jimi regarding the "Axis Bold As Love" LP cover? Nonhuman

Here is what I put up on my site :
"After Peter Blake's revolutionary cover for The Beatles "Sergent Pepper's Lonely Hearts Band", just about every other band made pains to present their work in similarly rich packaging. "Satanic Majesties Request" (Stones), "Disreali Gears" (Cream), "The Grateful Dead" ,… all followed suit and The Experience were no exception. Here, the designers David King and Roger Law inserted the band's portraits into a lavish Indian mythological painting with Jimi as the central guru."

Nonhuman
04-25-09, 06:34 AM
purple jim,

The Axis cover was certainly lavish. I remember I didn't care for it, but not for any particular reason. I'm grateful that the music pleased me more than "Their Satanic Magesties Request". I struggle to appreciate that one today. I'll check out your site sometime if it's listed in your profile.

May your days be filled with music!

Nonhuman

Nonhuman
04-25-09, 06:40 AM
Ha-ha-ha! thanks for this, what a wacky sense of humour Mr Lao's got. Nudge, nudge, wink, wink.

Good morning stplsd,

Ha ha! I dig Monty Python, never mind my silly walk. Have a joyous day!

Nonhuman

“When the highest type of men hear Tao, They diligently practice it. When the average type of men hear Tao, They half believe in it. When the lowest type of men hear Tao, They laugh heartily at it. Without the laugh, there is no Tao.”
-Lao-tzu, The Way of Lao-tzu

lafaro
04-25-09, 12:20 PM
i had a bootleg years ago called sky church havent seen it for years does any one have it ?

stplsd
04-25-09, 05:22 PM
Good morning stplsd,

Ha ha! I dig Monty Python, never mind my silly walk. Have a joyous day!

Nonhuman

“When the highest type of men hear Tao, They diligently practice it. When the average type of men hear Tao, They half believe in it. When the lowest type of men hear Tao, They laugh heartily at it. Without the laugh, there is no Tao.”
-Lao-tzu, The Way of Lao-tzu

Ha-ha-ha! "anybody that doesn't follow me is the lowest type", now where have I heard that before? Oh, yes, just about every religion and tinpot dictator in history. If you dig Monty, check out the 'Life of Brian' and the 'Meaning of Life'

Nonhuman
04-25-09, 08:09 PM
Goodness, that isn't Tao at all! Tao means "way". Like the old blues saying, "sometimes I'm lower than a snake's belly in a wagon track".

Yes I remember Life Of Brian, didn't he sing a little song of life while he was on the cross? I saw the soundtrack on a torrent yesterday and was almost motivated to download it. I forget the "meaning of life", a faint memory of Mel Brooks holding the ten commandments comes to mind, perhaps I'm off track.

What I like best about Jimi is that more than anyone else, I think Jimi influenced Jimi. He had his "way".

Nonhuman

Nonhuman
04-26-09, 05:06 PM
i had a bootleg years ago called sky church havent seen it for years does any one have it ?

Was it sky church or electric church? I think remember Jimi rap an intro and call the band electric sky church. I saw a boot called "electric church" here:

http://wemisshendrix.blogspot.com/2009_02_01_archive.html

Nonhuman

purple jim
04-27-09, 11:25 AM
Electric Flag influenced Jimi. Not just the fact that Buddy Miles was in there but maybe their name gave Jimi the idea for his version of The Star Spangles Banner ?
Just an idea.

Roland Stone
09-03-09, 12:31 AM
A belated answer to the question about where did Jimi quote "Hail to the Chief" - the answer is probably "nowhere". What I thought was "Hail to the Chief" is more likely "In an English Country Garden". Similar rhythmic meter but slightly different melody.

The funny thing about "In An English Country Garden" is that it was also a favorite quote of Charlie Parker who used it frequently as an ending tag to bebop songs, so is it possible that in this context Jimi was influenced by Bird?

Jimi uses it at the end of "Hey Joe" at Gothenburg 9-1-70. If I recall correctly, he may have also used it at Isle of Wight and elsewhere during the Cry of Love tour.

Pali Gap
09-03-09, 03:41 AM
The mixed community he grew up in Seattle was a strong influence-I think it made him open minded and electic in his taste in music and enabled him to relate to all people. His deprived childhood may have made him live in his imagination more as well. Maybe also his indian blood gave him his shamanic feel towards his guitar playing and visionary approach towards his music that people always go on about. Living in England Hendrix is quoted as saying that really influenced his lyric writing.

But I think many things influenced him he was big sponge as far as music was concerned I think he loved anything that was good, but it certainly appears he loved blues the most.

stplsd
09-06-09, 04:51 PM
A belated answer to the question about where did Jimi quote "Hail to the Chief" - the answer is probably "nowhere". What I thought was "Hail to the Chief" is more likely "In an English Country Garden". Similar rhythmic meter but slightly different melody.

The funny thing about "In An English Country Garden" is that it was also a favorite quote of Charlie Parker who used it frequently as an ending tag to bebop songs, so is it possible that in this context Jimi was influenced by Bird?

Jimi uses it at the end of "Hey Joe" at Gothenburg 9-1-70. If I recall correctly, he may have also used it at Isle of Wight and elsewhere during the Cry of Love tour.

Thanks for clearing that up Roland. Very interesting bit about Bird too.

Interesting thought?
I just noticed that Billboard's top ten Xmas singles from 67, 68 & 69 had 'Little Drummer Boy' by Harry Simeone and 'Silent Night' by Mahalia Jackson listed for each year. 'Little Drummer Boy' had two entries in 67: Harry's & also Lou Rawls.

Pali Gap
09-09-09, 09:36 AM
Not familiar with Hopkins, can you suggest some tracks of his that may have influenced Hendrix to some degree, please?


Hopkins was a country blues player and I think perhaps it might be more the style of Hopkins guitar playing they way he sang and accompanied himself that might have influenced Hendrix.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFN9lebEvF0

This is "Cotton"-IMO the ultimate in guitar playing- apart from our man. Must say Id love to play like Lightning..

Purplz
11-14-11, 04:47 PM
I've been doing some research lately concerning Jimi's influences but apart from the overly repeated sources citing the same artist like:
Elmore James,
Elvis,
Buddy Guy,
Howlin' Wolf
Curtis Mayfield
and Muddy Waters,

I can't find anything else about his favorite artists.

For instance, I can definitely hear some "My friend" in "Country Boy" by Muddy Waters.

So... does anyone know what kind of music he listened to in his training years?

Fenders Fingers
11-14-11, 04:53 PM
Check out the interview on the recent Winterland set.

Purplz
11-14-11, 05:07 PM
Check out the interview on the recent Winterland set.

Do you mean this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ms97SlDEQHM ?

Ezy Rider
11-14-11, 05:51 PM
or the actual Winterland interview, in his own words: Billy Butler, Muddy Waters and Eddie Cochrane.

Voodoo Kush
11-14-11, 06:51 PM
The interview he's referring to is from 11/16/68 at the Boston Gardens, Massachusetts. It was recently released on the Live at Winterland boxset, CD 4, by Experience Hendrix. Here's a clip here:http:// http://www.guitarworld.com/exclusive-unreleased-jimi-hendrix-boston-garden-interview-part-2

Off the top of my head, I would say that
* Wes Montgomery and possibly Charlie Christian
* All the blues guys like T-Bone Walker to Robert Johnson
* Dick Dale (yeah, surf music)
* Leslie West (Well, he definitely dug his playing)
* Eric Clapton/Cream
* Bob Dylan
* Keep in mind he played a LOT of soul in the chitlin' circuit.

While most of those are wild guesses, he mentions a lot of 50's artist that occasionally I will look up and say "what!?" because I don't hear the connection. If you think back to LA Forum 69', he mentions Mambo music - as in Latin jazz, and in Tulsa, Oklahoma 1970 he says "Country and Western - Mexico style" while playing the Flamenco passage before the SSB. He also covered piano artist like Ray Charles "Lonely Avenue" and the great Henry Mancini's "Peter Gunn." Very Eclectic.



(http://www.guitarworld.com/exclusive-unreleased-jimi-hendrix-boston-garden-interview-part-2)

trampledunderfoot
11-15-11, 12:38 AM
A better question (maybe not) might be "who didn't influence Hendrix"? The man had a diverse (and, from what I can tell, excellent) taste in music.

Roland Stone
11-15-11, 01:21 AM
Don't forget Miss Toni Fisher. Jimi loved "The Big Hurt" enough to bring it up in an interview with the Cleveland Plain Dealer. Probably the first use of "phlange phasing" in a pop record, many years before Jimi revived it on Axis.

Roland Stone
11-26-11, 08:16 PM
Santo & Johnny "The Breeze & I"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJqEb7-zCWw&feature=related (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJqEb7-zCWw&feature=related)

stplsd
12-11-11, 12:53 AM
Don't forget Miss Toni Fisher. Jimi loved "The Big Hurt" enough to bring it up in an interview with the Cleveland Plain Dealer. Probably the first use of "phlange phasing" in a pop record, many years before Jimi revived it on Axis.


That should be, 'many years before the Small Faces "revived" it.' (If indeed George Chkiantz, or whoever the engineer, had ever heard this record and didn't just re-invent it's use on a pop record;))

purple jim
08-25-12, 05:33 AM
And we know Jimi was a Coasters fan because "Takin Care of No Business" is almost a direct lift of "D.W. Washburn"!

Another inspiration was perhaps Louis Jordan's "Nobody But Me" which has a very similar lyrical and vocal style ( a guy explaining how unluckily he is).

Roland Stone
09-02-12, 09:45 PM
Just noticed a "Rollin and Tumblin" quote during a Winterland "Lover Man" solo.

stplsd
09-03-12, 05:17 AM
Just noticed a "Rollin and Tumblin" quote during a Winterland "Lover Man" solo.

Which one?

Roland Stone
09-03-12, 08:32 PM
"Lover Man" - Disc Two Track Three of the Winterland 6 CD Box Set from EH. Not sure which show that is. The "Rollin and Tumblin" quote is brief but stood out for me, just because it's not something I've heard Jimi play elsewhere.

Roland Stone
09-06-12, 08:16 PM
From the same Winterland show - what is the jingle that Jimi plays during the dental coda to Purple Haze? I've heard him play it several times.

susep73
09-06-12, 10:04 PM
Santo & Johnny "The Breeze & I"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJqEb7-zCWw&feature=related (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJqEb7-zCWw&feature=related)

awesome.

susep73
09-06-12, 10:06 PM
another influence, the guy who beat Jimi in a duel in his Memphis days only because he had a louder amp, something Jimi would never forget.

Roland Stone
09-07-12, 10:57 PM
From the same Winterland show - what is the jingle that Jimi plays during the dental coda to Purple Haze? I've heard him play it several times.

is it a cigarette commercial? LSMFT? Or an aftershave commercial? Help me out you guys!

J.Lucas
09-08-12, 12:05 AM
.....Yes I remember Life Of Brian, didn't he sing a little song of life while he was on the cross? I saw the soundtrack on a torrent yesterday and was almost motivated to download it....

"Look On The Bright Side Of Life" (all Things Dull and Ugly)
sung while hanging on the cross...
LOL...funny movie

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WoaktW-Lu38

Some things in life are bad
They can really make you mad
Other things just make you swear and curse.
When you're chewing on life's gristle
Don't grumble, give a whistle
And this'll help things turn out for the best...

And...always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the light side of life...

If life seems jolly rotten
There's something you've forgotten
And that's to laugh and smile and dance and sing.
When you're feeling in the dumps
Don't be silly chumps
Just purse your lips and whistle - that's the thing.

And...always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the light side of life...

For life is quite absurd
And death's the final word
You must always face the curtain with a bow.
Forget about your sin - give the audience a grin
Enjoy it - it's your last chance anyhow.

So always look on the bright side of death
Just before you draw your terminal breath

Life's a piece of shit
When you look at it
Life's a laugh and death's a joke, it's true.
You'll see it's all a show
Keep 'em laughing as you go
Just remember that the last laugh is on you.

And always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the right side of life...
(Come on guys, cheer up!)
Always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the bright side of life...
(Worse things happen at sea, you know.)
Always look on the bright side of life...
(I mean - what have you got to lose?)
(You know, you come from nothing - you're going back to nothing.
What have you lost? Nothing!)
Always look on the right side of life...

purple jim
09-08-12, 02:57 AM
^Eric Idle stepped up to sing the song at the Olympic closing ceremony.

Roland Stone
09-09-12, 11:05 PM
is it a cigarette commercial? LSMFT? Or an aftershave commercial? Help me out you guys!

I'm pretty sure I've figured it out. I think its the "Beneficial Finance" theme. "At beneficial you're good for more". But I can't seem to find the audio for the commercial online to confirm my guess.

Roland Stone
09-10-12, 07:45 PM
Ok, mystery solved. It's the "Gillette Look Sharp Be Sharp March" by Mahlon Merrick. Interesting that "Be Sharp" has a musical connotation as in B# = C. Also Gillette was the TV sponsor of the "Friday Night Fights", a popular show in the late 50's where a young Jimi may have heard this theme. "To Look Sharp, every time you shave, to Feel Sharp, make your beard behave, just Be Sharp, use Gillette Blue Blades for the quickest, slickest shave of all."

Jimi only quotes the first line when he plays it at the end of the Winterland Purple Haze: "To look sharp, every time you shave . . ."

stplsd
12-10-12, 01:50 PM
"Boogie Chillen'" by JL Hooker, Jimi and Buddy break into this for over a minute during the "Keep On Groovin" jam on MSI album

dino77
12-10-12, 03:37 PM
"Boogie Chillen'" by JL Hooker, Jimi and Buddy break into this for over a minute during the "Keep On Groovin" jam on MSI album

Right...good catch.

J.Lucas
12-27-12, 06:13 PM
[QUOTE=J.Lucas;74873]"Look On The Bright Side Of Life" (all Things Dull and Ugly)
sung while hanging on the cross...
LOL...funny movie

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WoaktW-Lu38

--------------------
The Fairly Incomplete and Rather Badly Illustrated Monty Python Songbook
14mb - 100 page .PDF
18670
http://i.minus.com/1353098472/PLD-10iJ_AV2omUWSK7EQA/dbg9yGgo40v609/The Fairly Incomplete Rather Badly Illustrated Monty Python Songbook.pdf (http://i.minus.com/1353098472/PLD-10iJ_AV2omUWSK7EQA/dbg9yGgo40v609/The%20Fairly%20Incomplete%20Rather%20Badly%20Illus trated%20Monty%20Python%20Songbook.pdf)

Re-issue of a classic Monty Python humour title containing
all their most famous songs, with a foreword by 'Elvis Presley',
and complete instructions on how to play the piano.

From The Lumberjack Song to Always Look on the Bright Side of Life,
The Fairly Incomplete & Rather Badly Illustrated Monty Python Songbook
does pretty much what it says on the cover, collecting up the cream of
the Python team's musical output from the four TV series and the various
feature films.
----

Included are such gems as
Eric the Half-a-Bee,
Sit on My Face and Tell Me That You Love Me,
Bruces' Philosophers Song,
Oliver Cromwell,
The Knights of the Round Table,
Christmas in Heaven,
and All Things Dull & Ugly amongst many others,
all arranged with music for the piano and accompanied
by Terry Gilliam's incomparable cartoons.

Roland Stone
01-04-13, 08:46 PM
Currently reading Buddy Guy's autobiography. He says surprisingly little about Jimi. Apparently they only met once, in Canada at a gig that also featured Joni Mitchell. Guy claims not to have known who Hendrix was or to have heard his music at the time. He says Jimi asked permission to record his gig on his portable reel-to-reel (Jimi asked the same of Joni). Guy says they also jammed and that Jimi was respectfully in the background and played a solo where "he didn't mind getting a little lost." Guy calls Jimi a "good blues man", but seems otherwise unimpressed. Guy also claims that Earl Hooker was performing with a wah-wah before Jimi but that Jimi took it farther out. Guy's autobiography is a good read, but he really doesn't say much else about Jimi other than to claim that Jimi "studied" his style. Probably true, but we all know Jimi far surpassed and transcended any influence Guy may have had on him.

Lord Summerisle
01-05-13, 12:40 AM
22222222222
Currently reading Buddy Guy's autobiography. He says surprisingly little about Jimi. Apparently they only met once, in Canada at a gig that also featured Joni Mitchell. Guy claims not to have known who Hendrix was or to have heard his music at the time. He says Jimi asked permission to record his gig on his portable reel-to-reel (Jimi asked the same of Joni). Guy says they also jammed and that Jimi was respectfully in the background and played a solo where "he didn't mind getting a little lost." Guy calls Jimi a "good blues man", but seems otherwise unimpressed. Guy also claims that Earl Hooker was performing with a wah-wah before Jimi but that Jimi took it farther out. Guy's autobiography is a good read, but he really doesn't say much else about Jimi other than to claim that Jimi "studied" his style. Probably true, but we all know Jimi far surpassed and transcended any influence Guy may have had on him.2

Thats fair enough I guess, it's Buddy's book about his life, not a book about Hendrix.

Bodhi
01-05-13, 02:05 AM
Currently reading Buddy Guy's autobiography. He says surprisingly little about Jimi. Apparently they only met once, in Canada at a gig that also featured Joni Mitchell. Guy claims not to have known who Hendrix was or to have heard his music at the time. He says Jimi asked permission to record his gig on his portable reel-to-reel (Jimi asked the same of Joni). Guy says they also jammed and that Jimi was respectfully in the background and played a solo where "he didn't mind getting a little lost." Guy calls Jimi a "good blues man", but seems otherwise unimpressed. Guy also claims that Earl Hooker was performing with a wah-wah before Jimi but that Jimi took it farther out. Guy's autobiography is a good read, but he really doesn't say much else about Jimi other than to claim that Jimi "studied" his style. Probably true, but we all know Jimi far surpassed and transcended any influence Guy may have had on him.
I know he certainly admires Jimi, every show of his I've been to he talks about him and plays VCSR.

crazee_canuck
03-07-13, 03:07 PM
Speaking about publishing....check it out, radio station stamped date "May 4, 1968" on Capitol Records no less. Our good friend Ed was going for the whole song catalog by the looks of this. LOL.

[snipped scan]



Holy shit! In 1968?!

BTW, in case others aren't familiar with it (I wasn't): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOC1vAldWds



Now a short story about the Next To Your Fire single:
Former Pack producer John Rhys (who wrote and produced the very first Pack single back in 1965) had been contacted by Jim Atherton [The Pack's manager] and Don Brewer to represent them again, as he had recently engaged with Capitol records to promote acts from Detroit. So, HE WAS the first to position the band in Capitol records.
Rhys had been given a demo copy of [Next To Your] Fire, directly by Jimmi Hendrix when in England and thought that song would be tremendous for Mark Farner and The Pack.
While many of the younger at Capitol thought the record was a 'smash' the powers that didn't understand the product, wouldn't allocate the funds to fully promote the single. Even worse, later that year they refused to release 'The Pack' LP, basically consisted of material that ended up one year later [1969] on 'On Time'
.

outasight
03-07-13, 09:11 PM
I can tell you one that surprised me....The Band! Tears of Rage. He liked it so much he recorded his own version. Interesting to me being a big Band fan.

purple jim
06-13-13, 01:15 AM
I don't know if this one has been mentioned. An inspiration for Jimi's opening for "Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)"?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wdmhAFBnAoE

dino77
06-13-13, 01:45 AM
I can tell you one that surprised me....The Band! Tears of Rage. He liked it so much he recorded his own version. Interesting to me being a big Band fan.

He was a major Dylan fan, that's why he recorded Tears of Rage. It was originally recorded in summer 67 and among the Basement Tapes circulated soon after by Albert Grossman. So Jimi's covering Bob's, not The Band's version - which was released in mid -68 after Jimi's cover was recorded.
Who knows if he liked The Band - in one interview Jimi says that he wishes Bob could play with musicians that are more creative.

Lord Summerisle
06-13-13, 02:27 AM
He was a major Dylan fan, that's why he recorded Tears of Rage. It was originally recorded in summer 67 and among the Basement Tapes circulated soon after by Albert Grossman. So Jimi's covering Bob's, not The Band's version - which was released in mid -68 after Jimi's cover was recorded.
Who knows if he liked The Band - in one interview Jimi says that he wishes Bob could play with musicians that are more creative.
Interesting. Do you know when this interview took place?

dino77
06-13-13, 01:28 PM
Interesting. Do you know when this interview took place?

Pretty sure it was a printed interview and I know it's here somewhere! Can't remember the date, sorry. Will look for it.

stplsd
06-14-13, 08:23 AM
Who knows if he liked The Band - in one interview Jimi says that he wishes Bob could play with musicians that are more creative.

Yes, I remember this statement, I'm not sure it was the Band he was talking about, I think an Lp was being discussed? Can't remember off-hand which interview though

dino77
06-14-13, 10:57 AM
^ Found it, your old post:

http://crosstowntorrents.org/showthread.php?1403-Newspaper-amp-Magazine-Articles-(Text-Only)-1960-s-1970-s&highlight=blonde+blonde

Monday 6 February 1967
UK
WEST ONE (The Polytechnic, London student paper)

On Bob Dylan
Jimi: “I saw him one time but both of us were stoned out of our minds. I remember it vaguely. It was at this place called ‘The Kettle of Fish’ in the Village. We were both stoned there and we just hung around laughing - yeah, we just laughed. People have always got to put him down, I really dig him though. I like that ‘Highway 61 Revisited’ album and especially ‘Just Like Tom Thumbs Blues’. He doesn’t inspire me actually because I could never write the kind of words he does, but he’s helped me out in trying to write ‘cause I got a thousand songs that will never be finished. I just lie around and write two or three words but now I have a little more confidence in trying to finish one. When I was down in ‘The Village’ Dylan was starving down there, I hear he used to have a pad with him all the time to put down what he sees around him. But he doesn’t have to be stoned when he writes although he probably is a cat like that… I’d like to play some sessions behind Dylan, his group ought to be a little more creative.

Seems he's referring to Dylan's recordings in general. Actually, The Hawks - later The Band - played on very few Dylan studio recordings released in the 60's - the "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window" 45 is an example; though Robbie Robertson played on Blonde On Blonde.

MourningStar
06-14-13, 02:15 PM
hmmm, ... is it possible Dylan may have had a say-so on how 'creative' his support could be? I think Hendrix was simply expressing his desire that the musicianship behind Dylan be more explorative. Hendrix obviously had the visionary gift of interpretation of the most fundamental of tunes, culminating in the landmark version of Dylan's AATW - a 'creative' accomplishment by which all can agree is THE standard one can measure by.

peace1

Ezy Rider
06-14-13, 02:54 PM
hmmm, ... is it possible Dylan may have had a say-so on how 'creative' his support could be? I think Hendrix was simply expressing his desire that the musicianship behind Dylan be more explorative. Hendrix obviously had the visionary gift of interpretation of the most fundamental of tunes, culminating in the landmark version of Dylan's AATW - a 'creative' accomplishment by which all can agree is THE standard one can measure by.

peace1

Dylan was also held down by his "folk" image (and fans) preventing him for being too "creative". Obviously, even though Dylan went electric, it sure wasn't enough for Hendrix.

Lord Summerisle
06-14-13, 06:39 PM
^ Found it, your old post:

http://crosstowntorrents.org/showthread.php?1403-Newspaper-amp-Magazine-Articles-(Text-Only)-1960-s-1970-s&highlight=blonde+blonde

Monday 6 February 1967
UK
WEST ONE (The Polytechnic, London student paper)

On Bob Dylan
Jimi: “I saw him one time but both of us were stoned out of our minds. I remember it vaguely. It was at this place called ‘The Kettle of Fish’ in the Village. We were both stoned there and we just hung around laughing - yeah, we just laughed. People have always got to put him down, I really dig him though. I like that ‘Highway 61 Revisited’ album and especially ‘Just Like Tom Thumbs Blues’. He doesn’t inspire me actually because I could never write the kind of words he does, but he’s helped me out in trying to write ‘cause I got a thousand songs that will never be finished. I just lie around and write two or three words but now I have a little more confidence in trying to finish one. When I was down in ‘The Village’ Dylan was starving down there, I hear he used to have a pad with him all the time to put down what he sees around him. But he doesn’t have to be stoned when he writes although he probably is a cat like that… I’d like to play some sessions behind Dylan, his group ought to be a little more creative.

Seems he's referring to Dylan's recordings in general. Actually, The Hawks - later The Band - played on very few Dylan studio recordings released in the 60's - the "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window" 45 is an example; though Robbie Robertson played on Blonde On Blonde.

Thanks for that. I don't recall reading this.

Ezy Rider
12-30-13, 10:56 AM
“One night we were playing the Whisky, and when we were in the dressing room this really well-dressed black man wearing a hat with a feather in it walks in and says to Clarence, ‘Are you Clarence White?’ And Clarence says, ‘Yeah.” And the fellow adds, ‘Well, I really love the way you play guitar. I’ve been listening to you for years and you’re one of my favorite players.’ So Clarence says, ‘Wow. Thanks a lot. What did you say your name was?’ The fellow says, ‘I’m Jimi Hendrix.’”
–Gene Parsons to Rick Petreysik, “Echoes of a Country Rock Legend,” Guitar Player, September 1992, p. 84

http://www.adioslounge.com/clarence-white-strap-yourself-to-a-tree-with-roots-1970-part-8/

Sid Griffin: Hendrix was a big fan of Clarence White and Hendrix used to go see The Byrds, not so much to hang out with McGuinn, it was his buddy and all that and he liked the psychedelic breaks McGuinn did on the 12-string, but really it was to see Clarence White. And Hendrix was a big Clarence White fan. He would come backstage and hang out with Clarence and give him a hug and shake his hand and tell him how amazing he was. It?s been documented many times.

http://www.prx.org/pieces/13985/transcripts/13985

MP
12-31-13, 02:24 AM
I recall someone asking Jimi about the Band in an interview, said interviewer really liked them and said something like they really take you to a different place, Jimi's comment was along the lines of "well, they take you to where they want to go", and that he didn't like the way they played their songs the same way at every show.

MP
12-31-13, 02:27 AM
Thanks for the link to Bo's Bounce, never heard that before. Sure sounds like an early influence for Voodoo Child to me. The beginning part, with the bouncy guitar? Kind of like the intro to VC. The riffs played afterwards, also kind of close. I think you're on to something there.

dino77
12-31-13, 03:48 AM
I recall someone asking Jimi about the Band in an interview, said interviewer really liked them and said something like they really take you to a different place, Jimi's comment was along the lines of "well, they take you to where they want to go", and that he didn't like the way they played their songs the same way at every show.

Hi MP - it's from the John Burks Rolling Stone interview:

"Interestingly, while Hendrix retains his fondness for Dylan-including Nashville Skyline, from which Jimi intends to record "that one about the drifter" — none of the Experience are especially admiring of the Band. Hendrix allowed as how the Band definitely have it together enough to take you on their trip, if that's where you want to go. Mitch Mitchell asked with a small smile if the Band didn't all have pipes and mustaches."

Poetry
02-04-14, 09:11 AM
As for Howlin Wolf, who was mentioned here, I would like to add his great guitarist Hubert Sumlin.
And what about the great Earl Hooker ? Not well known, since he was a sideman and mostly did instrumentals on his own, but, I think his playing or at least experimenting might have influenced Jimi.