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funhouse
04-14-09, 10:31 AM
Hi, I'm a newbie, so forgive me if this topic has been covered before, but are there any bootlegs out there of the legendary Newark concert after Jimi learnt of MLK's death?

dino77
04-14-09, 12:08 PM
The answer is sadly no - any recordings that claim to be from that date are fake.

scoutship
04-19-09, 08:17 PM
Not only have no tapes of the music ever turnt up, the story told of the Experience improvising a piece of "appalling beauty" that left members of the audience in tears, and Jimi then solemnly laying down his guitar and walking off stage without a word (after the claimed "This is for a friend of mine" introduction), seems not to've occurred, either, despite the purported ear&eyewitness testimony of the gentleman doing lights for Soft Machine who has told it.

At least one newspaper covered that concert, and the photos exist.

Nice story though.

stplsd
04-19-09, 11:13 PM
^
Yeah, some pople just can't help it (funny how no-one else there "remembers" this awesome event)

MourningStar
04-19-09, 11:59 PM
The answer is sadly no - any recordings that claim to be from that date are fake.Fake? What does this mean? The recordings are by some other band or what?

yelapavision
04-20-09, 12:29 AM
Fake? What does this mean? The recordings are by some other band or what?

Just means that it's never known as to be recorded, or circulated.

scoutship
04-20-09, 12:47 AM
Coupla other comments & recollectings re: the evening in question:


On Friday, April 5, 1968, the day after Martin Luther King was assassinated, Hendrix was scheduled to play two concerts at the Town Hall theater in Newark, New Jersey. The previous night, according to that day's New York Times, police had arrested a dozen people across the Hudson River in New York City. When New York's mayor went up to Harlem to try and defuse the situation, he "was caught in the midst of an unruly crowd and had to be hustled into a limousine by bodyguards," according to the Times. In Memphis, where King's assassination took place, 4,000 National Guardsmen were brought in. The previous summer, 26 people died, 1,500 were injured, and 1,000 arrested when Newark burst into flames and riot. On the night of April 4, the Times reported, "Bottles and rocks were thrown in two parts of the city's Central Ward...but the police said they had quieted the disturbances quickly. There were no arrests or injuries."

When the Jimi Hendrix Experience pulled into Newark (http://javascript%3Cb%3E%3C/b%3E:void%280%29;), however, it was like nothing any of them had seen before. "I remember this vividly," recalls Experience bass player Noel Redding. "We got down to Newark, to the venue, and there were tanks in the street. It was the first time I'd actually seen that."

That night, the Jimi Hendrix Experience only played one short set and canceled the second one. Many assumed it was Hendrix's reaction to Dr. King's violent death. After all, Sammy Davis Jr., Louis Armstrong, Sidney Poitier, and Diahann Caroll had all already announced they would not participate in the following Monday night's Oscar presentations in deference to the death of Dr. King.

"My impression of that Newark thing, it was that we came and saw tanks on the street," Redding continues. "We were supposed to do two shows. The police and the Army advised us to do one show and get out of town. So we did exactly that."

"I've got my diary in front of me," he adds. "It says, 'All riots. Only did one show instead of two. We came back to the hotel and went clubbing. Went to bed at 6 a.m.'"

"The city administrators said, 'You can't do a concert here now because it's volatile,'" reflects Velvert Turner, a longtime friend of Hendrix's. "Jimi was accepted by the white majority in terms of the rock 'n' roll establishment. When you talk about having a concert in Newark, the next question would be, 'Who would attend the concert in Newark, which is a predominantly black constituency, as well as Town Hall being in a black neighborhood? Who would need to come there?' Jimi's acceptance at that time was among predominantly white rock 'n' roll fans. You are asking white rock 'n' roll fans to walk into a beehive of activity, a powder-keg that was just exploding."

"I come from Bloomfield, New Jersey, which is the next town," notes Bob Cianci, author of Great Rock Drummers of the Sixties and correspondent for Modern Drummer and Blues Review, who was at the show in Newark. "There had been riots in Newark that past summer. Of course, being in the next town, I knew what was going on back there. The night of that show, however, I didn't see any tanks, I didn't see any crowds, I didn't see any problems."

"We went on and did one show," Redding recollects. "It was very short as far as I can recall, probably about 45 minutes. There had been a lot of rioting going on."

"I think we were going to take the bus down to Newark," Cianci says. "And then, of course, Martin Luther King was killed. There was a lot of trepidation on the part of our parents about us going down to Newark to see this show. So my friend's father somehow bought a ticket the day of the show. He drove us down to Newark and took us to the show. I think, if he hadn't done that, we probably would not have been able to go."

In keeping with Hendrix's following at the time, as well as Turner's comments, the audience that night in Newark was "overwhelmingly white," Cianci says, adding that the hall was half or two thirds empty. "As soon as Jimi came on, he said, 'Everybody c'mon and move down to the front.' I can tell you some of the songs they did do. They did 'Fire.' They did 'Foxy Lady.' They did 'Red House.' And I know they ended with 'I Don't Live Today.' I don't have total recollection of this. It's been thirty years. I remember quite a bit of it. They did a lot of the first album."

Ironically, Redding recalls, "We did the one show, which was more of a jam as far as I can recollect, than one of our proper shows. We basically played a load of blues for 45 minutes, then we went straight back to New York."

"I don't think it was much more than a 45-minute set," Cianci agrees. "I don't recall whether he mentioned (about the assassination). The thing I remember most about their performance is that it was very subdued. There were no histrionics, at least not until the end of the show. Jimi just kind of stood there and played. He really played that night. I feel I was kind of fortunate to see him doing that, under unfortunate circumstances. But to see him hang back and play...

"At the end, there was the big feedback guitar thing, and I remember Jimi taking his Strat off and throwing it into his Marshall amps. He had one of these coiled guitar chords and pulled it back. I remember him stretching that all the way out and then just flinginghis guitar into the amps. And then he turned around, grinned at the audience. I think that was the end of the show.

"I can tell you with confidence," he concludes, "that there was no violence. There was no trouble. We didn't hear or see anything that would lead us to believe that there was going to be trouble that night. It was just an enjoyable experience. No problems at all."

Turner knew there wouldn't be. While the police and the National Guard might have had concerns about the ability of Hendrix's music to incite the crowd, Turner discerned the truth. "My experience with Jimi was the music had the ability to unite and to heal. It acted as a balm as opposed to a bomb," he says, adding, "Jimi might have been a person who philosophically would say the place you need to be the day after Martin Luther King's death would be Newark."

Then, philosophically, maybe not. Hendrix took an aggressively apolitical stance. "Jimi was a musician first and foremost," says Cox. "He believed that musicians should be musicians, politicians should be politicians."

"None of us were really political," his predecessor, Redding, agrees.

(excerpted from HERE (http://www.jimihendrix.com/magazine/602/602,features,burninghouse.html))

stplsd
04-20-09, 04:52 PM
<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>
1. There were no riots in Newark following King's assassination

On the night of April 4, the Times reported, "Bottles and rocks were thrown in two parts of the city's Central Ward...but the police said they had quieted the disturbances quickly. There were no arrests or injuries."
2. Jimi wasn’t political only in the narrow sense of not openly supporting a faction of the traditional two party political system of government, but then the ‘The movement’ - the Weathermen, Timothy Leary, the Diggers, the Yippies etc. didn’t either<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>He often spoke of the Indigenous Americans and other minorities. Especially the Black Panthers (who were anti Vietnam war), who he frequently spoke of, in generally supportive terms, and although usually speaking against violence, sometimes appeared to accept it as an inevitable part of societal change. Spoke against the burning of “Black” neighbourhoods during riots. Spoke of his support for Martin Luther King. Attended political benefits (Moratorium, Biafra). He spoke of his support for the soldiers in Vietnam (not the war, well, at least not after mid 1967!)- adding Cambodia when the war engulfed it as well. Spoke of his support for those who had fled the draft. He also spoke against organised religion, seeing it as divisive and a tool of oppression. He spoke of his support for the availability of abortion. He was strongly in favour of social integration and inclusiveness of alI people regardless of age or background, against the police state, was pro ecology, equality for women. He considered his music as being a force for changing society etc..etc… Not political? Come on!

Trotzkee
04-20-09, 06:26 PM
Jimi did not actively participate in political groups, events or protests, therefore he was not a politician or an active political force. What you listed are beliefs; everyone has beliefs [and social problems they wish to see remedied]. Though, did he have political influence among a certain demographic? Of course.

Jimi made a few comments here and there, but in essence, he was not very political.

Roland Stone
04-20-09, 08:58 PM
According to Janis Ian, the previous night, at the moment MLK was pronounced dead, she and Jimi were at the Generation club which would eventually become Electric Lady studios, watching B.B. King open for Sly Stone. B.B. read a note onstage that MLK had been pronounced dead. Ted Nugent says he was there too and they all jammed.

stplsd
04-21-09, 05:53 AM
Jimi did not actively participate in political groups, events or protests, therefore he was not a politician or an active political force. What you listed are beliefs; everyone has beliefs [and social problems they wish to see remedied]. Though, did he have political influence among a certain demographic? Of course.

Jimi made a few comments here and there, but in essence, he was not very political.

Nothing I mentioned above was a "belief" ie I'm not talking about what he had to say about 'life after death' or whether there are aliens from another planet visiting us.
I never said he was a "politician" (whatever that means). Nobody's saying he was running around being 'Mr politics'. But to deny that he was political is being patronising really. He did "actively participate in political events" as I already stated the Moratorium, the Scene club Biafra benefit also the MLK benefit. Jerry Rubin of the Yippies spoke at his 1st Berkeley show and he prominently wore a Yippie! badge for a time. Billy Cox remembers them delberately getting arrested for refusing to move from a "whites only" bench in the south. Not taking part in "protests" does not make you apolitical.


By speaking to massive audiences about his support - or not - for political groups or policies he was of course being an "active political force". Let's not be naive.


"Everyone has social problems they wish to see remedied" - many people just don't care, unless it affects them. And of those that do only a few people have the power to influence people to remedy them.


"Though, did he have political influence among a certain demographic? Of course."

Exactly, I have political influence, I use it ergo I am political. No?


"a certain demographic" - the most popular and one of the busiest "live" entertainers at this time, with a large swathe of the most active and educated youth to 30 age group as his audience.

Being "political" does not neccessarily mean just picking a party and "supporting" them, or going on a "protest".

Talking "politics" with your fellow workers is often not a recipe for harmony, especially in a band situation, where the other members are not interested.

stplsd
04-21-09, 07:18 AM
According to Janis Ian, the previous night, at the moment MLK was pronounced dead, she and Jimi were at the Generation club which would eventually become Electric Lady studios, watching B.B. King open for Sly Stone. B.B. read a note onstage that MLK had been pronounced dead. Ted Nugent says he was there too and they all jammed.

Was it not B.B. King opening for Big Brother & the Holding Company?
MLK was announced dead on the 4th, all references to this jam have it on the night of the 7th and that those participating went their specifically for this jam.
I'm sure no one there would need to be told of his death? or is the date wrong?
Maybe B.B. was just announcing that there would be a jam/wake for MLK later?

<?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" /><st1:date Month="4" Day="4" Year="1968">http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=89365887</st1:date>
<st1:date Month="4" Day="4" Year="1968"></st1:date>
<st1:date Month="4" Day="4" Year="1968"></st1:date>
<st1:date Month="4" Day="4" Year="1968">4 April 1968</st1:date><?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>
It was supposed to be a routine campaign stop. In a poor section of <st1:City><st1:place>Indianapolis</st1:place></st1:City>, 40 years ago Friday, a largely black crowd had waited an hour to hear the presidential candidate speak. The candidate, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, had been warned not to go by the city's police chief. <o:p></o:p>

As his car entered the neighborhood, his police escort left him. Once there, he stood in the back of a flatbed truck. He turned to an aide and asked, "Do they know about Martin Luther King?" <o:p></o:p>

They didn't, and it was left to Kennedy to tell them that King had been shot and killed that night in <st1:place><st1:City>Memphis</st1:City>, <st1:State>Tenn.</st1:State></st1:place> The crowd gasped in horror.<o:p></o:p>
Kennedy spoke of King's dedication to "love and to justice between fellow human beings," adding that "he died in the cause of that effort."<o:p></o:p>

And Kennedy sought to heal the racial wounds that were certain to follow by referring to the death of his own brother, President John F. Kennedy. <o:p></o:p>
"For those of you who are black and are tempted to ... be filled with hatred and mistrust of the injustice of such an act, against all white people, I would only say that I can also feel in my own heart the same kind of feeling," he said. "I had a member of my family killed, but he was killed by a white man."<o:p></o:p>

Many other American cities burned after King was killed. But there was no fire in <st1:City><st1:place>Indianapolis</st1:place></st1:City>, which heard the words of Robert Kennedy.<o:p></o:p>
A historian says a well-organized black community kept its calm. It's hard to overlook the image of one single man, standing on a flatbed truck, who never looked down at the paper in his hand — only at the faces in the crowd.<o:p></o:p>
"My favorite poem, my — my favorite poet was Aeschylus," Robert Kennedy said, "and he once wrote:
<o:p></o:p>
Even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget
falls drop by drop upon the heart,
until, in our own despair,
against our will,
comes wisdom
through the awful grace of God.<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>

"What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love, and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or whether they be black."<o:p></o:p>
Two months later, Robert Kennedy himself was felled by an assassin's bullet.<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>

scoutship
04-21-09, 10:39 AM
Hmm, as I recall the events of April 4 through 15 were a bit hard to pin down, a friend spent a year+ researching, I've sent an email not heard back as yet. Specific night of Big Brother, ambiguous?, though B.B. was held over at Generation (different address from the site that became Electric Lady though I don't remember reason for that either) for quite awhile. Boyle, who clearly misremembers re: the Newark concert, also had said that the Experience flew directly back to NY after the 2 VA Beach Dome shows, Jimi may have gone to Generation late, Ian (16, 17 at the time) was from Jersey so may have been 'round, could be lots of conflated events messing with peoples' recollections, weeping & tears & MLK dedications are recalled from many audiences of that week.

Trenton had major riots, and Newark was put on alert/took precautions as they feared a repeat of the prev. years events. Several sources DO note rioting in many U.S. cities---including Newark---however a NY Times article points out that much of this was rumor plus fact that "normal" unruly events were assumed related to the assassination and thereby exaggerated. It is possible that Noel & Co saw tanks somewhere (not Trenton though, too out of the way) on the way over to Newark? Crazy time, '68 in the U.S.

Also there are people for whom the events around both assassinations (MLK & Kennedy) are hopelessly confused. Frustrating that Shapiro & Glebbeek never bothered doing much homework, and not only on this score.

Here is a site about the Experience's shows in VA Beach, April 4 and August 21 '68 (note broken guitar documented for end of 8-21, see it fly toward audience in last pic):

Experience, Soft Machine, Eire Apparent at the VA Beach Dome '68 (http://www.garagehangover.com/?q=Dome)

scoutship
04-21-09, 10:54 AM
Jimi did not actively participate in political groups, events or protests, therefore he was not a politician or an active political force.

Jimi is on film specifically stating that he is working on lyrics for the upcoming album that will try to provide answers for the problems then going on, rather than just more of the complaining & observation most others are then doing, as well as talking about one's responsibility to use one's influence to make a change or difference.

stplsd
04-21-09, 10:55 AM
^
Pennebakers 'Wake At Generation' film shows Jimi listening to the Big Brother show, if that makes it any clearer? What's the info on there being two Generation clubs with BB playing?

scoutship
04-21-09, 11:07 AM
p.s. re B.B. & Big Brother, yes, a NY Times blurb dated April 4 68, a Thursday, reads:

Pop Cabaret Opens at Site of Shuttered Village Barn

Generation, a new pop cabaret, has filled the gap at 54 West 8th Street left vacant by the closing of the Village Barn. The liquorless club opened Tuesday night with a show featuring Big Brother and the Holding Company and B.B. King.

The operator of Generation is Barry Imhoff, formerly associated with the Cafe Au Go Go on Bleecker Street. Mr. Imhoff said that more than $100,000 was being spent to refit the basement premises for a new entertainment and food policy. A capacity audience of 350 attended the opening show.

The informal atmosphere of the club is designed to appeal to "businessmen, Sweet 16's, and hippies." The admission price is $3.75 and there is a $1.50 food and/or drink minimum. A student discount of $1.50 will apply Sundays through Thursdays.

[note: it was the '54' in the address that had me misrecollecting the locale, sorry]

stplsd
04-21-09, 01:09 PM
Many thanks, very interesting clip.

Roland Stone
04-21-09, 03:17 PM
"Was it not B.B. King opening for Big Brother & the Holding Company?"

Yes, my mistake. So the Ted Nugent story was from a different night when B.B. was opening for Sly Stone.

But back to the night MLK died. Apparently there was a bit of time that passed between the time he was shot and the time he was officially pronounced dead. According to Janis Ian, B.B. King was given a note to read that MLK had been pronounced officially dead.

Also according to Janis Ian, Jimi already knew on this date that he would be the new owner of the club. Originally it was intended to be both a club AND a studio, but that idea proved impractical.

scoutship
04-21-09, 03:47 PM
But back to the night MLK died. Apparently there was a bit of time that passed between the time he was shot and the time he was officially pronounced dead.

King was shot at 6:01 pm, pronounced dead at 7:05 pm.

scoutship
04-21-09, 06:50 PM
(with much assistance from LS, tnx)



Also according to Janis Ian, Jimi already knew on this date that he would be the new owner of the club.

It would be interesting to know how she could have known this then. Maybe she took a cue from Shapiro & Glebbeek, EG, page 390:

The issue of New York's RAT Subterranean News for 19 April 1968 reported the gala opening of a new music club on 7 April in the Village on the site of the old Generation Club. Michael Goldstein sent out invitations to the press, who were entertained by B.B. King, Janis Joplin, Joni Mitchell, Buddy Guy, the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Richie Havens, Roy Buchanan and Jimi. The club had just been bought by Mike Jeffery as part of his own business expansion, which saw the simultaneous opening of Sergeant Pepper's in Majorca. The club was still called the Generation, although Jimi told one reporter it would be renamed Godiva's.

Can anyone spot any questionable items in there now? ;)

Or might an explanation be rooted in some manner of 'reverse ESP' on the part of the promotional team for her book?




Originally it was intended to be both a club AND a studio, but that idea proved impractical.

One hopes one would be thinking of this bit of very old info in a whole new light by this point...from several standpoints. Like as

--Just when did the lease on the Generation club actually become available? (Here is one area where we see distinctly that Cross's bio, too, suffers abyssmally from poor or second-hand research, btw.)

--If the Electric Ladyland album really came in at a cost of $70,000, then where did the $300,000 annual fee some cite for 'blocks of prime studio time' come from and how would it square with the former?

--Or, are the facts more in tune with John Storyk's recollections as relayed by McDermott & Co's Ultimate Hendrix (see pg 138)?

Resolving some of these questions, and the ones they in turn raise, will go a long way toward gaining a more complete understanding of how certain of the more curious pieces of the Hendrix puzzle actually fit together. Not always in accordance with published accounts, and far more disconcertingly than many fans might be comfortable knowing.

Anyone seriously interested in such answers can begin by giving Redding's book a bit more serious scrutiny. (And nearly all of the relevant case #s et al can still be had via online, I am told). It doesn't hurt, either, to note what he says about things like the Experience's short set at Newport 69, plus the fact that his book was published prior to the reopening of the case about the coroner's ruling. Even when Noel is wrong, he goes off track in some very illuminating ways.


Nov 1 1967:
http://i669.photobucket.com/albums/vv55/animal_logic2/Nov1_1967_NYTimes.jpg


The first country music program on network television (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0040056/)

Thirty years of Studio Design (http://mixonline.com/mag/audio_john_storyk_thirty/)

(p.s. Why was Monika given a "free pass" for so many years? Why assume she's the one who came up with the cover story? ;) )

[note to SR: And that's all the research we're going to give to you, Steve, lol]

Cheerio then.

Roland Stone
04-21-09, 07:19 PM
Oh my goodness. I clicked on that link for "Thirty Years of Studio Design" and read the article about designer John Storyk. It mentions that before he designed Electric Lady, he designed Cerebrum!

I never heard of Cerebrum until I listened to two hours of an old 60's radio broadcast by NYC DJ and "Mistress of the Night" Allison "Nightbird" (as in "Night Bird Flying") Steele. That broadcast contains several very psychedelic ads for "Cerebrum". Cerebrum was basically a place to trip. According to the radio ads you would go there, shed your clothes and be given some kind of a toga-like sheet to wear and led into a room with a light show and pillows and feathers and what-not and participate in some kind of communal participatory theater/performance art be-in where the audience was part of the entertainment. Although not exactly specified in the ad copy, it certainly seemed like free love and psychedelics were very much on the menu.

So how very interesting to read that Mike Jeffery's and Jimi were among Cerebrum's clientele and that Cerebrum was a direct inspiration for Electric Lady!

MourningStar
04-21-09, 08:16 PM
Cerebrum was basically a place to trip. According to the radio ads you would go there, shed your clothes and be given some kind of a toga-like sheet to wear and led into a room with a light show and pillows and feathers and what-not and participate in some kind of communal participatory theater/performance art be-in where the audience was part of the entertainment. Although not exactly specified in the ad copy, it certainly seemed like free love and psychedelics were very much on the menu.AAhhhhhhh ... what a flashback! A little bit of S.F./L.A. graces the East Coast. Those were the days ... trippin' on 'The Strip'!

stplsd
04-21-09, 08:38 PM
But back to the night MLK died. Apparently there was a bit of time that passed between the time he was shot and the time he was officially pronounced dead. According to Janis Ian, B.B. King was given a note to read that MLK had been pronounced officially dead.

Did you not read my post and link to Kennedy's speech announcing his death the same day, the 4th? It was no secret.



Also according to Janis Ian, Jimi already knew on this date that he would be the new owner of the club.

The club only opened on the 2nd:



NY Times blurb dated April 4 68, a Thursday, reads:
Pop Cabaret Opens at Site of Shuttered Village Barn
Generation, a new pop cabaret, has filled the gap at 54 West 8th Street left vacant by the closing of the Village Barn. The operator of Generation is Barry Imhoff, formerly associated with the Cafe Au Go Go on Bleecker Street. Mr. Imhoff said that more than $100,000 was being spent to refit the basement

and only five days later Jimi & Jeffery's bought it? You sure about that?

stplsd
04-21-09, 09:09 PM
Maybe she took a cue from Shapiro & Glebbeek, EG, page 390:
The issue of New York's RAT Subterranean News for 19 April 1968 reported the gala opening of a new music club on 7 April in the Village on the site of the old Generation Club. Michael Goldstein sent out invitations to the press, who were entertained by B.B. King, Janis Joplin, Joni Mitchell, Buddy Guy, the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Richie Havens, Roy


So in this version we're supposed to believe that the "old" Generation club (it only opened on the 2nd according to the NY times) was bought by Jeffery after it had been only opened a couple of days and that the last night of Big Brother's 7 night booking, was the opening of the club under Jeffery's new ownership and the jam had nothing to do with MLK it was just a press junket for the opening of the new club? Am I missing something here? Is someone taking the piss?

scoutship
04-21-09, 09:17 PM
So in this version we're supposed to believe that the "old" Generation club (it only opened on the 2nd according to the NY times) was bought by Jeffery after it had been only opened a couple of days and that the last night of Big Brother's 7 night booking, was the opening of the club under Jeffery's new ownership and the jam had nothing to do with MLK it was just a press junket for the opening of the new club? Am I missing something here? Is someone taking the piss?

The quote from Electric Gypsy is intended to show

1 - the unreliability of that book's "research"
2 - how much of what is published about Hendrix is simply recycled from one questionable source to another questionable source, all the bios do this...doesn't ANYONE do fact check anymore?
3 - raise the possibility that Ms. Ian may've sought help for her "sketchy" memory by checking what is considered by some to be the "Bible" of Hendrix info, EG...if so, maybe not the best place to go. Unless it was a deliberate fudge of some kind to create a promotional blurb for her book, using King's death to raise potential buyer interest?

Sorry if the sarcasm & irony weren't clear.

stplsd
04-21-09, 09:23 PM
The quote from Electric Gypsy is intended to show

1 - the unreliability of that book's "research"
2 - how much of what is published about Hendrix is simply recycled from questionable to questionable source, all the bios do this
3 - raise the possibility that Ms. Ian may've sought help for her "sketchy" memory by checking what is considered by some to be the "Bible" of Hendrix info, EG...if so, maybe not the best place to go

Sorry if the sarcasm & irony weren't clear.

No probs, man, I caught that, just thought I'd spell it out "for those who may be sleeping"

Roland Stone
04-21-09, 11:58 PM
I will leave the sorting out of historical accuracy to others. I enjoy all the first hand accounts regardless of inconsistencies. Here's the way Mr. Storyk recalls it:

"I found myself designing and actually building a very small club in SoHo-this was before the word "SoHo" existed-called Cerebrum. It was tiny and had a life of only nine months. This club was one of the new hot spots in town along with Dionysus and Electric Circus. All of a sudden at the age of 23 we're in Life and Time magazines. Then one night Jimi Hendrix and his manager, Michael Jefferies, come in. They had decided to buy a club on Eighth Street in the basement of a theater. Jimi was playing there so much and running up such a tab that they just decided to buy the club. Jimi turns to Michael and says why don't we get the guy who designed that club? I got a call the next day from Jefferies to design the club. I had a meeting with both of them and started designing a club, Electric Ladyland. At the last minute, the club gets scrapped due to the efforts of Eddie Kramer, who produced and engineered Jimi's records. The next thing you know, I'm designing a studio. I took two months off my job and took a crash course in the world of studio design, which in 1968 was not a particularly big world, and started designing and building Electric Lady, which opened a year later."<!--end paragraph--><!--begin paragraph-->

scoutship
04-22-09, 01:52 AM
I will leave the sorting out of historical accuracy to others.

And who would blame you? It is certainly one tangled weave of a clusterf(rea)k. I like the first hand accounts, too, incidentally---when they're actually first-hand. :)

Cerebrum btw opened in November of 68 (city license for a "studio"); Electric Lady officially opened August 26 70 (to spell it out: Yes, that is a clue lol). In Ultimate Hendrix Mr. Storyk refers to some mob-related reasons why Cerebrum, which was at 429 Broome (isn't Google Maps a sweet tool?) lasted only 9 months, and similar problems with W 8th Street establishments are expanded on by some others.

cheers---eh?

stplsd
04-22-09, 05:06 PM
I will leave the sorting out of historical accuracy to others.

Yeah, no probs, man


I enjoy all the first hand accounts regardless of inconsistencies.

I'm sure we all do, but, you know, maybe curiosity killed the cat.. but some of us just got to wonder why, why, why...

Roland Stone
04-23-09, 03:02 PM
It's February 11, 1969 sometime between midnight and dawn in NYC. Imagine you're riding with Jimi in the back of his chauffeur driven limo. Jimi turns on the radio and twists the dial til it lands on the soothing soft hypnotic voice of Allison "Nightbird" Steele on WNEW-FM. A Janis Ian song is just ending:

". . . that was Janis Ian and "Mistaken Identity". That's really one of the problems we all have today - to know who we are. Who are you? Hmm? Do you know who you are? And where you're at? That's a big order. And sometimes I think that if we all could have a focal point, a spot to zero in where we know we can touch reality, it would be a lot easier to find out exactly who we are, where we're at, and consequently where we're going. You can't know where you're going until you know where you're at, right?

So, some very bright people have come up with a most unusual idea. Possibly the right idea to put you in touch with reality. And that idea is CEREBRUM. What is CEREBRUM? It's an electronic studio of participation, and its at 429 Broome Street. That's easy to reach, its three blocks right above Canal Street and one block East of Broadway. What happens at CEREBRUM? I'll tell you:

You knock on a door: [At this point in the ad, watery echo sound fx, bells and bird calls, wordless chants and ethnic percussion start playing in the background and throughout the rest of the ad.] They ask your name. You give it. You're presented with a diaphanous white robe and invited to shed as much or as little of your clothing as you choose. You put on that robe and you're escorted into a long white room. No chairs, no tables, just carpeted white platforms. Lights? Yes. Music? Yes. I'll tell you what you don't do. You don't eat. You don't drink. You don't smoke. You don't dance. And you don't see a show. You communicate. You look for reality. What happens in that long white room at Cerebrum depends upon you and the other people that are there. The idea is to touch, to feel, to think, to communicate.

Much has been said about it. Time Magazine said "It's a mind-boggling scene, a downy mattress for the mind." East Village Other says "It's one of the most mind-blowing scenes yet contrived by man." Even Vogue says "The effect is mesmerizing." Try it. Look for reality at CEREBRUM. Two 3 hour sessions nightly. 8 to 11 and 11:30 to 2:30 am. Reservations are necessary. Call 966-4031. But above all get to CEREBRUM. [Ethnic drums climax and a female voice moans in ecstasy!]

Allison Steele, the Nightbird, WNEW-FM 102.7 on your dial Metromedia stereo in New York. It's the new groove and we're in it together until six o'clock . . . [segues into "Job's Tears" by The Incredible String Band]

ap0llo
04-23-09, 05:19 PM
Far out, man... 8)

stplsd
04-24-09, 10:33 AM
It's February 11, 1969 sometime between midnight and dawn in NYC. Imagine you're riding with Jimi in the back of his chauffeur driven limo. ........etc

o'clock . . . [segues into "Job's Tears" by The Incredible String Band]

Lovely. Authentic sounding stuff, but so much more enjoyable, if we knew where it came from and could read it ourselves, rather than it being dished out from upon high, know what I mean?

Roland Stone
04-25-09, 01:08 AM
Lovely. Authentic sounding stuff, but so much more enjoyable, if we knew where it came from and could read it ourselves, rather than it being dished out from upon high, know what I mean?

I figured it was self-explanatory based on my previous messages. It's a direct transcript (trancribed by me) from Allison Steele's WNEW-FM radio show from February 11, 1969. Yes its quite lovely, and its authentic sounding because its the real thing. I've got over 2 hours of her show that night in EX+ stereo. It's not that hard to find, if you collect vintage underground radio, but I don't think I can post it here because the music it contains has all been commercially released. So I just typed up that little transcript myself.

If I recall correctly there's at least one more slightly different ad for Cerebrum later on in the show.

I often listen to vintage 60's radio from the NYC area and wonder whether Jimi heard it too. I've got a great broadcast from March 3, 1966 where one of the songs played is Tim Rose's version of "Hey Joe" and its just spooky how close it sounds to Jimi's version, right down to the background voices. I wonder if Jimi was in the NYC area in March of 66?

stplsd
04-25-09, 03:08 AM
^
Many thanks for this detail, love it.
Didn't link your two posts, attention span deficit, on my part

Roland Stone
04-25-09, 09:42 PM
By the way, some doofus is selling vintage Allison Steele broadcasts at $40 a pop on Ebay. <grrrrr>

purple jim
04-26-09, 01:41 PM
Not only have no tapes of the music ever turnt up, the story told of the Experience improvising a piece of "appalling beauty" that left members of the audience in tears, and Jimi then solemnly laying down his guitar and walking off stage without a word (after the claimed "This is for a friend of mine" introduction), seems not to've occurred, either, despite the purported ear&eyewitness testimony of the gentleman doing lights for Soft Machine who has told it.
At least one newspaper covered that concert, and the photos exist.
Nice story though.

I have a video tape of The South Bank Show (Hendrix special) on which that scottish guy recounts the story. I could try and make an MP3 of it if y'all want to hear it.

scoutship
04-26-09, 06:15 PM
I have a video tape of The South Bank Show (Hendrix special) on which that scottish guy recounts the story. I could try and make an MP3 of it if y'all want to hear it.

It's on YouTube, one of the Jimi docs up there, don't have the link handy or recall which part it's in but I just watched it again a couple nights ago.

stplsd
04-26-09, 06:23 PM
the 'Scottish Guy' is Mark Boyle of the 'Sensual laboratory' light show that accompanied the Soft Machine. He does like a bit of drama.

MourningStar
04-27-09, 12:03 AM
I have a video tape of The South Bank Show (Hendrix special) on which that scottish guy recounts the story. I could try and make an MP3 of it if y'all want to hear it.That South Bank show is here at CCT in the Video Forum in DVD quality, fwiw.

purple jim
04-27-09, 12:41 AM
the 'Scottish Guy' is Mark Boyle of the 'Sensual laboratory' light show that accompanied the Soft Machine. He does like a bit of drama.

Are we to assume that he invented the whole thing ? Or was he so stoned that he imagined that's what happenned ?

Zelgadis
02-24-10, 04:25 PM
So this legendary song truly is just a legend huh? Too bad.

ap0llo
02-25-10, 03:49 PM
It seems that with such a large audience, somebody had to have a mic going. It's just wishful thinking really. But hey, given the chaos that surrounded the concert at the time (with MLK's assassination and all), sneaking a tape recorder in might have been the last thing on your mind.

MourningStar
02-25-10, 04:12 PM
If a recording of this gig exists it would definitely be the one to keep 'under wraps'. Who knows, maybe it will surface in a couple of hundred or so years. Perhaps it will make an appearance at the MLK Bicentennial celebrations!


;)

johanincr
02-25-10, 04:18 PM
Well the Theatre is still there, and they have a site, and people work there.....why not try something? Just sayin' .....

https://www.newarksymphonyhall.org/about-contact.shtml


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3198/4086057776_c42e565533_o.jpg

karsten
02-25-10, 04:30 PM
Great documentation.
Looks like the drums weren't mic'ed at all..

MourningStar
02-25-10, 05:03 PM
Great documentation.Agreed, although nothing meriting a recording of this to be 'kept under wraps' as I previously stated. I also see no reason not share the photos. Many Hendrix concerts were only captured by very few people. (which reminds me, I still gotta post my 69 LA Forum pix .... i'm so forgetful ... I need a reminder. hmmm, perhaps to coincide with the official VON release... when is that supposed to happen?)


:wave:

zombywoof57
09-05-10, 07:40 PM
i think Jimi's song Can i whisper in your ear show's what political feelings Jimi had, he was against war's so he did have some political feelings

Sharpstat
09-05-10, 11:00 PM
I thought I read that Jimi was suportive of the troops since he was a soldier at one time? Isn't that why he always dedicated machine gun to them in concert.

souldoggie
09-06-10, 02:52 AM
Morelmusic, very cool, thank you for the Generation ads.

manfree
09-06-10, 10:40 AM
Who is Georgie Same? Surely not Georgie Fame with a Typo?

Roland Stone
07-11-11, 09:42 PM
I often listen to vintage 60's radio from the NYC area and wonder whether Jimi heard it too. I've got a great broadcast from March 3, 1966 where one of the songs played is Tim Rose's version of "Hey Joe" and its just spooky how close it sounds to Jimi's version, right down to the background voices. I wonder if Jimi was in the NYC area in March of 66?

According to EarlyHendrix.Com:

4 March 1966
Atlantic Studios, New York City, New York
King Curtis with Cornell Dupree - guitar (rest of the personnel unknown) records "I Left My Heart In San Francisco", "The Shadow Of Your Smile" & "On Broadway" all tracks released on the lp "That Lovin' Feeling" Atco LP33-189, "On Broadway also released on the 45 "On Broadway / Quicksand" Atco 45-6406. Unknown if Hendrix participated.

30 March 1966
New York City, New York
Jimi signs a publishing contract with R.S.V.P. MUSIC, INC for the track "I Ain't Taking Care of No Business". He's credited as the sole composer for the song. The contract was offered for sale by Lelands.com in 2002. See the 1966 studio recordings -page.


Looks like Jimi probably WAS in NYC in March 66 and thus could have heard Tim Rose' "Hey Joe" on the radio.

zombywoof57
07-11-11, 11:09 PM
I figured it was self-explanatory based on my previous messages. It's a direct transcript (trancribed by me) from Allison Steele's WNEW-FM radio show from February 11, 1969. Yes its quite lovely, and its authentic sounding because its the real thing. I've got over 2 hours of her show that night in EX+ stereo. It's not that hard to find, if you collect vintage underground radio, but I don't think I can post it here because the music it contains has all been commercially released. So I just typed up that little transcript myself.

If I recall correctly there's at least one more slightly different ad for Cerebrum later on in the show.

I often listen to vintage 60's radio from the NYC area and wonder whether Jimi heard it too. I've got a great broadcast from March 3, 1966 where one of the songs played is Tim Rose's version of "Hey Joe" and its just spooky how close it sounds to Jimi's version, right down to the background voices. I wonder if Jimi was in the NYC area in March of 66? id love to hear it, if i was to send you a blank dvd can you data it to me pm me i'll give you my address

zombywoof57
07-11-11, 11:22 PM
According to EarlyHendrix.Com:

4 March 1966
Atlantic Studios, New York City, New York
King Curtis with Cornell Dupree - guitar (rest of the personnel unknown) records "I Left My Heart In San Francisco", "The Shadow Of Your Smile" & "On Broadway" all tracks released on the lp "That Lovin' Feeling" Atco LP33-189, "On Broadway also released on the 45 "On Broadway / Quicksand" Atco 45-6406. Unknown if Hendrix participated.

30 March 1966
New York City, New York
Jimi signs a publishing contract with R.S.V.P. MUSIC, INC for the track "I Ain't Taking Care of No Business". He's credited as the sole composer for the song. The contract was offered for sale by Lelands.com in 2002. See the 1966 studio recordings -page.


Looks like Jimi probably WAS in NYC in March 66 and thus could have heard Tim Rose' "Hey Joe" on the radio.
he was definately in NY on may,5th 1966 jamming at the Atlantic records release party with king curtis,cornel dupree, and percy sledge from the Roby book becoming jimi hendrix so could have been there in march?, i do know theres 4 songs with King Curtis and jimi

dino77
07-12-11, 01:23 AM
he was definately in NY on may,5th 1966 jamming at the Atlantic records release party with king curtis,cornel dupree, and percy sledge from the Roby book becoming jimi hendrix so could have been there in march?, i do know theres 4 songs with King Curtis and jimi

Not to be pedantic, but Jimi's only on the Help Me single (2 tracks). Can't hear him, though.

funkydrummer
07-12-11, 11:41 AM
Not political? Come on!

Wholeheartedly agree...Hendrix being Hendrix was a political act...

MourningStar
07-12-11, 11:57 AM
... Looks like Jimi probably WAS in NYC in March 66 and thus could have heard Tim Rose' "Hey Joe" on the radio.Well it's for sure Chas heard it, as the 'production' of the Hendrix studio cover is damn near identical, right down to, as you've pointed out, the backing vocals, as well as Mitchell's parts (tho, the Hendrix guitar riffs are straight from the Billy Roberts original).

Roland Stone
07-12-11, 10:13 PM
Which do you want to hear the WTRY 3-3-66 show with Tim Rose's "Hey Joe" or the Allison "Nightbird" Steele 2-11-69 WNEW-FM with the Cerebrum ads? They are both great shows, although the WTRY show is more mainstream while the Nightbird show is an underground delight. No matter, I'll upload them both to a Megaupload link. PM me if you want the link.

univibs
07-13-11, 03:34 AM
sorry to be the nasty guy but how relevant this to the main subject ?

Roland Stone
07-15-11, 08:20 PM
It was almost relevant in a tangential convoluted sort of way having to do with Janis Ian, the Generation Club and Cerebrum and Jimi's whereabouts when MLK was killed. But rather than trace the permutations that led here, let me just invite anyone interested in the Nightbird to hop over to this new thread:
http://www.crosstowntorrents.org/showthread.php?5369-Allison-quot-Nightbird-quot-Steele-2-11-69-aircheck&p=57180#post57180