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View Full Version : Would you buy Hendrix "Rap"?



Nonhuman
05-09-09, 08:17 AM
I was so excited to stumble across a disc called "Hendrix Jazz Project" and enjoyed some twisted beatnick translation of The Wind Cries Mary etc.. However everything went horribly wrong in my ears, despite all the wonderful jazz noises and freedom there arose a wave of something so horrendous as to flip my lunch...dare I speak the word? Rap, uggh. It just wouldn't stop and I had to kill the disc and I'm contemplating an exorcism or at least a minor disinfecting of my hard drive.

Having graduated High School in 1977 when the legal drinking age was 18 and drivers licenses were made of paper facilitating easy changes to the date of birth section, we spent our fair share of time in the bars at age 16. Nothing was worse than traveling to the local bars in this backwoods community only to find every one of them sporting polyester and filled with that God forsaken stuff they called Disco. Any of our requests for a "Rock" song was returned with the in your face remark "Hey don't you know Rock Is Dead?" To which we replied, "Come on out to the parking lot, we'll show you dead." Today I retain zero tolerance for Disco, Rap and all other Disco Mutations.

So with the fresh horror of having subjected myself to the Jazz'Rap abomination from hell, I'm wondering...Would you buy Hendrix Rap? I'd rather listen to someone letting the air out of a cat.

Nonhuman

Ayler
05-09-09, 08:35 AM
I was so excited to stumble across a disc called "Hendrix Jazz Project" and enjoyed some twisted beatnick translation of The Wind Cries Mary etc.. However everything went horribly wrong in my ears, despite all the wonderful jazz noises and freedom there arose a wave of something so horrendous as to flip my lunch...

Try the World Saxophone Quartet Tribute: one of the best Hendrix cover CD I ever heard!

dino77
05-09-09, 09:06 AM
No way! No rap. In fact, I have a hard time coming up with any Hendrix cover I enjoy. At least anything that comes close to the original. Hm.

Nonhuman
05-09-09, 11:42 AM
Ayler,

Thank you very much for the recommendation, I will hunt that tribute down. I can never get enough tributes.

dino77,

I don't look for a tribute close to the original anymore. What really trips my trigger is to find an evolutionary translation. One of the most enjoyable ones I've found is by Vietnamese guitarist Nguyen Le and it is entitled: "Purple: Celebrating Jimi Hendrix". I can't do it justice with description, it has to be heard. It is currently listed on Pirate Bay in FLAC.

Have a great day everyone!

Nonhuman

kcox5342
05-09-09, 12:28 PM
Two words: Doriella DuFontaine.

Nonhuman
05-09-09, 12:41 PM
Two words: Doriella DuFontaine.

Yes I bought that disc many years ago for $5.99 used. Played it once, stuck it away and never touched it again.

Nonhuman

purple jim
05-09-09, 01:03 PM
I didn't really like that "Hendrix Jazz Project" thing and I am not a big fan of Hendrix tributes. I like Jean-Paul Bourelly's album and The Beautiful People sampling exercise was great fun. I'm not familiar with that World Saxophone Quartet tribute.

Nonhuman
05-09-09, 01:43 PM
I didn't really like that "Hendrix Jazz Project" thing and I am not a big fan of Hendrix tributes. I like Jean-Paul Bourelly's album and The Beautiful People sampling exercise was great fun. I'm not familiar with that World Saxophone Quartet tribute.

Do you mean the Defunkt Special Edition: A Blues Tribute To Muddy Waters/Jimi Hendrix? I recently downloaded that one but haven't listened to it yet.

Nonhuman

BURTCOBAIN
05-09-09, 02:10 PM
i actually think the album . .If 60's were 90's by The Beautiful People worked really well . .(the extended double dics version even better ) the samples were well thought out and affective . .it always brings back very warm memories ov some walm and wild days back in Camden (London) In the early 90's . .as far as rap is concerned . .each to their own taste i guess . .i actually prefer early KRS1 . .something that dosnt revolve around guns money women and all that ego crap . .

purple jim
05-09-09, 02:36 PM
Do you mean the Defunkt Special Edition: A Blues Tribute To Muddy Waters/Jimi Hendrix? I recently downloaded that one but haven't listened to it yet.

Nonhuman

No, I mean Bourelly's own tribute album. He does play on the Defunkt album which features only live performances (which didn't do anything for me).

stplsd
05-10-09, 07:02 PM
Heard a cool Voodoo Chile hip hop with samples in the 80's, must look it out. Nice to see there's many in the hip-hop scene, dig Jimi

RasFreeman
05-11-09, 03:22 PM
Nonhuman wrote
Today I retain zero tolerance for Disco, Rap and all other Disco Mutations. So with the fresh horror of having subjected myself to the Jazz'Rap abomination from hell, I'm wondering...Would you buy Hendrix Rap? I'd rather listen to someone letting the air out of a cat.

Rap music is not a mutation of disco, but a offshot of reggae.
Jamaicans have been chanting & toasting (Doriella Du Fontaine
is a form titled "jail toasts") long before Jimi put out his first recordings. They were ripping off the R&B DJ's "jive talk" they would catch on New
Orleans radio stations. Jamaican rappers are still called DJs to this day.
I did a term paper on the history of spoken word music a long time back and still laugh when I remember people in the 80's saying rap won't last and it's not music, but 30+ years later it's still here and has outlasted
most other music genres. Can you name another music form that
has pretty much remained in the same form since 1975 and still
tops the charts. I personally think Jimi would dig rap music. He
showed enough interest to perform on the Doriella Du Fontaine
track.

Prace & Love,
Ras Freeman

stplsd
05-11-09, 03:32 PM
^
In Jamaica and the UK in the sixties/seventies it was called Toasting and they were called DJs because that's what they were: DJs from competing 'sound systems' (mobile discos), likes of Big Youth, U-Roy and Judge Dread, they played other peoples songs, but sometimes instrumentals and dubs with the vocals taken off and they toasted over them bragging about their sound system or whatever, putting down the competition. Not ripping off Yankee radio DJs. It was an indigenous Jamaican thing, a part of Rock Steady, Ska and Reggae. Toasting/Rapping is a one way street, straight from Jamaica to the USA!

kcox5342
05-11-09, 04:29 PM
What about rap that samples Jimi? I was just listening to The Way We Swing by Digital Underground...

purple jim
05-11-09, 04:34 PM
Some of Jimi's own music has a rap-like feel to it don't you think ? His vocal delivery had that stabbing drive: "Crosstown Traffic", "Power Of Soul", "I Don't Live Today", even "Purple Haze"

RasFreeman
05-11-09, 06:35 PM
Not to go off topic too much
Sound Systems in the 60s/70s you are right, I'm talking late 50's
here - pre reggae, when Jamaican R&B was the sound of the island.
All the original DJs (Count Machoki, King Stitt) say they copied
stateside DJs and the writers of Jive Magazine. Sorry if ripped off is
a strong term, it's what I could come up with at the time. Another
Jimi-Reggae connection. Jimi was versioned himself in 1966 when
reggae artist Owen Gray used the instrumental from the Ray Sharpe
track Help Me for his own song also titled Help Me.

I also agree some of the BOG tracks have a hip hop feel. I could
always imagine Snoop Dogg rhyming over Power Of Soul with no
problem. The Digital Underground track is a great use of Who Knows.
The one rap song I remember that samples Voodoo Chile (SR) is
Seven Bizzos by Two Live Crew. WACK. Surprised that EH never
went after them for the uncleared sample. Van Halen & the Roy
Orbison estate both went after them with varying success (VH won,
Orbison did'nt)

Peace & Love,
Ras Freeman

Nonhuman
05-11-09, 08:12 PM
RasFreeman,

Nice to see some people whom sincerely like Hendrix music can stand clearly on the opposite side of the fence from me when it comes to Rap. I'm a little confused though, what genre exactly has Rap outlasted? I can't name even one. Blues, R&B, Folk, Rockabilly, Country, Bluegrass, etc have all originated before Rap, and remain intact.

Perhaps your commentary is based on the critical assumption that what's on the charts is relevant and that's where I'm diametrically opposed. In 30+ years the last place I have ever found anything pleasing to my ears was on the charts. Isn't what sells the most strategically marketed to the average person with mediocre attention span and poor listening skills?

By definition top 40 is a measurement of sales, and the last time I looked the human race was entrenched in herd mentality. In fact I'm constantly amused at what chart music calls R&B, I mean for goodness sake most of the people I see listening to that stuff wouldn't know a Sam Cooke song if it fell out of the sky, landed on their face and started to soooothe them. Ahh Sam Cooke, if God had a voice he'd sound like Sam Cooke.

I enjoyed your reggae historical discussion. I haven't been successful in developing an appreciation for reggae or classical music either. However unlike Rap and Disco I can listen to it and call it pleasant but I wouldn't buy it or feel excitement stir at the thought of puting it on the hi-fi. I have the darndest little quirks when it comes to music. I can't stand to listen to Frank Sinatra but Love to hear Dean Martin. I love everything that John Fogerty did except his Blue Moon Fever album that was so popular, I literally hated it. I have every song that Hank Williams Sr ever did but it would take better than 6 good men to force me to listen to a top 40 country station. No sir not unless there's someone like Alison Krauss and Union Station, or Emmylou Harris on it. This top 40 chart corporate controlled crap radio ain't for me. Most of it vexes me dreadful.

Have a great evening everyone, hope you find everything you want from music. I know I will. Even if none of it's on the radio.

Nonhuman

purple jim
05-12-09, 12:53 AM
The only rap works that I have ever liked were "The Message" by Grandmaster Flash and "Rapper's Delight" by The Sugar Hill Gang and that's going back a bit.
I LOVE Frank Sinatra.

stplsd
05-12-09, 05:39 PM
Not to go off topic too much
Sound Systems in the 60s/70s you are right, I'm talking late 50's
here - pre reggae, when Jamaican R&B was the sound of the island.
All the original DJs (Count Machoki, King Stitt)

Read the article in the BBC which sounds like the original? It says DJs in the (late) 50s "borrowed" the style from the US Djs but then changed it vastly and made it their own. But they weren't toasting/rapping like we call it. The Toasting/rapping Djs (because that's what they were: DJs) from the sound systems in the 60s/70s didn't copy, they created. Same as the musicians didn't copy US R&B but created their own musical styles - ska, reggae etc.

http://www.niceup.com/history/bbc/toastingsmc.html

Seven Bizzos by Two Live Crew. WACK. is not just the record I'mthinkin' of

Just found it. It was all a long time ago, really more a dance R&B number, though sounds like The Message in parts it's from 1990 - 'Voodoo Chile' by 'Kiss the Sky' (Paul Hardcastle) feat. Jaki Graham. Sounds like's he heard the 2 live crew.
Just looked up the earlier 2 live crew, heard this too, but name bizzos not. prob mixin up wid dis in my ecstasy memories)

Peace

stplsd
07-02-09, 03:54 PM
Didn't know the Beastie Boys had a Hendrix tribute featuring several samples inc Curtis Knight stuff - 'Jimmy James' - Nice!

Also this short rap history of Jimi- Check it out!: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WAd0r21kHs