PDA

View Full Version : 05. POP NORTH



stplsd
01-15-18, 07:20 PM
Monday 30 January 1967
London, Studio S2, BBC Broadcasting House.
Insert for ‘Pop North’, broadcast 9 February from BBC Hulme, Playhouse Theatre, Manchester.
Producer: [unknown]
Engineer: [unknown]

Hey Joe (83), Rock Me Baby (09i), Foxy Lady (lost)

RM: Right now we’ve got one of the greatest-eh, new sensations to hit the scene in a long, long time.
They’re the third of this week’s special guests and they’re known as, ‘The Jimi Hendrix Experience’.
Aud: [cheers]


HEY JOE* (William ‘Billy’ Roberts)

Hey-hey Joe, where you goin’ with that gun in your hand?
Hey-hey Joe, I said now, where you goin’ with that gun in your hand?
I’m goin’ down to shoot my ol’ lady
You know, I caught her messin’ ‘round, messin’ ‘round another man
Yeah, better put her down
You know I’m goin’ out to shoot my ol’ lady
You know, I caught her messin’ ‘round another man
An’-uh, that ain’t too cool

Hey-ey Joe, I said now, I heard you shot your woman down
Shot her down now
Hey-hey Joe, I said, I heard you shot your woman down
You shot her down to the ground
[...? what he said?]
Yes, I did, I shot her
You know, I caught her messin’ ‘round, messin’ around town
[Shoot her when you know?]
Yes, I did, I shot her
You know, I caught her messin’ ‘round, messin’ around town
And I gave her the gun, huh, I shot her

[Solo]

Yeah, shoot her again now

Oh, Yeah

All right

Hey-hey Joe, I said now, heh-heh
Oh-Where you gonna run to now, where you gonna go?
[Right now?]
Hey-ey Joe, I said, where you gonna run to now?
Where you goin’ to go?
Ah, let me tell you, I got to split
I’m goin’ way down south, way down to Mexico way
Yeah, got to make it
I’m going way down south, way down where I can be free
Ain’t no one gonna find me
Ain’t no hangman gonna
He ain’t gonna put a rope around me, baby
You better believe, babe
Oh, yeah, now
Goin’ way down south
Way down where I can be, I can be free
Oh, let me tell you now, ow!
Yeah
Goodbye, baby

*Hendrix acknowledged that he used Tim Rose’s [one of “The Village people”] uniquely slower arrangement,
including some of his minor lyric changes and the addition of harmony backing vocals. Previous releases by
‘The Leaves’, ‘Love’ and ‘The Byrds’ were very much faster, had slightly different lyrics and didn’t feature,
harmony vocals.

Aud: [cheers]
RM : Yeah, Hey Joe, the fantastic chart smash there. And we’ll be having that experience again in Pop North later.
[...]
RM: The very best of them now as we cut loose again with the fantastic ‘Jimi Hendrix Experience’
Aud: [cheers]


ROCK ME BABY ((Riley) ‘BB’ (Blues Boy) King*)

Yeah
Rock me, baby, rock me all night long
Yeah
Rock me, baby, rock me all night long
Yeah
Rock me, baby, rock me all night long
Oh, shit
Roll me, ba-aby, like a wa-agon wheel
Ow!
Roll me, ba-aby, like a wa-agon wheel
Hey
Roll me, baby
You don’t know how good you make me feel
Awe, shucks

Ow!

[Solo]

Pull back [?]

Yeah

[Tape finishes]

*Hendrix played on the Chitlin’ Circuit’ with BB on the bill and also jammed with him later several times.
‘BB’s song ‘Rock Me Baby’ was the musical basis for his later song ‘Lover Man'’ aka ‘Here He Comes’.
Lyrics to Lover Man are a mix of Elmore James’s ‘Look On Yonder Wall’ (James ‘Beale Street’ Clark) and
Howlin’ Wolf’s ‘Meet Me In The Bottom’ aka 'Down In The Bottom’ (Willie Dixon), both songs have a similar
theme and chorus. Jimi later added a verse of his own: ‘I wanna love you longer’ etc. Jimi related this
song to the Vietnam war veterans returning, as ‘Look On Yonder Wall’ did to those of World War 2, the
missing verse being: “Your husband went to the war, I know it was tough, I don’t know how many
men he killed, but I know he done killed enough.” Ha-ha-ha;)
Interesting that when Jimi was playing in New York City in The Village, at the same time as
Butterfield & Hammond, 'Look On Yonder Wall' was already on release by Butterfield Blues Band and
'Meet Me In The Bottom’ was also on release, by John Hammond, on their respective electric blues
LPs, '’Paul Butterfield Blues Band' and ‘So Many Roads' (both 1965). Coincidentally, in 1964 the Stones
cut a version of ‘Meet Me In The Bottom’, but it was only released many years later.