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View Full Version : 24 August 1970 to ∞ (part III)



stplsd
10-27-10, 12:52 PM
[Day?] OCTOBER 1990
US
JIMI HENDRIX: ELECTRIC GYPSY by Harry Shapiro (& Caesar Glebeek)
Only mention of murder was that: “ ‘Murder’ was on the lips of a few people – he was killed by the CIA, the FBI, the Black Panthers and the mystical ‘they’, normally meant to indicate Mike Jeffery. Again, there is no evidence for such conspiracy theories.” Conclusion: Accident.
The mysterious “Debbie Toomey” is introduced with no supporting reference.
Monika says (as usual) she fell asleep at 07:00[ie approximate time of death] Says that [SHE WENT FOR CIGS AND IT WAS A FEW MINUTES AFTER SHE CAME BACK THAT SHE FIRST NOTICED VOMIT]. Mentions again that she tried to call his doctor, messed around looking for his number, but gave up and phoned “Somebody” [Monika doesn’t give Alvinia’s name] to get the number of “a good doctor”, but she wasn’t there, but was given Burdon’s number where “she” was staying, asked her whether she knew Jimi’s doctor’s number or another “good doctor, [Alvinia] said “No,” then she said she would quickly call an ambulance as Jimi had been sick and wouldn’t wake up. Then she says Burdon got on the phone and said “No way I should get an ambulance, and I said ‘I’m going to get one.’ he said ‘Well then call your so-and-so ambulance.’ He really was mad.”
“Walter Price (Accident and Emergency admissions officer [porter])... ‘The ambulance turned into the hospital, the two ambulancemen [ie Jones & Saua] jumped out and rushed into Casualty. Two doctors [ie Siefert & Brown?/Bannister?] went out there, tried to revive him but couldn't. I heard them say later that he had died in the ambulance. They took him straight down to the mortuary. He never left the ambulance. That's definite.’ Later interview – “ I took him to the mortuary.” [ie they never worked on him in the Casualty ward, but took him straight to the mortuary, see Dr. Siefert “We just worked on him for a few minutes, he was dead.”) Bob Brown, and Bannister’s original statement (“he was dead...any attempt at resuscitation was merely a formality”)]” [I][His statement doesn’t fit with anyone’s agenda, he hasn’t anything to hide from, and it certainly fits with the reality - Unknown male, obviously dead for quite some time, obviously from inhaling vomit after an overdose, no point wasting time in a bizarre sham, take his (obviously dead) body to the morgue) [no mention of wine]
“As the admissions officer, Mr Price would have made out a patient's admission card if Jimi had been brought into the hospital. No such card was made out because officially Jimi was never admitted to the hospital. In his jargon he was DOA - Dead On Arrival.”
According to Tony Brown in The Final Days the only document available from the hospital is the Admissions Book in which the only details entered are Jimi’s name, age, time and date of admittance. There is no reproduction or photo of this admittance book entry, just Tony’s description of this content, he doesn’t say where he got this strictly confidential info from.]
Dr. Seifert’s original statement is “inbetween”: "Jimi was rushed in the re-suss room. He was put on the monitor but it was flat. I pounded his heart a couple of times, but there was no point in doing anything else, as he was dead. I vaguely remember the clothes being flamboyant, but not too well because that isn’t what you concentrate on, and there was a good bit of mess. [no mention of wine]
We didn’t work on him anything like an hour, just a few minutes, he was dead.” see Dr. Bob Brown, Walter Price, and Bannister’s original statement (“merely a formality”)


Compare with:
Dr Bannister (while being investigated, and soon to be reprimanded for several cases of medical malpractise and struck off for fraud) [see link for tribunal details:
http://www.nswmb.org.au/resources/54...%20-%20COA.pdf (http://www.nswmb.org.au/resources/542/Bannister%20-%20COA.pdf)] in his 1992 letter to Harry Shapiro—written while he was either being investigated, and/or already suspended pending his tribunal for fraud and medical malpractice, in an obvious attempt to quell Monika’s accusation that Hendrix was treated negligently at the hospital, at this particulary awkward time for him): “On his admission he was obviously dead..”.[...], even so he says they attempted resucitation, cardiac massage and suction, but “...the attempt to resuscitate him was merely a formality...”.[ie they tried everything except a tracheotomy, but didn’t work on him very long, because he was already dead.] “there was red wineand gastric contents exuding from his mouth... considerable amount of alcohol [neatly getting in this loaded word, ie ‘alcoholic’] in his pharynx and larynx” [..] it was obvious he had drowned[a term not normally used unless he had been immersed under liquid, ie the sea, a river, a vat of malmsy wine etc.] in his own gastric contents.” [...] He then goes on to describe a gory scenario with “red wine that oozed from his stomach and his lungs.” again using the term drowned and leaving out mention of “and gastric contents” he belatedly slips in that he “felt he had been on sedative tablets” ie a loaded term a drug user was “on” something] “for sleep or otherwise” [ie suggesting he might have taken them for “kicks”] He never mentioned them subsequently, totally focussing on the wine;-) He then moves onto the obvious reason for his invention of and focus on the “drowning”on “large amounts of red wine”: “I note in your book that someone suggested that he should have had a tracheotomy [ie a further accusation of medical malpractice, by Dannemann, on top of those he was alrady being investigated for. She focuses on the doctor in charge (ie Bannister) for her criticism, also implying he is racist. He doesn’t mention that he had obviously also read her statement about Jimi drinking wine in this chapter of the book;-)]. He would not have responded to such treatment and it was not even a possibility. I suspect that he had been dead for quite some time before he reached the hospital and there was no indication to proceed to a tracheotomy.” [ie a tracheotomy was not possible due to the large amount of liquid (red wine) in him, and anyway he was DOA - he doesn’t labour the point so as not to make it too obvious he’s only covering his arse. This letter is primarily worded for any medical practitioners who may read it] “I do not believe that he was admitted into hospital and that he was taken to the morgue directly from Casualty (ie Accident & Emergency).” So, what he is really doing here is covering himself from a further accusation, ie he’s covering himself four times over:1.He was dead before he got to the hospital, 2.They tried everything except a tracheotomy ie resucitation,cardiac massage and suction 3. He was unsaveable anyway due to the amount of wine in his lungs and stomach, ie covering himself for the accusation that he should have performed a tracheotomy 4. He hints that it was his own fault - ie he was a drunk and likely a drug user—that’s what you get for drinking too much and using drugs. In a later interview he added another:# 5. Describing himself & others, bizarrely attempting to resuscitate an obviously long dead corpse for half an hour! ie we [ie I] tried more than could reasonably be expected. This “half an hour” also obviously coming from Monika’s statement in the book. He never gave any hint that he thought there was anything suspicious, ie that anyone else was responsible for his death. Not until seventeen years later, nearly 40 years after the event, in 2009, coinciding with the publishing of ‘Rock Roadie’;-). When he said he thought the ‘murder by wine’ accusation “was possible”. Possible reason for this (not exactly overwhelming endorsement of the “murder by wine” theory) will be obvious to many, see 2009 entry;-). In the same interview he says that the man was very tall, hanging over the table by 10 inches! — Jimi was only 5’ 11” (at most)] see his original statement (“merely a formality”), Dr. Siefert “We only worked on him for a few minutes, he was dead.”) Dr. Bob Brown and Walter Price.
[Dr. Bob Brown 2009 interview: questioned on whether Hendrix was murdered: “Surely not. No.” [he goes on to say it’s very far fetched ie “a long bow to draw”...] “It wasn’t as if there was something to be done about it, there simply wasn’t any medical remedy. I went off to attend to another man who’d fallen or jumped in front of a train who was still alive, and left Jimi Hendrix, he was looked after by other people, and [he was] gone.” [ie dead]. [no mention of wine] See Walter Price


[Date?] November 1990
UK
BUCKS ADVERTISER (retired PC)Ian Smith: “We went to a basement flat in Lansdowne Crescent... Hendrix was on the floor, lumped out, The ambulance people were already there and as far as they were concerned he was already dead. We went back later and from what we could gather, Jimi and the girl had had a bit of an argument and he’d stormed off to cool down. When he came back, he took a sleeping tablet and went to bed. Then she went out, and when she came back, he’d been sick and she couldn’t wake him.”

[Date?] 1990
UK
ARE YOU EXPERIENCED by Noel Redding
Noel gets the autopsy drugs info hoplessly muddled (like most others), and appears to have accepted most of Monika’s version. But then he goes on to mention all the different scenarios: ie murder (CIA/FBI/insurance,ie Jeffery & Chandler, Mafia – Sam River’s theory?), or suicide – he feels this unlikely, but doesn’t rule it out either. He’s not convinced by any of the arguments.

[Date?] 1990
UK
THE HENDRIX EXPERIENCE by Mitch Mitchell
He feels it was an accident rather than suicide, but that some things seem odd about it.



[Day?] SEPTEMBER 1991
UK
NEWS OF THE WORLD [Sunday gutter press, scandal rag] Front page: Jimi: Huge drugs overdose.] ‘Hendrix Death Case Reopened’ (‘News Of The World Rock Star Sensation’) ‘Girl Fans’ New Evidence’ by Keith Chapman:
Detectives will tomorrow re-open investigations into the death of rock legend Jimi Hendrix—21 years after he was killed by drugs."The shock twist follows the amateur sleuthing of TWO MISS MARPLE-style fans who claim to have uncovered vital new evidence... the two girl sleuths are Kathy Etchingham and Dee Mitchell [wife of Mitch Mitchell]... Kathy and Dee have traced the two ambulancemen who are adamant Hendrix was dead when they arrived at the flat.

[Day?] SEPTEMBER 1991
France
CHANNEL 5 TV interview Walter Price he again states Jimi was DOA

[Day?] OCTOBER 1991
US
STRAIGHT AHEAD "What Really Happened?" editorial note:
“Kathy Etchingham, a close friend/lover of Jimi's, and Dee Mitchell, Mitch Mitchell's wife, spent many months tracking down former friends and associates of Hendrix, and are convinced they have solved the mystery of the final hours."


[Day?] JANUARY 1992
Australia
Bannister being investigated/suspended pending his tribunal for several counts of medical malpractise and fraud (for which he was struck off), and possibly hearing the case might be re-opened, became worried and after reading Monika’s accusations of malpractise in Electric Gypsy panicked thinking that this might additionally influence the tribunal, wrote to Shapiro (see above comments) obviously an attempt to establish an alibi for not conducting a trachotomy. He apparently hadn’t been in contact with the other witnesses. As none of them remember any wine, or the half an hour resuscitation attempt on a long dead corpse.

[Day?]SEPTEMBER 1992
US
KPFA broadcast interview Burdon :"The only thing I remember specifically and clearly is [Monika's] car was parked outside and it was a cold morning and the fog was in the back window of the car, and [Jimi] had written in the window on the car, on his way down to the apartment the night before, he'd written 'LOVE' on the back window of the car.

[Date?] 1992
US
JIMI HENDRIX: SETTING THE RECORD STRAIGHT by John McDermott with Eddie Kramer
Walter Price isn’t even mentioned.
Jim Marron (manager of Electric Lady studios): On Jimi leaving Mike:
"Quite frankly, I don't think Hendrix wanted to take the financial risk that a management change represented. He would have much preferred to [tinker] with his current situation rather than go broke. Douglas's taste in music leaned heavily toward American jazz, and quite honestly, Hendrix could have been a great jazz player, but he had been a starving artist before and wasn't interested in going that route again. There was no money in jazz at that time. There still isn't."
On Jimi’s death:
"I was in Spain with Jeffery and we were supposed to have dinner that night in Majorca. He called me from his club in Palma saying that he would have to cancel. I said, 'Mike, we've already made reservations.' He said, 'Well ... there is good reason. I've just got word from London. Jimi's dead.' I said, 'What!' He said, 'I always knew that son of a bitch would pull a quickie,’ I was stunned. 'A quickie?' 'Yeah, look at that! He's up and done it!' Basically, he had lost a major property. You had the feeling that he had just lost a couple of million dollars - and was the first to realize it. My first reaction was, 'Oh my God, my friend is dead,’
The next day I met with Jeffery to assess what exactly had happened. Being away from London, and having traveled in such shady circles himself, Jeffery didn't know if Hendrix's death had been a hit or just his own misadventure. He told me that he was going to conduct his own investigation and that I should trust no one.
Jeffery found Jimi's death hard to accept. As his personal manager, the image of his million-dollar rock star drowning in his own vomit was ugly and hard to dismiss. Though he knew Hendrix had neither committed suicide nor been murdered, he never went public with his feelings because they would have hurt his record sales. Jeffery didn't want to tell the truth - as ugly and simple as it was - because he was afraid that it would pop the bubble. He believed in mystique; it was the basis of his entire management-marketing technique. When people didn't know the answers, they created mystique, and Jeffery felt that to keep them interested, you always had to keep them guessing.
He [Jeffery] wanted a key-man insurance policy that - should one partner die - made one million dollars available to either partner to buy out the full interest in the company."
[I’ve already discussed Trixie, “Morrison” & Levine’s other statements above]
Bob Levine: “When we were in Hawaii filming Rainbow Bridge [what was Bob doing there? no one else mentions him being there], Jeffery was trying to get Jimi to sign a million-dollar insurance policy [insurance on what?]. I had bad feelings about it and warned him not to sign. I then later confronted him in Oahu, [So. Bob was Jimi’s confident and advisor, swanning about Hawaii? able to “confront” him, I don’t think so.] asking if he had signed any agreements, and he said, 'Just some performance contracts that I was behind on.' I was relieved, but I still warned him to look out for it. I knew Jeffery not only had power of attorney over Jimi [no more than was stated in his managerial contract and in this respect quite unremarkable ie he was authorised to book concerts, sign contracts, recieve monies etc. in Jimi’s name], but, in trying to finish the movie, had borrowed himself to the limit [why would Jeffery divulge how much cash he had to this lowly employee that he didn’t fully trust— apparently with good reason]. I was afraid Jeffery would try to get money against Jimi's life, using the policy as col­lateral." [ie a twisted way of saying Bob— allegedly, at this time, 1970— thought Jeffery might borrow cash signing over Jimi’s life insurance policy [if he got one] as surety, so, presumably whoever would lend the money would have to be registered as the beneficiary and ensure the instalments were paid and that Jimi would die in a manner that would definitely ensure them being paid (eventually, or unless they planned on him dying young/or an “accident”?) –bonkers]

[Day?] SEPTEMBER 1992
US
STRAIGHT AHEAD (Page ?) ‘The Etchingham/Mitchell Files’ [no mention of Price?] by Michael Fairchild:
Kathy Etchingham (Jimi’s British girlfriend) and Dee Mitchell (wife of drummer Mitch Mitchell) have provided new information and testimony the circumstances surrounding Jimi’s death. John Saua was one of the ambulance crew (2 men) who answered the call to 22 Landsdowne Crescent, London on the 18th September 1970. The call came in at 11:18 A.M. They arrived at 11:27 AM. John had only worked with Reg Jones for one month, as Reg Jones’ regular partner was in the hospital. John left that position shortly afterward and had no contact with Reg Jones since, nor were they particularly good mates at the time, being of different age groups. John still is an ambulance man.

John Saua’s Statement:

Well, I remember we had a hell of a time trying to suck him out, I mean the vomit was dry and there was a hell of a lot of it. The aspirators in those days were all right, but not like you have today. They couldn’t shift that lot.
We knew it was hopeless. There was no pulse, no respiration. We got down to the flat and there was nobody but the body on the bed, we had to radio for the police from the van, and we couldn’t touch anything in the flat. As I say we knew he was gone, he was on top of the bed dressed, but I didn’t recognize him. I don’t know if any anybody would’ve recognized him. His own mother wouldn’t have recognized him. He was in a pool of vomit, it was everywhere. But we are not doctors and it’s our job to keep trying till we get them to the hospital. We can’t proclaim anyone dead...so as soon as the police arrived we were off. I was in the back with Jimi, Reg Jones drove. When we moved him the gasses were gurgling. You get that when someone has died, it wasn’t too pleasant. The vomit was all the way down. We couldn’t have got an airway down. He was flat on his back when we got there. It’s a shame he wasn’t on his side because he might have pulled through.

Questions for John Saua:
.
Q: Did you sit Jimi up in the ambulance?
A: Of course not, but I really kept on trying to do what I could for him even though we knew it was useless. I was really sorry there was nothing we could do to help.
Q: Why have you never talked to the press or come forward?
A: What do you mean come forward? I would never talk to the press, well you can’t in our job. We sign a conditions of service agreement. If we go into a building of national security, or a member of the royal family or a celebrity, we can’t talk about it, and quite right too. No one has ever asked me about it before anyway.
[John was then shown the account in the bio “Electric Gypsy” regarding Jimi’s death.]
A: Well that’s fiction isn’t it? What a load of old cobblers!
Q: Don’t you remember this girl (Monika Dannemann)?
A: No.
Q: Surely you remember this girl. Blond hair and a German accent.
A: Sorry, doesn’t jar anything or ring any bells with me.
Q: Did you speak to anyone on your way to the hospital?
A: Just the police before we left. A small crowd may have gathered. I can’t remember if some one asked what was happening, but you always get a crowd round an ambulance. It’s an unfortunate fact.
Q: Did anyone ride along to the hospital with you?
A: No, of course not, like who?
[no mention of wine]

Reg Jones was the other member of the ambulance crew who responded to a “possible O.D.” call at the 22 Landsowne crescent basement flat on the 18th of September 1970. He had worked for over 20 years as an ambulance man and has the highest reputation among his colleagues.

Reg Jones’ Statement:

Well it was horrific. We arrived at the flat and the door was flung wide open. Nobody about, just the body on the bed. He was covered in vomit. There was tons of it all over the pillow, black and brown it was. His airways was completely blocked all the way down. His tongue had fallen back you see. The room at first was dark...we had to pull the curtains.
Well we had to get the police. We only had an empty flat, so John Saua ran up and radioed and got the aspirator too. We felt for any pulse between his shoulders, pinched his earlobes and nose, showed a light in his eyes, but there was no response at all. I knew he was dead as soon as I walked in the room. You get a feel for it, I can’t explain, but you do and I knew he was dead. Once the police arrived, which seemed like no time at all, we got him off to the hospital as quick as we could. We just kept trying. My shirt was wringing wet. The ambulances in them days, they wasn’t equipped like they are now. We had them crazy wadhams (a type of ambulance) in them days, awful they was. We took him to St. Mary Abbotts, they don’t have a casualty ward now, but in them days they did. That was our designated hospital for the day. There was a “bed state”* at St. Charles. You found out at the beginning of your shift what your designated hospital was - St. Mary’s was the designated that day.

[*NOTE: A “bed state” meant that the casualty ward for a particular hospital was not open on a particular day - either through staffing or lack of beds, the designated hospital was the place the injured, or ill, would receive the fastest and most comprehensive care. Just to make sure the emergency services remembered, large highly visible colored disks were placed at the casualty entrance. Red was for closed and green meant open. St Charles was marginally closer, but there was a “bed state” and, as Reg Jones said, St. Mary’s was the designated casualty ward that day.]

Questions for Reg Jones:

Q: Did any one come along in the Ambulance with you?
A: No. John Saua was with Jimi, I didn’t know he was Jimi Hendrix, bit out of my age group, luv. When we got him to the hospital, full lights and sirens, we had to clean the ambulance out, it was really a mess, his bowels and bladder, all that goes when you’re dead. That flat must have needed a good cleaning too.
Q: Did you sit him up in the ambulance?
A: Sit him up! No luv, you don’t sit people up when they’ve choked. Them steps up the flat was steep, and you had a natural incline on the way up, but no, he wasn’t sat up.
Q: Did you see or talk to anyone in the flat or on the way?
A: Just the police and the hospital staff.
Q: What about the German girl?
A: What German Girl? We didn’t talk to no one but the police, and then at the hospital.
Q: This is a bit confusing - look at this (shown the account in the “Electric Gypsy” bio:
A: Well that’s just crazy that is. I wouldn’t know that girl if she was living next door to me. I’ve never seen her before. That’s wicked that is. I’ve lived long enough to know silly tongues will wag, but that is wicked. She wasn’t there, there was no one there.
Q: Have you ever had a situation like this before or since?
A: Well no, that’s why I can remember it quite well, just the body and no one around

Considering Friday noon traffic, and having a short wait for the police, they did an amazingly quick and efficient journey (18 minutes).

Ian Smith was one of a pair of police officers attached to Notting
Dale police station, responding to a call from ambulance H.Q. to
Notting Dale to go to 22 Landsdowne Crescent, London, Samarkand
Hotel. It took them about two minutes to arrive (probably less) as
the station was just behind Landsdowne Crescent and they were on
their way out the door to start their shift.
[no mention of wine]

Ian Smith’s Statement:

We went to a basement flat at Landsdowne Crescent. The ambulance men
were there, but Jimi was dead. It wasn’t very pleasant. They had to
take some of the bedding and wrapped it around his body as there was
a lot of mess. There was really nothing they could do for him. I
watched them put him in the ambulance and go off.

Questions for Ian Smith:

Q: Was there anyone with them (the ambulance men)?
A: No, I remember quite clearly the doors of the ambulance shutting
on the crew and Jimi.
Q: Were you aware of the fact that he was Jimi Hendrix?
A: No, I hadn’t a clue who he was. We really answered a lot of calls
like that in those days.
Q: Was there anyone in the flat besides Jimi and the ambulance men?
A: No we just shut the door after they left to close up the flat.
Q: Could you just read this account (shown “Electric Gypsy”)?
A: (laughs) Well, that’s not how I remember things. If she’d been in
the flat they would have never called us to come in. They could have
just taken him off, but in the circumstances, you know - just the
body. Well they radioed their control to get us in. Also he would
have been identified - nobody knew who he was.

Dr. Martin Seifert was one of the casualty doctors who attended to
Jimi Hendrix on the 18th of September 1970, at St. Mary Abbotts
Hospital, where he was the Medical Registrar. He was one of a team
of three doctors. Today he is an eminent Rheumatologist (a doctor
who deals with painful conditions of the joints and muscles).
[no mention of wine].

Dr. Martin Seifert’s Statement:

Jimi was rushed into the re-sus room. He was put on a monitor, but
it was flat. I pounded his heart a couple of times, but there was no
point in doing anything else, as he was dead.
I vaguely remember the clothes being flamboyant, but not too well
because that isn’t what you concentrate on, and there was a good bit
of mess.
I never spoke to, or saw, anyone about Jimi - No woman in
admissions. No nurse went out to say we’d revived him because we
didn’t - That just never happened. We didn’t work on him anything
like an hour, just a few minutes - He was dead. After we worked on
Jimi - we didn’t know he was Jimi Hendrix until later on - I
remember just a vague memory of a bit of fuss going on in
admissions, but it could have been anything, it was a casualty ward.
[After being shown the account in “Electric Gypsy”, Dr. Seifert had this to say.]
I can’t explain that all - It never happened. Who is this girl? No
one would have been allowed to look at him or stand over him. That
would never have been done. I would have done anything to save him,
but it was too late, he was dead.

Mr. Pergolani was working as a waiter at the Samarkand Hotel on
September 18th 1970.
[no mention of wine]

Mr. Pergolani’s Statement:

Jimi was staying in the hotel with Monika, his German girlfriend. I
was working here. That day, someone yelled out that Hendrix was
dead. The police came. The doctor said he took pills, but the reason
for his death was suffocation from his own vomit, because he
couldn’t move, he was laying on his back. Since then, almost every
week, people come here to see where Jimi died.

[NOTE: I would think that by “doctor” he means the ambulance
attendants. It’s curious that he says. “Someone yelled out that
Hendrix was dead.” That confirms the attendant’s claim, that they
knew Jimi was already dead at the scene. It’s also interesting to
note that he says, “Since then, almost every week, people come here
to see where Jimi died.”]
[no mention of wine]

Monika Danneman’s Statement:

On September 24, 1970, Monika Charlotte Danneman made the following
sworn statement:
I have known Jimi Hendrix for the past two years. I met him in Germany and we became friendly and when I came to England this year I got in contact with him and we resumed our relationship. Since Tuesday 15th September, he was living with me at my flat in Landsdowne Crescent. We went out on Wednesday and Thursday to Ronnie Scotts Jazz Club and had a meal and a bottle of wine each evening, and spent the evenings listening to music. On Thursday 17th September we stayed in and I cooked a meal of spaghetti and we talked until about 2am. He then said he had to go somewhere and see some people about his band and I drove him to a house in Great Cumberland place. I asked him if I could go with him, but he said that they were not very nice people. Later about 2:45am, I picked him up there and went home. On our arrival I made a sandwich and we talked until about 7am. He then said he wanted to go to sleep. He took some tablets and we went to bed. I woke up about 11am and saw that Jimi’s face was covered in vomit. I tried to wake him, but could not. I called an ambulance and he was taken to the Hospital in Kensington. He never recovered consciousness and later died at 12:45 pm. Prior to going with him to the hospital, I checked my supply of Vesperax [sic] sleeping tablets and found that 9 of them were missing. He was very happy and I never heard him talk of killing himself.

[NOTE: The other interviews and statements were conducted during July and August 1991. The people were shown the 1st printing of “Electric Gypsy” (1990).]
[only mention of wine was that Monka drank only one bottle a night]


[Date?] 1992
UK
JIMI HENDRIX: A VISUAL DOCUMENTARY by Tony Brown
He quotes all the above Straight Ahead interviews but there are some differences:
Differences and additions in John Saua’s statement in red older in italics: They had to take some of the bedding from around him.He was dressed but there was a lot of mess, so they just [and] wrapped it around his body [as there was a lot of mess. There was really nothing they could do for him. I watched them put him in the ambulance] and took him [go] off. There was really nothing they could do for him. We followed them up the stairs. I watched them put him in the ambulance and take off.
[The Q&A section is here presented as a statement]:
We closed up the flat as there was no one about
[A: we just shut the door after they left to close up the flat.]
We went back later. She (Monika) said they had an argument and he’d stormed off to cool down. When he came back, he took some sleeping tablets. Then she went out, and when she came back, he’d been sick and (she) couldn’t wake him. [this is actually PC Ian Smiths statement!]
We really answered a lot of calls like that in those days.
[A. We really answered a lot of calls like that in those days.] It really was just another call, I didn’t even know he was Jimi Hendrix.
[A: I hadn’t a clue who he was.]
If she’d been in the flat, they would never have called us to come, because they just could have taken him as normal. But because no-one was there, he was dead and circumstances were a little odd, suspicious they radioed their control to get us in.”
[A: If she’d been in the flat they would have never called us to come in. They could have just taken him off, but in the circumstances, you know - just the body. Well they radioed their control to get us in. Also he would have been identified - nobody knew who he was.]
[no mention of wine]

Walter Price: “I was the porter on duty at the Mary that afternoon. I was the last person to see Jimi Hendrix.” This significant downgrade of Price’s position and his earlier statement from Electric Gypsy, is not explained.
[no mention of wine]


[Day?] DECEMBER 1992
US
STRAIGHT AHEAD (Page ?) ‘WHY TAKE 5 HOURS TO CALL AN AMBULANCE?
An Interview with Kathy Etchingham’ [no mention of Price] by Michael Fairchild:

MF: Around this time, late February 1969, Monika Dannamann says that she was seeing Jimi in London, which I’m sure must have come as a surprise to you. Have you gone on record yet with any details regarding your research of Jimi’s last night, when he was with Monika?
KE: No, but did you see the article in Rock World? Well, that’s as far as it’s got, and I haven’t spoken to anyone. I don’t speak to anybody about it. I mean, the file is still lodged with the Attorney General, because although (Ken Voss) has written that they refused to re-open the case, we still have a right of appeal through the Attorney General to have a re-opening of the inquest, every person has that right and that’s what we’re doing, so it’s not a closed book by any stretch of the imagination. That’s the only thine I can say on that point.
MF: Do you have any idea how long it’s going to take?
KE: Well, these things move notoriously slowly, as you well know, it’s the same in America too, these son of things go very, very slowly. It could take up to a year or eighteen months for them to make a decision. It’s quite an ordeal, you know.
MF: Monika has raised some questions about the validity of the people claiming to be the ambulance attendants who found Jimi that morning.
KE: Well, would the London Ambulance Service make a statement (Jan. 3, 1992 letter) like that? Why would they want to protect two non-existant guys? I am sure they were telling the truth. Their stories were so similar yet they hadn’t seen each other for about twenty years. The important point though is about the report we got about the stomach contents.
MF: You’re talking about the original coroner’s report?
KE: We had it re-analyzed.
MF: The rice grains present in Jimi’s stomach indicate he died very early in the morning.
KE: It’s from the Director of Forensic Medicine at one of our leading hospital, and he studied under professor Teare (forensic scientist who presented original autopsy report) and he’s re-analyzed the findings, they’ve got new technology now, him and another guy who’s the Consultant Toxicologist, and between them they came up with the scenario that he had to have died within three hours of eating that rice. So that’s the clincher, isn’t it? Because he ate the rice before 3 a.m. [Henderson has Stella saying the food was Polynesian and that Jimi only ate some ~ 03:00. But if we take the account of rice only being bought by 12 at the latest, or earlier?, as Tony claims in his book (I don’t why a Chinese restaurant carry out service should not be open later in 1970 London at the weekend?) either it took a while to get the rice back from the restaurant/Jimi ate his later or this would mean Jimi dying at or on the way home from the party. I think Kathy has just got a bit carried away with Crompton’s evaluation to her, (Tony has him saying it takes four hours to empty the stomach) and made it out to be a more narrow definition than he might have expressed it. All these times are obviously approximate. Not everyone’s digestive system works at the same speed it may have been slowed by food he’d eaten earlier, as Monika mentioned, the drink he’d had earlier, the rice grains “discerned” being just a few hard fried grains resistant to digestion etc.]
MF: There needs to be a new inquest where all parties involved can be thoroughly cross examined against one another.
KE: Well that’s what we’re trying for. It’s bloody hard work. You can’t argue with an expert. What’s she going to do, say that Dr. Rufus Crompton doesn’t exist? That he’s not the Director of Forensic Medicine at St. George’s Hospital? I mean, after reading this (report) what would you think? It seems there was about five hours between the time of death and the ambulance being called. [ie 11:18 minus five gives 06:18 as TOD?]
MF: What was going on in that five hours?
KE: It’s very confused. We’ll never find out what happened because I don’t think she can tell us. Maybe she wasn’t there and when she came back she found him dead. Terry Slater told me that Jimi was lying on the bed dead while they were cleaning the place up. All we know is what she told us, but the story that she told us doesn’t make sense when you compare it with all the other evidence.
MF: Sometimes, in the mind’s eye, people recall bad events a certain way that allows them to deal with it.
KE: There’s a condition called post-traumatic shock syndrome, where people who have seen a really nasty accident, say a plane crash or something, they can see the crash, but they can’t see the mangled bodies, the mind blocks it out and some gets into sort of cold storage, as it were, and only hypnosis will bring it out. She said to Tony Brown, “Well, if I find these ambulance men. I shall ask them to be hypnotized.” So she knows about that too, see. Somebody might have said to her at some stage, her doctor possibly said, look, why don’t you go through hypnosis and try and find out what happened that morning. Because she may not know what happened that morning. Maybe she was completely zonked out of it as well. Eric Burden said to me, “I think I called the ambulance.” Now, the other thing - apart from the forensic evidence, which you cannot argue with, because they’re the experts - one of the other clinchers is, how come Gerry Stickles himself says that he was phoned early, 8 to 9 o’clock, by Terry Slater? Now, work that one out. Mitch Mitchell and Gerry Stickles say that they were called early. And Eric Burdon said that he got the phone call from Monika at the first light of dawn.
Gerry Stickles told Harry Shapiro that he went first to the Cumberland Hotel because he got a phone call from Terry Slater and Terry Slater said look, you better get over here, Jimi’s in big trouble. And he went straight to the Cumberland Hotel thinking Jimi was in trouble at the Hotel and been busted. Gerry Stickles said that he thought that “the hotel” was Jimi’s hotel; the Cumberland. He knew nothing of the Samarkand Hotel. Gerry Stickles said it was early - 8 to 9 o’clock - no later. Now, Terry Slater told me it was early. Eric Burdon told me it was early. Mitch Mitchell told me it was early. Gerry Stickles has said it was early. I’m sorry, I have to believe four separate people who said it was early.
MF: And the pathologist report supports what they’re saying.
KE: Absolutely, completely dovetails right in there and said that he must have been dead by 5:30 a.m. at the latest[this doesn’t tally with her above 6:18 TOD scenario, or the 3 hours digestion time v the supposed time of eating]. The doctors knew when he got to the hospital that he was dead, that was obvious. But the very fact that Dr. Bannister wrote that letter from Australia, quite independently, nobody interviewed him, he just saw the book (“Electric Gypsy”) in a bookshop, read it, and wrote a letter of protest [not a letter of “protest”, he was defending himself against Monika’s allegations that he badly treated at the hospital, and that he should have had a tracheotomy, his main concern, while promoting himself as valiantly attempting to save Hendrix against the odds, a man who he portrayed as having drunk himself to death “drowned” in “wine”, the quantity of “wine” making it impossible that he could have been saved with a tracheotomy, despite his strenous efforts (even though he’d already told us he had obviously been dead for some time!)] And it completely dovetails with what Dr. Seifert has said, [No, Siefert claimed Jimi was clothed, Bannister said he was naked. Bannister claimed it was he who attempted heart massage and sucked out “wine” to no avail, Siefert never mentioned wine and said it was he who “pounded his heart a couple of times, but there was no point, he was dead, no point in doing anything else.”[ie no point in suction, it wasn’t attempted]... for and they’d never seen each other since that day, dovetails with what the ambulancemen have said [No, there was no mention of “wine” and suction, or Jimi being naked in casualty by any of them except Bannister.], and they’d never even met them (the doctors).
MF: What happened in all those hours?
KE: This is it, you see, we’ll never find out, and that’s the frustrating thing. She’ll keep putting her own story forward, she’ll never give up. Eric Burdon said to me, “She will never, ever give up trying to prove that she was his fiance,” when in fact she wasn’t. She was a one night stand in Germany, and a one night stand in London, or two nights at the most. She’s not even trying to claim any more that she saw him in (February and March) 1969, not through her lawyers to my lawyers anyway. They met one night in Dusseldorf (Jan. 12,1969), and that was it (until 1970), because we’ve got Jimi on film the following night (Cologne Jan. 13, 1969) with somebody else [would be nice to see this film;-)].
MF: Nobody can place her in London during February and March 1969?
KE: No! Nobody can place her, and when she’s been asked for her passport, which would have been stamped in those days because it was before the EEC, she said, “Well, I don’t know where this is now “ I’ve got mine So much of her story seems made up. Like the claim that she walked into the Speakeasy and that I was there’ around near the bar when they went into the restaurant, which is a different pan of the nightclub. Now that could not have happened, because I had an account, which I shared with Jimi, we both could sign on the same account, and the account - the restaurant was run by different people to the club - so if I wanted to have a drink I would have to be in the restaurant to sign for it, do you understand? So I would never have been sitting around the bar. It was only groupies who sat at the bar. I would have been in the restaurant, because that’s where we always went, that’s where I held my account, that’s where I was. I mean, it never happened, and it’s bloody insulting. One of the things said in those manuscript drafts that bear her name, but which she now denies ever writing, is that Jimi told her, “I’ve got to go to Heathrow Airport to pick up my equipment at midnight. Heathrow Airport closes down at 11 o’clock, always has done and there’s no way that you can pick up anything after 11 o’clock. Nobody ever went down to the Speakeasy before midnight, see what I mean. It wouldn’t have been in mid-evening or anything like that. because we never went down there till very, very late - twelve, one o’clock. See? We’d go somewhere else in the evenings, and she’s related nothing about going anywhere else in the evening. See, it’s little mistakes like that.
MF: It seems that either her memory is very poor, or she’s fictionalizing a lot.
KE: She must be fictionalizing, because the thing was that Jimi didn’t go to restaurants, see that’s another thing Look, when you live with someone, you know what they’re like, and it’s quite clear to me that she didn’t know him very well, not like I knew him. Reading her descriptions of him. it becomes clear as a bell that this woman did not know Jimi Hendnx well at all, because he was a completely different character to the one she has portrayed. I did this interview for Q magazine (June 1992) and I said that Jimi had lots of girlfriends and it wasn’t a particularly attractive part of his character. Then I turn the page and I see Monika Dannamann say “It is not true that he had many girlfriends.” I mean, rubbish! Are we to ignore the photographic evidence? Her story would never stand up in a British court, nor in an American one, I don’t think. I know of no pictures of her with Jimi at all, apart from when they met, and it was just like a fan pose, if you look at it. And it’s been cut down and supplied it to everybody so it looks as if it’s just the two of them. But the full photograph has all these other people as well.
Mind you, I don’t know an awful lot of the photographic technicalities, but I certainly was there and there’s enough evidence to show that I was, and there’s enough people in the business that will say so. But nobody in the business knew Monika Dannemann.
MF: What about the post card that Jimi sent to her family?
KE. Only one! And he wrote it like he would write to a fan, and that was only on the 17th, the day before he died, and the way that he wrote on that card - “Hi. remember me?” you know, it means that he hadn’t seen (Monika s brother) since they met at the hotel the previous year. And it was very formal for Jimi, hardly the sort of words that you would write to somebody that you knew very well, or a member of the family. No, the whole thing comes across like a complete set-up. History has been altered and everybody’s fallen for it, because nobody s spoken up before. All the people over here know that. Her story’s been worked on for twenty-two years You can make up all kinds of fantasy over twenty-two years. I mean the fact is that her story now completely contradicts what has circulated in the manuscript drafts which she allegedly wrote, or which have been attributed to her since 1973! As far as I know, the only public statement she’s made recently is that she’s the fiance of Jimi Hendrix, and then sort of passing this letter around from Al Hendrix (In 1991 Monika visited Al and asked him to sign a statement acknowledging Monika as Jimi’s intended bride.) In none of those manuscript drafts is it claimed that she was his fiance. But now she is formally engaged, and denies having written those manuscripts, see?
[Day?] FEBRUARY 1993
US
STRAIGHT AHEAD (Page ?) ‘CHRISTIANS IN ROME’ [no mention of Price] by Michael Fairchild:

In an interview for KPFA radio, broadcast on Jimi's birthday in 1982, Eric Burdon discussed the morning that Jimi died and said:

"The only thing I remember specifically and clearly is [Monika's] car was parked outside and it was a cold morning and the fog was in the back window of the car, and [Jimi] had written in the window on the car, on his way down to the apartment the night before, he'd written 'LOVE' on the back window of the car. And I remember standing outside looking at the window of the car, you know, and I knew it was his handwriting."

In light of new evidence indicating that Jimi died before 5:30 a.m that morning, [more likely at least half hour later, quite possibly up to an hour and a half later] the above comments are of interest because we must wonder just how early it was when Burdon arrived at Monika Dannemann's flat and noticed "fog" on the car windows. On the day that Jimi died (Sept. 18, 1970), the temperature in London reached 74 degrees. One would expect that night "fog" would be burned away by the morning sun well before 9 a.m. If Burdon saw fog, he must have been at Jimi's death scene earlier. It will be of interest to obtain hourly temperature readings of London weather for that morning and determine precisely how early it was that Burdon arrived there. [Prior to Burdon's statement about the window fog everyone had been led to believe by Monika that she didn't realize Jimi was in trouble until past 11 a.m. that morning. Keep this in mind while reading what follows.]
In addition to Burdon's statement, we should also re-examine an interview that Amsterdam radio conducted with Monika on Sept. 19, 1975:
"We stayed home till about 12 o'clock," Monika said of that last night with Jimi, "and then I drove him to a flat of some friends of his, and he stayed there for about half an hour, and then I picked him up again. We talked till about 7 o'clock in the morning, and then I started to sleep, and I woke up about 9 o'clock and Jimi was still asleep and I just couldn't sleep, but after a while I realized that he got sick. Well, at first I tried to wake him up and I just couldn't, he didn't wake up, so I called the ambulance, which came after 10 minutes, and they checked him and I asked them if he would be alright again and they said yes, sure, there's nothing special about it, he'll be OK again. While we were driving in the ambulance they seated Jimi on a chair, but with his head backwards, which I found out only later that this was the worst position they could have put him in because he couldn't breath properly, because he had been sick. We got to the hospital and immediately got Jimi in a special room. At first they said to me he will be alright. I went to the doctors to ask what happened and they said he'd be alright, and then about a half an hour later they told me he was dead...I do believe that he got poisoned."

Contradicting Monika, both of the ambulance attendants who arrived on the scene that morning said that the flat was empty except for Jimi's dead body. Neither of these men have any recollection of ever having laid eyes on Monika. This is supported by the fact that they had to call the police. When a body is found in an empty flat, it is standard procedure for London Ambulance Service attendants to immediately call the police before anything at the scene is moved. The attendants were unable to identify the body, there was no one there to even say that this was Jimi Hendrix. And both attendants insist that they handled Jimi's body properly, laying him flat inside the ambulance, not upright "seated on a chair," as charged by Monika.
In addition, both of the attendants, as well as Ian Smith (the police officer who was called to the scene) swear that no one else rode along in the ambulance with Jimi's body, as Monika claims she did. What's more, Dr. Seifert, who tended to Jimi's body when it arrived at the hospital, insists that there was "no woman at admissions." Referring to Monika's claim that she was told at the hospital that Jimi was alright, and her claim to have gone in to view Jimi's body after being told of his death, Dr. Seifert insists, "No nurse went out to say we'd revived him...and no one would have been allowed to look at him or stand over him. That would never have been done."
Clearly, lies have been/are being told about the circumstances surrounding the death of Hendrix. In the face of all of these opposing accounts of that morning it is infuriating that the original 1970 inquest was such a botched up investigation. For more than 22 years we were left only with Monika's story of what happened. We have been led to regard the two ambulance attendants as everything from inept fools to criminally negligent conspirators. Having finally been tracked down and interviewed (as they should have been in 1970), the question is obvious: have these men been both libeled and slandered before an international audience for over two decades? What's more, has the general public's view of Jimi as the "drug addict zombie responsible for his own death" been the result of a cover up by "other hands" that were at play that morning? We don't know how Monika's nine sleeping pills got into Jimi's system. But in the absence for so many years of so many crucial testimonies to cross reference, public perception of his death remains outrageously manipulated.

If any one of the people with him early in the morning on Sept. 18, 1970 were more responsible for what happened (accident or foul play) than we've been led to believe, they have, until now, been successful in shifting that responsibility onto Jimi and forever condemned him to a public stigma of "irresponsible drug addict."

[Day?] December 1993
UK
THE (London) TIMES publishes an interview of Bannister [having been reprimanded for two counts of medical malpractise and struck off for fraud in 1992], in which he describes the scene in gorier, more sensationalist terms, with Hendrix being naked, and focusing entirely on his tracheotomy alibi, ie the red wine, leaving out the former “and gastric contents”, and sedatives. He now adds that he thinks Hendrix was naked apart from “something ... - whether it was a towel or a jumper around his neck -. That was saturated in red wine.” No one else mentions him being naked, in fact the opposite, that he was fully clothed;-). He also adds that, when “the medical staff” tried to clear his aiways with a sucker “it would just fill up with wine from his stomach.” The autopsy states that there was the remains of a medium size meal containing rice in his stomach – no mention of wine (with which it would surely have been mixed, unless a miracle had occurred;-). He says he is “surprised to learn that the autopsy didn’t mention red wine” [and that it was now public knowledge no doubt - oops, I bet he was! No one else mentions red wine either;-)] He describes in much greater detail the (text-book) signs that he had been dead not just “before he reached the hospital” but now “without a doubt, hours rather than minutes” ie reinforcing that it wasn’t his fault, he introduces, but doesn’t name the medical registrar [Dr Siefert] and “one other doctor” [Dr. Bob Brown], then goes on to introduce alibi 5. “We worked on him for half an hour” [ie ‘I tried to save him beyond the call of duty’ - a bizarre thing to claim since he has already told us he had obviously been dead for hours!] rather than the previous “The attempt to resuscitate him was merely a formality.” This “half an hour” scenario obviously came from Monika’s story which he had read in Electric Gypsy, and which had sparked off his whole defensive “red wine” tracheotomy alibi.
He is still keeping this going as he will appeal to be reinstated, his appeal is dismissed, as it will be several times over the years.

[Date?]1995
UK
[B]THE INNER WORLD OF JIMI HENDRIX by Monika Dannemann:(Page) Monika oddly claims “‘Wally’ Price the admissions officer,” said that they worked on Jimi for half an hour. [He said in an interview for Electric Gypsy that he wasn’t worked on at all as he was DOA] She doesn’t claim to have interviewed him, and gives no source for this statement. This appears to be a mix up for Bannister’s ‘half an hour’ claim.
She repeats her claim that Mitch & Stickell’s phoned the Samarkand, both deny they even knew of her prescence, nevermind where she was staying. They both say they phoned Jimi at the Cumberland
She now admits to meeting “three young people” [ie Peter Harvey & co] in a car when they were stuck in traffic. They went to Jimi’s hotel where he phoned then they followed the three to their flat where they stayed for only an hour, before returning to the Samarkand at 20:15 (quarter of an hour earlier than her usual estimate) She saw Jimi writing “I love you” in the car window, in the dust on it. He goes to the party at 01:45, to tell Devon to leave them alone. They get back to the Samarkand at 03:00, She makes him a tuna-fish sandwich at 0:400, he only takes one bite from it [her explanation of why it didn’t show up in the autopsy]. She falls asleep just after 07:00, he is still awake. She wakes at 10:20 goes out for cigs “just a few doors away”, comes back and notices he’s been sick, just a “tiny trickle” from his mouth [no mention of wine]. Tells us againthat she tried to call his doctor, messed around looking for his number, but gave up and phoned Alvinia, and that Judy Wong gave her the number of the Hotel where she had spent the night with Burdon, she spoke with Alvinia who suggested she call an ambulance, she repeats that Burdon told her to wait, and got angry when she said she was calling it anyway. Neither Alvinia or Burdon were there at the flat or the hospital at first. She repeats her accusation that Jimi should have been given a tracheotomy. She phoned Alvinia to get Stickells to come to the hospital. She saw a nurse and a doctor working on Jimi. She was told to sit down and keep quiet. Then Alvinia arrived at the hospital, then Jimi died.

10 September 1995
UK
WINK OF AN EYE BBC Radio Oneinterview with Bannister (no doubt inreply to Monika repeating her tracheotomy allegation) where he states more definitely that “He did not have an obstruction of the airways. What he had was a drowning of the airways. His lungs were completely overcome by liqud” ie not a chance a tracheotomy could have worked, and anyway “he had been dead for hours.” no mention of the half-hour working on him this time. He is still keeping this alibi going as he will again appeal to be reinstated, his appeal is again dismissed, as it will be several times over the years.

[Date?] 1997
UK
JIMI HENDRIX: THE FINAL DAYS by Tony Brown: (Page) “Jimi was transported to the morgue by porter Walter Price.” [He is never mentioned again.]
[Gerry Stickells quoted interview from December 1970 Earth magazine must be a mistake for a 1971 issue, or other, as it’s quite different from the very short comment he makes in this issue.] “In an interview for Earth magazine, published in December 1970, Gerry Stickells stated: "I talked to him just the night before. He was in a great mood. That's why I was so surprised the next day. He was to sign the contracts for his German tour in October the next day. We were also talking about doing four dates in the States around Thanksgiving. He said ‘OK, we'll talk about it more tomorrow when you bring the contracts.' " Tis may be an unpublished part of the interview, shown to Tony? If so he doesn't say. All he actually says is: “It was a rest period,” said road manager and friend Gerry Stickells. “Jimi was just enjoying himself.”
Monika interview by Tony?: “I cooked Jimi a meal at 11pm offish fingers and chips[originally it was spaghetti]and drank a bottle of wine. [According to Harvey they had left his flat ~ 20mins earlier. They would be enroute, or had arrived at Cameron’s at this point according to those at his party]. This wine he had bought earlier. He bought a white and a red bottle. The red bottle I still got....” “he tasted a little of the red, but changed to the white.” [ie both bottles were opened]
“Around 11:00am Iwalked to the shops in Portobello Road [not exactly “across” the road as in her earlier statement] to buy cigarettes.” This statement uniquely puts the time she noticed Jimi had been sick to right at the time she phoned the ambulance, she must have left before 11:00, or either she ran there & back;-)
Interesting how the testimony of Walter Price has disappeared from the story?
Jimi Hendrix: Electric Gypsy (1990) :
“Walter Price (Accident and Emergency [ie ‘Casualty’] admissions officer [porter])... ‘The ambulance turned into the hospital, the two ambulancemen [ie Jones & Saua] jumped out and rushed into Casualty. Two doctors [ie Brown & Bannister] went out there, tried to revive him but couldn't. I heard them say later that he had died in the ambulance. They took him straight down to the mortuary. He never left the ambulance. That's definite.’ [no mention of wine]Later interview – “ I took him to the mortuary.” ” [I][His statement doesn’t fit with anyone’s agenda, he hasn’t anything to hide from, and it certainly fits with the reality - Unknown male, obviously dead for quite some time, obviously from inhaling vomit after an overdose, no point wasting time in a bizarre sham, take his (obviously dead) body to the morgue)
“As the admissions officer, Mr Price would have made out a patient's admission card if Jimi had been brought into the hospital. No such card was made out because officially Jimi was never admitted to the hospital. In his jargon he was DOA - Dead On Arrival.”
According to Tony Brown in The Final Days the only document available from the hospital is the Admissions Book in which the only details entered are Jimi’s name, age, time and date of admittance. There is no reproduction or photo of this admittance book entry, just Tony’s description of this content, he doesn’t say where he got this strictly confidential info from.]

Dr. Seifert’s original statement is “inbetween”: "Jimi was rushed in the re-suss room. He was put on the monitor but it was flat. I pounded his heart a couple of times, but there was no point in doing anything else, as he was dead. I vaguely remember the clothes being flamboyant, but not too well because that isn’t what you concentrate on, and there was a good bit of mess. [no mention of wine]
We didn’t work on him anything like an hour, just a few minutes, he was dead.”
Dr. Bob Brown: It wasn’t as if there was something to be done about it, there simply wasn’t any medical remedy. I went off to attend to another man who’d fallen or jumped in front of a train who was still alive, and left Jimi Hendrix, he was looked after by other people, and [he was] gone . [no mention of wine]
[Ex-Dr] Bannister (struck off for fraud) [I]in his 1992 letter to Harry Shapiro—written while he was being investigated/suspended pending his tribunal for fraud and medical malpractice, in an obvious attempt to quell Monika’s accusation that Hendrix was treated negligently at the hospital, at this particulary awkward time for him): “On his admission he was obviously dead..”. “...the attempt to resuscitate him was merely a formality...”. “I do not believe that he was admitted into hospital and that he was taken to the morgue directly from Casualty (ie Accident & Emergency). “He then goes on to describe himself & others, bizarrely attempting to resuscitate an obviously long dead corpse for half an hour! He portrays the man as having virtually drowned in red wine, his hair and a cloth item around his neck soaked in it, and there being a large amount in his lungs and stomach, ie it was really impossible to save him, as there was too much, ie he wasn’t treated badly we [ie I] went beyond the call of duty, ie he’s covering himself four times over:1.He was dead before he got to the hospital, 2. He was unsaveable anyway due to the amount of wine, 3. We [ie I] tried more than could reasonably be expected, 4. It was his own fault he was a drunk—that’s what you get for drinking too much. He later says Jimi was very tall, hanging over the table by 10 inches— Jimi was only 5’ 11”] He never gave any hint that he thought there was anything suspicious, ie that anyone else was responsible for his death.
Monika:

[Date?]1998
UK
GYPSY EYES: (Page 175)
Kathy: “In 1981...Noel, Mitch and I sat open-mouthed as... she told us how... she gave him some of her German sleeping pills (Vesparax). When they didn’t work she gave him more because ‘they were very weak’*. She said she thought he had taken about nine of the tablets in all.”
*[Odd that Noel & Mitch never mention this in their autobios?]
(Page 180)
Reg Jones: 'When we got to the flat the door was wide open. The body was on the bed, covered in vomit of all colours, black, brown; all over him, all over the pillow. There wasn't another soul in sight. I went back to the ambulance for an aspirator. We tried to revive him but we couldn't. The vomit was all dried, like he'd been lying there a long time. There was no heartbeat. He was blue, not breathing and not responding to light [pupils] or pain. We called the police from the radio in the ambulance, thinking he was dead and that the circumstances were strange. A couple of young policemen turned up and they told us to take him to the hospital.'
Kathy: 'Is that the normal procedure?' I asked.
Reg Jones: 'No. Strictly speaking they shouldn't have done that but they didn't want to have to spend the whole afternoon filling in forms. We helped them out by taking the deceased to the casualty department. None of us realized it was Jimi Hendrix until we read it in the newspapers later that day.'
Kathy: What the policemen should have done if they found a dead body was call in the CID, but as far as they were concerned this was just another dead junkie in Notting Hill. [Had Jimi been in the Cumberland Hotel where everyone knew who he was, it would have been a different story.] This last line is almost verbatim an observation made in Tony Brown’s earlier book, of course it may have been Kathy’s observaton there but he doesn’t credit anyone with it, so we are to assume it was his observation. And of course it would certainly have been treated differently. Monika waking up in a fancy hotel with a dead Jimi, the staff would certainly have been curious, especially with several strange people arriving in the morning, followed by an ambulance, nevermind the mess. Likely much earlier press involvement etc. Doesn’t follow, of course, that the police and ambulance men would have neccessarily done anything different, ie decided the circumstances didn’t warrant involving the CID, that he was dead, had choked on his vomit and taken him to the casualty/morgue]
(Page 181)
Kathy: Dee [Mitchell - Mitch’s wife] rang him [John Saua - the other ambulance man], with me listening in on the extension, and asked him all the same questions we had asked Reg. His answers were exactly the same. He corroborated his partner's story com­pletely. At the end of the conversation.
Dee said: 'Don't you remember the blonde girl who was there? She had long, silver-blonde hair and a German accent.' There was an extended silence and then he
[John Saua] said, 'Doesn't ring any bells. I don't remember there being anyone there.'
We were now sure that Monika's version of the story had been adapted to suit her needs.
Kathy: His [ex-policeman Ian Smith] story fitted exactly with the other two:
Ian Smith: “[Jimi was dead when I got to the hotel. I think I was with another policeman (ie PC Tom Keene - untraced)]”
Kathy: Dr. Rufus Crompton, Director of Forensic Medicine at St. George’s Medical School hsd worked with Professor Teare. We gave him a copy of the autopsy report and asked how, in his opinion, Jimi had died.
Dr. Crompton [no mention of wine]: “He would [quite likely, if not discovered before death. see links] have died from the amount of sleeping pills he had taken anyway. The fact that he vomited and inhaled the vomit just hastened it. The reading in his liver was so high [non of the available free literature I’ve found explains it’s relationship/comparison with the blood level and what it means]
he couldn't have survived it. He couldn't have been breathing by the time he reached the hospital because his lungs were full of fluid, half a pint in one of them. What makes you think he took nine of these tablets?'
Kathy: 'The girl who was with him said that's what happened,' we explained.
Dr. Crompton: 'Well,'
Kathy: ...the doctor looked doubtful...
Dr. Crompton: 'I would say you wouldn't need more than about five of those tablets to get this reading but I'll ask a toxicologist what the dose could have been.' [ie his expertise doesn’t extend to barbiturates, not used as a prescription drug in the UK for approx 20 years]
Dee: “The toxicologist said [ie Kathy accepts this, word of mouth, second hand from a woman she mistrusted, who she says is a proven liar] that it was impossible to say[exactly!]. It could have been as few as four [not that unlikey] tablets or [U]as many as nine.” [If not more, according to [B]specialist studies done on Vesparax in the 1980’s- see links]
Suddenly the picture had changed again [not really]. Instead of the image of the irresponsible rock star knocking back handfuls of pills, [wild exaggeration, no paper said this, nine is not a “handful”] which the media had been happy to run with and build on, it seemed that he might [a very big “might”] have taken just a few. Monika had said that the tablets were very weak [(allegedly) in only one very late interview (no record) with Kathy at which she says Noel & Mitch were present, although strangely neither mentioned this in their bios’?]. If this was [a big “if”] what she told Jimi he could have taken four or five [or nine? or more?]just to get to sleep.
I phoned Eric to ask him more, recording the conversation so that I could play it back to Dee.
'Well,' I said, 'what happened that morning, Eric? Where was Jimi when you got there?'
'I think I saw Jimi on the bed,' he admitted, 'but I couldn't look because of the mess.' He told me that he and Terry the Pill, his road manager, tried to clean the flat up so that when the ambulance arrived they wouldn't find any incriminating evi­dence. At some later stage Gerry Stickells went down there as well. The more we found out, the more Jimi's death looked like a black farce with all these people rushing around trying to cover up for a man who was almost certainly dead.

[Date?] 2000
USA
THE COVERT WAR AGAINST ROCK by Alex Constantine. (Chapter seven)
I Don't Live Today: The Jimi Hendrix Political Harassment, Kidnap and Murder Experience
Takes the earlier occasional unfounded comments that Hendrix may have been murdered by the FBI, or by the Mafia or Jeffery and runs with it combining them all into a FBI/Mafia/Jeffery/Monika plot. Of which there is no evidence apart from TAKING BANNISTER’S DODGY TRACHEOTOMY ALIBI OF HENDRIX BEING “FULL” OF RED WINE AND USING THAT AS THE BASIS TO CONSTRUCT THIS PARANOID FANTASY. His information is frequently innaccurate or garbled to fit, unverifiable speculation, taken from unreliable sources unquestioningly, and sometimes demonstrably false. See that thread for “debate”
[Date?] [B]2001
UK
DON’T LET ME BE MISUNDERSTOOD by Eric Burdon
Says he answered the phone this time, other details same though, says he took a cab there, again states that he arrived just as the ambulance was leaving, but before the police, doesn’t mention Slater being there, says Gerry arrived a bit later. Previously a supporter of Monika, in hindsight, after reading Tony’s book and discussing it with friends he has come to the conclusion that Monika was a stalker and may have spiked Jimi with an OD of crushed up barbs to keep him from leaving, but accidentally killed him. He mentions Kathy phoning him “Listen, a High Court judge is going to reopen Jimi’s case” [says she “rambled on” and finished with] “You just better get your story straight, because we’re going to go through this with a fine tooth comb, and if you haven’t got all the answers to all the questions, you could be looking at doing time.” He makes no comment, and he doesn’t seem concerned.

[Date?] 2005
USA
THE MAN, THE MAGIC, THE TRUTH by Sharon Lawrence
Appears to think Monika killed him accidentally by pouring wine down his neck trying to stop him choking!? A bizarre conclusion.

[Date?] 2009
UK
ROCK ROADIE by James "Tappy" Wright
The Hendrix bits are mainly stories originally told by Eric Burdon in his 1986 book "I Used To Be An Animal...etc" ie 24 years later the stories involve Tappy rather than Burdon;-), but told in an annoying first person Mills and Boone style like Lawrence, as if he can remember extended 40 year old conversations verbatim. The main selling point appears to be the claim that two and a half years later in February 1973, shortly before he died, Jeffery confessed to him that "...we [...] got a handful of pills and stuffed them into his mouth... then we poured a few bottles of red wine deep into his windpipe." [THANK YOU ALEX CONSTANTINE! oh, and of course Bannister;-)] He also suggests Jeffery murdered Devon in revenge for introducing Jimi to Alan Douglas. Repeats Douglas' unfounded posthumous gossip that Hendrix cuckolded Jeffery with his girlfriend Lyn Bailey. And introduces the unfounded (again posthumous) gossip that Hendrix also cuckolded Chandler with his wife.
It has already been discussed amply above to show what patent nonsense this alleged "confession" is.
2009: The disgraced Bannister now says that he thinks “murder by wine” was “a possibility”. It of course nicely backs up his “drowned in red wine” tracheotomy alibi;-) from where Tappy’s “memory” obviously comes from. This is the sole source, he is the only person to mention seeing any wine at the death scene, neither the police, the ambulance men, the other two doctors, the admissions porter, the witnesses: Dannemann, Alvinia, Burdon, Slater, Stickells, Barrett, the pathologist, the coroner, or anyone else mention wine of any kind - never mind masses of red wine covering him, his hair and clothes, filling his lungs and stomach, and running out his mouth;-). It’s not inconcievable that this statement could also be part of the promo for the book;-)
2009: Dr. Bob Brown (the third doctor) eventually spoke on the matter to say he though the accusation that it was murder "was a long stretch" (ie not credible), and that he had seen that Hendrix was obviously dead, and went off to treat somene else, leaving him in the care of others (ie Bannister, Siefert, nurses etc.). See Bannister’s original comment “merely a formality”, Dr. Siefert “We only worked on him for a few minutes, he was dead.” and Walter Price.


[Date?] 2010
USA
BECOMING JIMI HENDRIX by Brad Schrieber (and Steve Roby )
Brad Schrieber is the latest to jump on the James "Tappy" Wright "confession" bandwagon, thereby losing his credibility and exposing himself as being extremely gullible. Either that or just another cynically percieved selling point? Roby made it clear in the radio ppromotion that he disagreed with Schrieber over this, but this is not made clear in the book. Did Schrieber pull a fast one on Roby, sneaking this in?

Unfinished, any missing info/corrections welcome

[Daty?} Early 2011
Italy
UNIVIBES Caesar & co promise to reveal that Jimi wasn't dead hours before he arrived at the hopital. Did he expire on the way? how does this tie in with the "autopsy" rice? Should be interesting.

cartman
11-10-10, 07:08 AM
stp... you da man. definitive. respect.

purple jim
11-14-10, 03:20 AM
I'll say. Great work STP.

BURTCOBAIN
11-14-10, 08:19 AM
bloody heckers like . .thats a lot ov info there . .
thanks for collating it all . .

Fenders Fingers
11-14-10, 09:54 AM
bloody heckers like . .thats a lot ov info there . .
thanks for collating it all . .

It's all made up. Ain't no STPLSD just a room full of monkeys and keyboards woot1

Cheers mate.

Fenders Fingers
11-14-10, 10:30 AM
Hey STPLSD, you should write a book :-)

jhendrixfanatic
11-14-10, 11:03 AM
The light of truth does finally shine. As for one mired for decades in "researched misconception", your posts are a revelation. Heartfelt thanks,STP!

stplsd
11-16-10, 01:47 AM
It's all made up. Ain't no STPLSD just a room full of monkeys and keyboards woot1

Cheers mate.

It has been worked out that if you put enough monkeys in a room long enough, with some typewriters they'll produce Shakespeare's works. .... and they will eventually come up with the James bible!;-) I could only afford few monkeys and a duff typewriter, but lt sounds quite convincing?

stplsd
11-21-10, 06:16 PM
Thanks to vibratory for alerting me to Univbes news that they promise to print the skinny on Jmi's demise in the new year. Definitely a 'must'.

http://www.univibes.com/News.html

Fenders Fingers
11-22-10, 07:39 AM
It has been worked out that if you put enough monkeys in a room long enough, with some typewriters they'll produce Shakespeare's works. .... and they will eventually come up with the James bible!;-) I could only afford few monkeys and a duff typewriter, but lt sounds quite convincing?

Yeah, but that was a blinder of an idea to get the monkey's pissed first ;-)

stplsd
11-22-10, 04:11 PM
Ha-ha-ha. The monkey's got pissed enough to get into typing Shakespeare, but by the time they had got halfway through the bible the Archbishop realised what they were up to and ordered a dammned good thrashing [& possibly a bit of buggery] and soon had all that nonsense sorted out. Thanks to his prompt(ish) actions the world was safe again

Fenders Fingers
11-23-10, 09:09 AM
Ha-ha-ha. The monkey's got pissed enough to get into typing Shakespeare, but by the time they had got halfway through the bible the Archbishop realised what they were up to and ordered a dammned good thrashing [& possibly a bit of buggery] and soon had all that nonsense sorted out. Thanks to his prompt(ish) actions the world was safe again

So the (bashing) Bishop spanked the monkey, that what your tellin' me ?

hooters1

BobJahBob
11-23-10, 10:16 PM
Dr Bob Brown is actually the leader of the Australian Green Party now, here's a short radio interview with Bob regarding Jimi's death:
http://greensmps.org.au/content/greencast/bob-talks-about-jimi-hendrixs-death

stplsd
11-28-10, 12:29 AM
So the (bashing) Bishop spanked the monkey, that what your tellin' me ?

hooters1

Just can't the little f'ker off my back sometimes;-)

Vibratory
11-28-10, 06:56 AM
Why is this thread about monkeys? You guys r perverted.
lol

purpleplexi
03-15-11, 01:14 PM
Don't I remember (here I go again) an interview with Eric saying that they took some drugs of some sort from the room and buried them in the garden of the Samarkand and Eric saying that when the ambulance arrived he and/or Monika were hiding behind the hedge?

stplsd
05-15-11, 06:56 AM
Addition to clarify:

OCTOBER 1990
US
ELECTRIC GYPSY is published, it contains Monika's accusation that the Doctor in charge (unamed) was grossly negligent in not perfoming a tracheotomy, as to by-pass what was choking him.

16 SEPTEMBER 1991
Australia
Bannister’s Medical Tribunal opened the hearings into complaints of several acts of medical malpractise and fraud against him

13 MARCH 1992
Australia
By this date Bannister’s Medical Tribunal had heard all the complaints.

[Day?] JANUARY 1992
Australia
Bannister wrote to Shapiro (see above comments), admitting he was the Dr. in charge, and concocting his "masses of red wine" alibi for not performing a tracheotomy.
He obviously hadn’t been in contact with other witnesses

28 APRIL 1992
Australia
John Bannister is reprimanded for 2 counts of medical malpracice and struck off the medical register for fraud

2000
USA
In THE COVERT WAR AGAINST ROCK Alex Constantine uses Bannisters "red wine" albi as the foundation of a ludicrous combined FBI/Mafia/Mike Jeffery/Monika/whoever else he can think of etc. "Waterboarding to death" with red wine plot ('lost the plot' more like;-), for which there is not a shred of evidence.

2009
USA
Tappy Wright jumps on Constantine's conspiracy bandwagon with his farcical "confession" claim

http://www.google.co.uk/#hl=en&xhr=t...b9aa294c8c9b68 (http://www.google.co.uk/#hl=en&xhr=t&q=dr+john+bannister&cp=2&pq=john%20bannister&pf=p&sclient=psy&rlz=1R2ADFA_enGB430&source=hp&aq=0sx&aqi=&aql=&oq=drjohn+bannister&pbx=1&fp=a9b9aa294c8c9b68)