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View Full Version : Jimi Hendrix - In Memoriam (18/IX/1970 - 18/IX/2008)



Emilovious
09-18-08, 07:44 AM
http://img295.imageshack.us/img295/3932/ww1tl7.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 07:55 AM
http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/4381/image16bbbal4.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 07:58 AM
http://img391.imageshack.us/img391/8692/ww2fk9.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Olvator
09-18-08, 08:01 AM
forever in our hearts....
http://www.olve-strelow.de/esc/weidling14.gif

Emilovious
09-18-08, 08:03 AM
http://img519.imageshack.us/img519/644/ww3nw2.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 08:05 AM
http://img234.imageshack.us/img234/7107/1748xr0.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 08:08 AM
http://img178.imageshack.us/img178/2199/1729uc0.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Olvator
09-18-08, 08:11 AM
wait a moment now, emil! where is that pic from??? I thought I was the Fehmarn specialist here, haha. never seen it. You have more from that series?

Olvator
09-18-08, 08:15 AM
ahhh, i see now... i just had a cropped version of it, probably from brumepourpre´s site. but still, i would like to know who took these shots from that perspective, maybe there are more?

here is one of my favourite pics from his last show (or to be exact, shortly before his last show.....)
http://www.olve-strelow.de/esc/backstage.JPG

Emilovious
09-18-08, 08:20 AM
http://img246.imageshack.us/img246/6884/1757ky1.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 08:24 AM
http://img84.imageshack.us/img84/5959/ww4fu5.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 08:27 AM
http://img513.imageshack.us/img513/1113/ww5yi2.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 08:31 AM
http://img373.imageshack.us/img373/3966/ww7il8.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 08:32 AM
http://img183.imageshack.us/img183/6030/ww8yc9.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 08:33 AM
http://img360.imageshack.us/img360/5498/ww6jp4.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 08:42 AM
Dear Olve, I don't know who took that pic. These was many photographers there (as you know better than I do) that took those with Jimi going towards and climbing to the stage. Where did I find it and who took it - I don't know. The only certain thing is that nobody sent it to me and I found it somewhere on the net.
I'll see if I have more that might be part of the same series.
Maybe this one (but I doubt it):

http://img172.imageshack.us/img172/8181/ww9ny2.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 08:56 AM
Bob Dylan about Jimi:
The first time I saw him, he was playing with John Hammond (Jr.). He was incredible then. I'd already been to England and beyond, and although he didn't sing, I kinda had a feeling he figured into things… I liked Jimi Hendrix's record of this and ever since he died I've been doing it that way. Funny though, his way of doing it and my way of doing it weren't that dissimilar, I mean the meaning of the song doesn't change like when some artists do other artists' songs. Strange though how when I sing it I always feel like it's a tribute to him in some kind of way.
- Bob Dylan, from the liner notes to the Biograph CD box set, © 1985 CBS Inc.

It's always nice when another performer takes one of your songs & does it. Usually someone has his own point of view on things & the lyrics correspond to what he's thinking in some kind of way & the two meet up. My songs were not written with the idea in mind that anyone else would sing them, they were written for me to play live & that is the sort of end of it. I knew jimi slightly before he became a big star, never saw him much after that. Naturally there was a strong connection because we came from the same time, similar environments & had more or less the same likes & dislikes, attitudes & experiences. When i first heard Jimi, he was basically a blues player but unlike everybody else outside of the old-authentic guys, he was young & he was the real thing. Getting back to the songwriting part, it can't be expected that a performer get under the song, inside & blow it out. It's like getting inside of another person's soul. Most people have enough trouble getting inside of their own souls & to take on another one, really most of the time can't be worth the ride. Of course there are different degrees, like for instance, there's not too much to getting into a Chuck Berry song. It's all pretty much there on the surface. you just kind of learn the riffs, mouth the words & they sing themselves, you don't have to go far. Anybody with half an ear can do it. Same thing with the Beatles. You learn the chords and sing the words & youre a Beatle. There's no pain involved here. You're just doing songs that fly along, don't step on anybody's toes & having a good time doing it. My songs are different & I don't expect others to make attempts to sing them because you have to get somewhat inside & behind them & it's hard enough for me to do it sometimes & then obviously you have to be in the right frame of mind. But even then there would be a vague value to it because nobody breathes like me so they couldn't be expected to portray the meaning of a certain phrase in the correct way without bumping into other phrases & altering the mood, changing the understanding & just giving up so that they then become only verses strung together for no apparent reason, patter for a performer to kill time, take up space, giving a heartless rendition of what was it to begin with. Jimi knew my songs were not like that. He sang them exactly the way they were intended to be sung & he played them the same way. He played them the way I would have done them if I was him. Never thought too much about it at the time but now that years have gone by, I see that the message must have been his message thru & thru, not that i could ever articulate the message that well myself, but in hearing Jimi cover it, I realize he must've felt it pretty deeply inside & out & that somewhere back there his soul & my soul were on the same desert. I can't speak as a musician but as a songwriter. It's always a humbling feeling to know that other musicians like your stuff especially if you really respect them. Audiences & critics give important feedback but there's nothing like another performer doing what you're doing, to let you know if you're doing it well or not, if youre cutting thru, that maybe it really is worth all the time & trouble. In all my years of being on stage, it still means more to me what other musicians & singers think & feel about my work than anybody else. Jimi was a great artist, I wished he would've lived but he got sucked under & that's been the downfall of a lot of us. I feel he had his time & his place & he paid a price he didn't have to pay. It's not a wonder to me that he recorded my songs but rather that he recorded so few of them because they were all his.
- Bob Dylan (written about Hendrix for a Hendrix exhibit)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 08:58 AM
http://img183.imageshack.us/img183/599/ww10bu0.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Olvator
09-18-08, 08:58 AM
thanks emil! did not have it in that resolution i think....

here we go with a couple of others...

http://www.olve-strelow.de/esc/70-09-05-01.jpg

http://www.olve-strelow.de/esc/70-09-05-02.jpg

http://www.olve-strelow.de/esc/70-09-05-03.jpg

http://www.olve-strelow.de/esc/70-09-05-04.jpg

Olvator
09-18-08, 08:59 AM
http://www.olve-strelow.de/esc/70-09-05-05.jpg

http://www.olve-strelow.de/esc/70-09-05-06.jpg

http://www.olve-strelow.de/esc/70-09-05-07.jpg

http://www.olve-strelow.de/esc/70-09-05-08.jpg

Emilovious
09-18-08, 08:59 AM
------------------------------------------------------------

Emilovious
09-18-08, 09:02 AM
Wonderful Olve. Simply beautiful photos (no other word for them).
Thanks!

Olvator
09-18-08, 09:06 AM
Wonderful Olve. Simply beautiful photos (no other word for them).
Thanks!

hey, maybe you have the photos that Monika Danneman took on Sept. 17th in the garden in reasonable resolution???

Freedom
09-18-08, 09:12 AM
Great stuff guys!!!


hey, maybe you have the photos that Monika Danneman took on Sept. 17th in the garden in reasonable resolution???

Give me some time and i'll scan them and post them... ;)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 09:12 AM
Olve, I saved the following story about the autograph driver on Fehmarn got from Jimi. However, I can't remember where I saved the actual scan of the autograph. Do you know which autograph he's talking about?
Here's the story (it's interesting in fact, you might use it for the exhibition maybe?):

Here is one that Jimi gave to Otta Barnasch, who was the driver of the black Mercedes limousine. Otto says, that he drove Jimi from hotel Dania to the festival area twice, once on Saturday evening, and then again on Sunday morning for the actual performance. This was given to him on Saturday afternoon 1970-09-05, just as he met Jimi.
Reports Otto: " I was called to the hotel, as I have a cap business on Fehmarn. Pure coincidence that I got to drive Jimi. I met him in the courtyard of the hotel and he was a very funny and nice guy. He climbed up a flagpole (sorry folks, is that the right term!!!??), he seemed very flexible, didn´t take long and he was up there at the flag, amazing. I liked that, and as he came down again, I asked for the autograph (for my kids). He asked how many kids I had, I said two. So he gave me two. On one of them, he also drew a sun the moon and some stars, but that one seems to be lost."

Emilovious
09-18-08, 09:13 AM
hey, maybe you have the photos that Monika Danneman took on Sept. 17th in the garden in reasonable resolution???

Resonable?
I'll see what I have.
Freedom, if you can scan them directly from her book, that would be GREAT!

Emilovious
09-18-08, 09:16 AM
Joe Satriani about Jimi:

For my soul, Jimi Hendrix was the deepest blues player. He played the
saddest stuff, and he played the funniest. And he played the most
outside stuff, but it was really from the gut. He strayed from
traditional blues playing, yet he always seemed to incorporate the
moans and the cries into a phrasing that was completely blues.
"Red House" is a monument to blues. It's beyond the recording or a
song, because it's a silly song-blues songs are mostly silly or
they're crying-in-your-beer kinds of songs-but at the same time he
makes it heavy. He plays blues throughout the entire song. It's not
like some guy who waits for the solo. The whole piece is an
orchestration of blues from delicate to bombastic. It's unbelievable.
The original recording in the States on Smash Hits-I just love it.
I've worn out many a Hendrix record listening to that song over and
over again. It's one of my favorites to play. Of course, the live
versions were always different. It was like his litmus paper about
how he was feeling about blues all the time. He was really good at
just being open with his arrangements, and that song certainly took a
lot of changes with it-the band would stop and start up again, and
he'd do whatever he wanted to with it.
Whenever I can, I do "Red House" live. The last few times were with
Mick Jagger. We did it a number of times in Australia and New
Zealand, and we used to fool around with it in rehearsals. In fact,
it was the first thing that I played with him onstage, at the Bottom
Line [in New York] earlier in 1988. I like to do it almost verbatim.
It's just a thrill for me to try to even come close to the vibe that
Hendrix gave off with the whole thing, the sounds and every-thing.
I've listened to Jimi Hendrix records constantly ever since I first
heard them. I've never had a lull of interest or enjoyment when
listening to his stuff. All the songs and all the guitar sounds are
different from song to song. I was listening to Electric Ladyland
again this morning, and it's just one long trip, with a lot of
different stops along the way. It's really unbelievable, all the
things he did with it. This particular record is so uncommon, and no
one today would dare put out a record like that. Everyone puts out an
album filled with 10 songs that are basically the same and that can
be supported by video, a tour with props, and the whole thing.
This comes from a different age, where every song was an event in
itself and an album was something you actually listened to-side one,
then you flipped it over. It's got a very unique pacing. You can sit
there and listen to it, and it doesn't hit you over the head
with "I'm the hit single, I'm the second hit single, I'm the third
hit single." It was ahead of its time, and the production values were
very much like the Beatles' Revolver album, in the fact that they
were really reaching. There's an enthusiasm in the discoveries in the
studio. That's what I really like about it. All the whistles and
noises that they did with tape speed and stuff don't sound like a
Roland D-50 or a Yamaha DX7 or a Fairlight. It sounds kind of funky
and unpredictable-it's analog, and it's complex in its lack of
fidelity. The inefficiency of it, let's say, still appeals to me. I
find it very interesting. It's somehow more interesting for the brain
to experience it a thousand times.

Freedom
09-18-08, 09:22 AM
Resonable?
Freedom, if you can scan them directly from her book, that would be GREAT!

I am doing it right now... ;)

Gimme 10 minutes or so...

Olvator
09-18-08, 09:22 AM
Olve, I saved the following story about the autograph driver on Fehmarn got from Jimi. However, I can't remember where I saved the actual scan of the autograph. Do you know which autograph he's talking about?
Here's the story (it's interesting in fact, you might use it for the exhibition maybe?):

Here is one that Jimi gave to Otta Barnasch, who was the driver of the black Mercedes limousine. Otto says, that he drove Jimi from hotel Dania to the festival area twice, once on Saturday evening, and then again on Sunday morning for the actual performance. This was given to him on Saturday afternoon 1970-09-05, just as he met Jimi.
Reports Otto: " I was called to the hotel, as I have a cap business on Fehmarn. Pure coincidence that I got to drive Jimi. I met him in the courtyard of the hotel and he was a very funny and nice guy. He climbed up a flagpole (sorry folks, is that the right term!!!??), he seemed very flexible, didn´t take long and he was up there at the flag, amazing. I liked that, and as he came down again, I asked for the autograph (for my kids). He asked how many kids I had, I said two. So he gave me two. On one of them, he also drew a sun the moon and some stars, but that one seems to be lost."

that story comes from me probably. it is like that on my Fehmarn site, and I translated it to english:-))

here it is:

http://www.olve-strelow.de/fehmarn/daythree/jimimercedesautograph.jpg

and another one I really like....

http://www.olve-strelow.de/esc/fehmarn2.jpg

Emilovious
09-18-08, 09:35 AM
From Guitar Player Magazine (pt.1)

September 1975

Mike Bloomfield about Jimi

THE FIRST TIME I SAW Jimi play he was Jimmy
James with the Blue Flames. I was performing with
Paul Butterfield, and I was the hot shot guitarist on
the block - I thought I was it. I'd never heard of
Hendrix. Then someone said, "You got to see the
guitar player with John Hammond." I was at the
Cafe Au Go Go and he was at the Nite Owl or the
Cafe Wha? I went right across the street and saw
him. Hendrix knew who I was, and that day, in front
of my eyes, he burned me to death. I didn't even
get my guitar out. H bombs were going off, guided
missiles were flying - I can't tell you the sounds he
was getting out of his instrument. He was getting
every sound I was ever to hear him get right there
in that room with a Stratocaster, a Twin (amplifier),
a Maestro fuzz, and that was all - he was doing it
mainly through extreme volume. How he did this,
I wish I understood. He just got right up in my face
with that axe, and I didn't even want to pick up a
guitar for the next year.

I was awed. I'd never heard anything like it. I
didn't even know where he was coming from musically,
because he wasn't playing any of his own tunes. He was
doing things like "Like A Rolling Stone," but in the
most unusual way. He wasn't a singer; he wasn't even
particularly a player. That day, Jimi Hendrix was
laying things on me that were more sounds than they
were licks. But I found, after hearing him two orthree
more times, that he was into pure melodic playing and
lyricism as much as he was into sounds. In fact, he
had melded them into a perfect blend.

Jimi told me he'd been playing the chit-lin' circuit,
and he hadn't heard guitarists doing anything new.
He was bored out of his mind. He was a real shy
talker, and often spoke in riddles, though he could
be quite lucid if pinned down. He explained that he
could do more than play backup guitar in the chitlin'
circuit. And though he was a rotten singer, he knew
that he had alot going on electric guitar. Jimi said he
had never heard anyone play in his style.

We both performed around Greenwich Village for
months, but I didn't know that Hendrix wrote his own
music, and he never sang. He would mumble a song.
Right around the time he was playing with John
Hammond, Chas Chandler got hold of him and said,
"You'll sing how you sing. Don't worry about it, man;
you've got enough going for you."

There was no great electric guitarist in rock and roll
that Jimi didn't know of. I could ask him about records
that I knew had real fancy guitar parts, where the
performer was ahead of his time or playing funky on
a record that wasn't particularly funky. For example,
Jimi knew all about avery early Righteous Brothers
record on which there's a guitarist who plays very
advanced rock and roll guitar for that time. There's
another record by Robert Parker, who made "Barefootin""
called, "You Better Watch Yourself," that has a real hot
guitar player with a style more like Hendrix than most
session players. Jimi said it wasn't him, but that he
knew the guy -somebody named Big Tom Collins. He knew
every hot guitarist on record.

When Are You Experienced came out, it was fantastic.
But I was even more impressed with Jimi's second LP,
Axis: Bold As Love. It was fabulous, utterly funky.
I'd heard the Who and Cream and much loud electric
power music, but I had never heard a trio that really
worked and was so danceable. Hendrix defined how a
trio should sound. He had such an orchestral concept
that Are You Experienced negated everything I had
heard in the English lead guitar power trio field.

Jimi had been fooling with feedback, but when he
heard the Yardbirds, he realized its huge potential.
Hendrix would sustain a note and add vibrato so that
it sounded just like a human voice. He used an
immense vocabulary of controlled sounds, not just
hoping to get those sounds, but actually controlling
them as soon as he produced them. I have never heard
such controlled frenzy, especially in electric
music. Jimi said that he went to England to wipe
them out, and he did.

When he came back to the U.S., he jammed a lot.
He was in the habit, around 1968 or '69, of carrying
two very good home recorders with him, and every
time he jammed he would set these up so that, with
the two four-track machines, he was getting eight
tracks of recording. God knows who has these tapes,
but Jimi was a massive chronicler of his own and
other people's jams. I personally saw at least ten
jams that he recorded. The Cafe Au Go Go in New York
also had extremely good recording facilities, and I
believe they recorded every time Hendrix jammed
there; he did that countless times.

I don't think Jimi used anything but Stratocasters
very much. If he used another guitar, that was probably
because his wasn't around, or he just wanted to see
what another was like, or - as in the caseof the
Flying V in the Hendrix documentary film - he was at
a point where he didn't care about anything. I think
the Flying V was something they stuck in his hands.
He played real sloppy, and that was the only bad
playing I ever recall seeing or hearing by Hendrix.

I never saw anything customized on any of his guitars,
except he told me that his wang bar was customized
on all of his guitars, so he could pull it back much
farther than a whole step. He wanted to be able to
lower it three steps. He had no favorite guitar;
they were all expendable. Buddy Miles has some of
his Strats, and all the ones that I've tried are hard
to play -heavy strings and heavy action. I'm amazed
that he could play as facile as he did.

Jimi's musical approach, as he explained it to me,
was to lay out the entire song and decide how it
should be - horns, strings, the way it would wind up.
He would play the drum beat on a damp wah-wah pedal,
the bass part on the bass strings of his guitar,
and the pattern of the song with just the wah-wah
pedal. Then he would flesh the pattern out by playing
it with chords and syncopation. He was extremely
interested in form. In a few seconds of playing, he'd
let you know about the entire structure. That's why he
liked rhythm guitar playing so much; The rhythm guitar
could lay out the structure for the whole song. He
would always say,"This is a world of lead guitar players,
but the most essential thing to learn is the time, the
rhythm." He once told me he wanted to burn Clapton to
death because he didn't play rhythm.

Jimi would play a bass pattern, and then fill it in
with chords. And at the exact same time he would play
lead by making a high note ring out while using very
unorthodox chord positions. He had a massive thumb,
which he used like an additional finger, so his hand
positions were unconventional for every chord.

Once we played a gig at The Shrine inLos Angeles,
and we were backstage fooling around with our guitars.
Hendrix was playing with his toggle switch. He was
taking the toggle switch of the guitar, tapping the
back of the neck, and using vibrato,and it came out
sounding like a sirocco, a wind coming up from the
desert. I have never heard a sound on a Hendrix record
that I have not seen him create in front of my eyes.




http://img229.imageshack.us/img229/8769/ww11ux8.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Olvator
09-18-08, 09:36 AM
http://www.olve-strelow.de/esc/70-09-06-76.jpg

http://www.olve-strelow.de/esc/70-09-06-77.jpg

Steev
09-18-08, 09:42 AM
Thanx 4 this guys. If I could get photobucket to work (not likely) I'd love to put something up myself.
Maybe I'll try again. It would be a good day. . . . .
FOREVER in our hearts.

Emilovious
09-18-08, 09:48 AM
From Guitar Player Magazine (pt.2)

September 1975

Mike Bloomfield about Jimi

I don't know how he kept the guitar in tune. If you
jerk a wang bar, your guitar goes out of tune. But
his didn't, apparently.He could bend it in tune.

Somehow, by tapping the back of his guitar neck
(which he constantly did) and by using the bar,
Jimi could control feed back. You would hear a
rumbling start. He knew which note would feed back
and what harmonic he was shooting for, and then he
controlled it. Somehow, when he had all the notes
open, he would raise the pitch level by using the
bar and he'd get a higher note to feed back, or he
would make the bass note feed back harmonically. He
was listening for such things,and I believe he heard
them on the English records, particularly by the
Yardbirds and Jeff Beck. He was very modest. He never
said he took feedback further than theYardbirds. He
said, "I fool with it, and what I'm doing now is the
fruits of my fooling around."

You couldn't even tell what Hendrix was doing with his
body. He moved with all those tricks that black
guitarists had been using since T-Bone Walker and
Guitar Slim playing behind his head and with his teeth.
He took exhibitionism to a new degree. He used to crash
his guitar agains this hip. It was a bold gesture, and
he would get a roaring, fuzzy, feedback sound. His body
motion was so integrated with his playing that you
couldn't tell where one started and the other left off.

Many of his sounds were things that Jimi stumbled on,
and a lot he shopped for. They became part of his
musical language. It wasn't something he could just
tell you how to do. You had to understand the whole
way he heard sound, the way he wanted to feel sound
and get it out to create music.

I remember going to his hotel room. He had a little
Kay amp against the wall, and he had his guitar out.
Immediately he was getting new sounds out of it.
He never stopped playing. His guitar was the first
thing he'd reach for when he woke up. Wewere bopping
around New York once, and I said, "Let's find some
girls." He said,"That can wait; there's always time
for that. Let's play, man." He was the most compulsive
player I've ever run into. That's why he was so good.

Melodically, he used two basic scales:The blues minor
scale and its relative major. If he was playing A
minor, he would go to C major and make it a major
seventh scale. "All Along The Watchtower" is a perfect
vehicle for minor or blues scale improvisation, while
"Bold As Love," "Little Wing," and "The Wind Cries
Mary' were perfect for major key explorations.

But it was no big thing for Hendrix to play melodies;
he wanted to play like anorchestra. This is the crux
of his music. it's not just lead guitar, it's
orchestral guitar, like Segovia, Chet Atkins, Wilburn
Burchette, Ry Cooder, and George Van Eps. Jimi Hendrix
was the most orchestral of all. Have you ever heard
"The Star Spangled Banner" on Rainbow Bridge?
That's recorded like a huge symphony.

I recall Jimi saying that he wanted to get a band
together that was not like theExperience, one with a
lot of interplay and more equality, with guys he could
learn from as much as they from him. With the Experience,
he played bass half the time on record. He wanted a
trio with percussion and a horn or two, with singers
more voices than his own. If anyone was a one-man band,
it was Jimi. He'd tap his foot and would have a drum;
that's all he needed. Perhaps the burden of being the
whole orchestra was too much.

Hendrix was by far the greatest expert I've ever heard
at playing rhythm and blues, the style of playing
developed by Bobby Womack, Curtis Mayfield, Eric Gale,
and others. I got the feeling there was no guitaring of
any kind that he hadn't heard or studied, including
steel guitar, Hawaiian, and dobro.

In his playing I can really hear Curtis Mayfield, Wes
Montgomery, Albert King, B.B. King, and Muddy Waters.
Jimi was theblackest guitarist I ever heard. His music
was deeply rooted in pre blues, the oldest musical
forms like field hollers and gospel melodies. From what
I can garner, there was no form of black music that he
hadn't listened to or studied, but he especially loved
the real old black music forms, and they poured out in
his playing. We often talked about Son House and the old
blues guys. But what really did it to him was early Muddy
Waters and John Lee Hooker records, that early electric
music where the guitar was hugely amplified and boosted
by the studio to give it the effect of more presence
than it really had. He knew that stuff backwards. You
can hear every old John Lee Hooker and Muddy Waters
thing that ever was on that one long version of "Voodoo
Chile" (ElectricLadyland].

I never heard Jimi play anything that sounds like jazz,
though I have heard him play like Mahavishnu
[John McLaughlin]. He learned to apply melodic
ideas to permanent sustain, tied in with feedback from
the Yardbirds and other English groups. I think he even
mentioned Beck's "Bolero."

Jimi's lyrics and folkadelic clothes were all stone white,
but he's as black as they come. He applied all of his
techniques, which he mostly got from rock and roll and
English groups, to black melody lines and bluesy scales.
There's very little recorded of Hendrix playing blues,
other than the two "Red House" cuts, but he was an
unparalleled blues guitarist. However, I remember him
saying that he found playing blues boring.

Though I watched Hendrix perform many times, I couldn't
understand his hand positions or the chords he used. He
could play left or right-handed with equal facility.
Sometimes, he didn't even re-string his guitar; he just
played it upside down.

I feel that Hendrix was one of the most innovative guitar
players who ever lived. He was the man that took electric
music and defined it. He turned sounds from devices like
wah-wahs into music. They weren't gimmicks when he used
them. In fact, they were beyond music. They were in the
realm of pure sound and music combined. Every time I ever
saw l Jimi play, I felt that he was an object lesson for
everything that I should be and wasn't. But I could never
say something like that to him, because he was a super
modest guy.

I didn't see Jimi for a long while, and when I did, he
had the stink of death on him. He smelled like he was
rotting from the inside out. He had that rock star look
that was fashionable then, the look of starving: no food,
no sleep, very sallow. I couldn't talk to him because it
was so shocking and horrible that I didn't want to
confront that.

One of the traits of barbiturates is that you can taste
them. If a capsule breaks before it gets into your stomach
and lodges in your throat, it acts as an emetic and forces
you to vomit. I'm sure that's what happened: A few capsules
got caught in his throat, forced him to vomit, and he died.
I'm positive he didn't commit suicide. But I'm also positive
that if some one hadn't taken him in hand, he would have
burned out anyway, because when I saw him before he died,
he was a wreck. Too much of being a product was killing him.
Maybe he didn't want to stop, or maybe he didn't know how.
Ultimately, it's in the artists hands.
Obviously Jimi didn't stop.

Steev
09-18-08, 10:08 AM
http://thumb16.webshots.net/t/69/569/7/45/14/2590745140104044756NiEELp_th.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2590745140104044756NiEELp)

Now if I can just size this properly . . .
All from Temple 5/16/70

Steev
09-18-08, 10:10 AM
http://inlinethumb42.webshots.com/41001/2590745140104044756S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2590745140104044756NiEELp)
Yessssssss

Freedom
09-18-08, 10:11 AM
http://www.imageshack.gr/files/f7g4qbrsr69ufcbc534v.jpg (http://www.imageshack.gr/view.php?file=f7g4qbrsr69ufcbc534v.jpg)

Steev
09-18-08, 10:12 AM
http://inlinethumb02.webshots.com/1665/2121679960104044756S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2121679960104044756lIGhNY)

Freedom
09-18-08, 10:12 AM
http://www.imageshack.gr/files/l7qf75nddom0ap6mjra2.jpg (http://www.imageshack.gr/view.php?file=l7qf75nddom0ap6mjra2.jpg)

(sorry guys, for some reason i couldn't scan this one any better)

Steev
09-18-08, 10:13 AM
http://inlinethumb35.webshots.com/9698/2273827630104044756S500x500Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2273827630104044756iqichK)

Freedom
09-18-08, 10:13 AM
http://www.imageshack.gr/files/x23bftqav7yukenqd2mj.jpg (http://www.imageshack.gr/view.php?file=x23bftqav7yukenqd2mj.jpg)

Steev
09-18-08, 10:14 AM
http://inlinethumb17.webshots.com/41808/2524819110104044756S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2524819110104044756YSyOXh)

Freedom
09-18-08, 10:14 AM
http://www.imageshack.gr/files/scjfbm13brbvvm8yl2mf.jpg (http://www.imageshack.gr/view.php?file=scjfbm13brbvvm8yl2mf.jpg)

Steev
09-18-08, 10:15 AM
http://inlinethumb36.webshots.com/43107/2651957270104044756S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2651957270104044756RCmdBJ)

Steev
09-18-08, 10:16 AM
http://inlinethumb50.webshots.com/43569/2891448080104044756S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2891448080104044756xENcTv)

Steev
09-18-08, 10:17 AM
http://inlinethumb34.webshots.com/14945/2131657490104044756S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2131657490104044756yFAdEz)

Steev
09-18-08, 10:18 AM
http://inlinethumb59.webshots.com/42042/2304966440104044756S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2304966440104044756kJDPKB)
Just ask the Axis: HE KNOWS EVERYTHING

Emilovious
09-18-08, 10:20 AM
http://img376.imageshack.us/img376/6509/ww12uz8.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 10:22 AM
http://img398.imageshack.us/img398/5229/ww13ct0.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 10:25 AM
Nice scan, Freedom. Thanks.

Steev, does these posts of your mean you finally got Photobucket to work?
Thanks anyway, my friend.

Freedom
09-18-08, 10:25 AM
http://www.imageshack.gr/files/n4x7ck0rim1fc170fg83.jpg (http://www.imageshack.gr/view.php?file=n4x7ck0rim1fc170fg83.jpg)

Freedom
09-18-08, 10:26 AM
http://www.imageshack.gr/files/arc377hns2djjh6nbryf.jpg (http://www.imageshack.gr/view.php?file=arc377hns2djjh6nbryf.jpg)

Freedom
09-18-08, 10:27 AM
Nice scan, Freedom. Thanks.

Pleasure is all mine my friend... ;)

http://www.imageshack.gr/files/iskcm8mi58l9qlgwprdw.jpg (http://www.imageshack.gr/view.php?file=iskcm8mi58l9qlgwprdw.jpg)

Steev
09-18-08, 10:27 AM
http://inlinethumb35.webshots.com/42722/2738178580104044756S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2738178580104044756rItGhC)

But You Woke Up And You Smiled My Name - And You Stole My Heart Away

Freedom
09-18-08, 10:27 AM
http://www.imageshack.gr/files/9vbwsiw00zbah3f6sh3e.jpg (http://www.imageshack.gr/view.php?file=9vbwsiw00zbah3f6sh3e.jpg)

Freedom
09-18-08, 10:28 AM
http://www.imageshack.gr/files/qmf5byabu9vayvlt1k07.jpg (http://www.imageshack.gr/view.php?file=qmf5byabu9vayvlt1k07.jpg)

Emilovious
09-18-08, 10:29 AM
Excerpt From The Book:

"The Final Days"
By Tony Brown.

The ambulance call was officially logged at 11:18am,
but it's still unclear who actually made that call.
The Samarkand was a residential hotel which is still
owned by Danny Hall. It has not been possible to
verify if each individual room of the hotel had a
separate telephone with adirect outside line at that
time.The ambulance reached the Samarkand Hotel in
nine minutes at 11:27. The crew on board thatmorning
comprised Reginald Jones, who had been an ambulance
attendant for thirty years, and who was driving the
ambulance that day, and John Saua, who had been in
the service for twenty years. Reg Jones's usual crew
partner was off duty on sick leave, and Saua was his
replacement that week.

Reg Jones:

"It was horrific, we arrived at
the flat, the door was flung wide open, nobody about,
just the body on the bed. We called out for someone,
loads of times, so we walked in. We went into the
bedroom, it was very dark because the curtains were
still pulled, I mean the gas fire was on but you
couldn't see anything, your eyes had to adjust.
He was covered in vomit, there was tons of it all
over the pillow, black and brown it was. His airway
was completely blocked all the way down, his tongue
had fallen back, he was flat on his back you see.
The room was dark, we had to pull the curtains.
Well we had to get the police, we only had him and
an empty flat, so John ran up and radioed, got the
aspirator too. We felt his pulse between his shoulders,
pinched his earlobe and nose, showed a light in his
eyes, but there was no response at all. I knew he was
dead as soon as I walked in the room, you get a feel
for it, I can't explain it, but you do and I knew he
was dead. Once the police arrived which seemed like
no time at all, we got him off to the hospital as quick
as we could. See we just have to keep working on him
and we did, my shirt was wringing wet. 'Cos the
ambulances in them days, weren't equipped like they
are now, we had them crazy Wadhams [type of ambulance]
in them days, awful they was. We took him to St. Mary
Abbots. That don't have a casualty ward now but in
them days it did. "That was our designated hospital
for the day. There was a 'bed state' at St. Charles,
you found out at the beginning of your shift what your
designated hospital was."

Did anyone come along in the ambulance with you?

"No, Mr Saua was with Jimi, I didn't
know he was Jimi Hendrix - a bit out of my age group.
When we got him to the hospital, we had to clean the
ambulance out, it really was a mess. His bowels and
bladder, all that goes when you're dead. That flat
must've needed a good clean too."

Did you sit him up in the ambulance?

"Sit him up? No, you don't sit people up when they've
choked. The steps up from the flat were steep,
and you had a natural incline on the way up, but no,
he wasn't sat up."

Did you speak to anyone at the flat or on the way?

'Just the police and hospital staff."

John Saua confirms Reg Jones' story:

"Well I remember we had a hell of a time trying to
suck him out [with an aspirator]. I mean the vomit
was dry, and there was a hell of a lot of it.
The aspirators in those days were all right but
not like you have today, they couldn't shift that lot.
I mean we knew it was hopeless, nothing would have worked.
To tell you the truth, I thought it was an overdose.
It wasn't really my business to diagnose, I just had
to keep working. There were no bed clothes on top of him.
An ambulance crew by law just has to keep on working
on him until we get him to hospital. There was no pulse,
no respiration. We got down to the flat, and there was
nobody but the body on the bed. So we had to radio for
the police from the ambulance. We couldn't touch anything
in the flat. As I say, we knew he was gone, he was on top
of the bed dressed, but I did not recognise him, don't know
anybody would have recognized him, his mother wouldn't
have recognized him. He was in a pool of vomit, it was
everywhere, but we are not doctors, it's our job to keep
trying till we get him to hospital, we can't proclaim him
dead ... I vaguely remember taking a sample of the vomit
in a container, because we didn't know what he had taken.
So as soon as the police arrived, we were off. I was in the
back with Jimi, Reg drove. When we moved him, the gases were
gurgling, you get that when someone has died, it wasn't too
pleasant. The vomit was all the way down, we couldn't have
got an airway down. He was flat on his back, it's a shame he
wasn't on his side because he probably would have pulled
through."

Neither John Saua nor Reg Jones had spoken to each
other since the week they had worked together in September
1970. Reg's usual crew partner had returned and John went
back to his own station - yet their recollections remain
strikingly similar.

John Saua was interviewed for the BBC Radio One's
Wink Of An Eye broadcast on September 10, 1995.
On the programme he said:

"There's a standard procedure especially for someone
who's unconscious. They travel on their side.
All the equipment is there at his head if you need
to do resuscitation, anything like that, it's all there
ready to use."

He reiterates the fact that Monika did not
travel with them to the hospital.

"There was just me and the casualty and Reg the driver.
Nobody else."

In January 1992, David Smith, Press and Public Affairs
Manager of the London Ambulance Service, issued an
official statement after conducting his own investigation
into the conduct of the Ambulance men that morning:

"In light of our extensive enquiries it is apparent that
the ambulance men acted in a proper and professional
manner,"

his statement said.

"There was no one else, except the deceased, at the flat
(22 Lansdowne Crescent, London WI) when they arrived; nor
did anyone else accompany them in the ambulance to St.
Mary Abbots Hospital."

At about 11:30 pm, PC Ian Smith and PC Tom Keene,
police officers attached to nearby Notting Date police
station, responded to the call from ambulance HQ and went
to the Samarkand Hotel. They arrived within minutes of
getting the call.

Ian Smith, now a publican in Aylesbury, remembers that
day vividly:

"We went to a basement flat at Lansdowne Crescent.
The ambulance men were there but Jimi was dead.
It wasn't very pleasant, they had to take some of the
bedding from around him. He was dressed but there was a
lot of mess, so they just wrapped it around his body
and took him off. There was really nothing they could
do for him. We followed them up the stairs. I watched
them put him in the ambulance and take off."

Asked if there was anyone else there, Smith replied.

"No, I remember quite clearly the doors shutting on
the crew and Jimi. We just closed up the flat as there
was no one about. If she'd (Monica) been in the flat,
they would never have called us to come, because they
just could've taken him as normal. But because no one
was there, he was dead and circumstances were a little
odd, suspicious, they radioed their control to get us
in. It wasn't until later in the day that I found out
that it was Jimi Hendrix."

In a subsequent interview with the author, Smith stated:

"I've had a few people coming to interview me.
Basically all I can tell them is that I was around at
the time, I didn't see him, I was there as they were
carrying him out. I didn't know who he was till later."

Tom Keene, the second police officer at the scene,
has never been located.

Freedom
09-18-08, 10:29 AM
http://www.imageshack.gr/files/u1k0ew6dlq5abs0woc1t.jpg (http://www.imageshack.gr/view.php?file=u1k0ew6dlq5abs0woc1t.jpg)

Steev
09-18-08, 10:30 AM
Emil. It was "Webshots" and I'm very happy about it. All your directions (months ago) came fully into play here.
And this was the day to make it work, sadly.
I will post those pix of me & my family later today :) :)
Also, the Mitch & Noel pix I took from the gig I did sound for them in 1987 :)
Thank you brother.

Freedom
09-18-08, 10:30 AM
http://www.imageshack.gr/files/2yuyo4x52tykykskp0eo.jpg (http://www.imageshack.gr/view.php?file=2yuyo4x52tykykskp0eo.jpg)

Steev
09-18-08, 10:32 AM
Freedom. Stunning scans of the "last day"
Especially - Pleasure is all mine my friend...
I might have named it "In Conversation" . . . .
Beautiful pix. Thank you.

Emilovious
09-18-08, 10:35 AM
Freedom, thanks for the scans.
Any chance of doing them in slightly better resolution (these are 96 dpi)?
Thanks anyway!

Steev
09-18-08, 10:37 AM
Emil. I hate that Tony Brown story.
I keep reading it over & over wondering if anybody could have changed just a "speck" of the ending . . . . .
Things might be very different, very different indeed here in 2008 . . . . .

Freedom
09-18-08, 10:53 AM
Freedom, thanks for the scans.
Any chance of doing them in slightly better resolution (these are 96 dpi)?
Thanks anyway!

My pleasure...

No, i scaned them at 600dpi and resized them cause they were way to big (173MB total size and resolutions up to 5100x7014 pixels)...i doubt if i can scan them any better even at 1200dpi with the POS scanner i own... :(

Steev
09-18-08, 10:55 AM
http://inlinethumb02.webshots.com/41601/2184085040104044756S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2184085040104044756SUHLyI)

Steev
09-18-08, 10:59 AM
http://inlinethumb31.webshots.com/7902/2537008450104044756S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2537008450104044756EccqGz)
My yellow in this case is not so mellow
In fact I'm trying to say it's frigthened like me
And all these emotions of mine keep holding me from
Giving my life to a rainbow like you . . . .

Emilovious
09-18-08, 11:21 AM
Three more from Philadelphia '70:

http://img127.imageshack.us/img127/2784/ww14ca0.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

http://img142.imageshack.us/img142/5964/ww15oz2.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

http://img142.imageshack.us/img142/1326/ww16bh2.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
By emilovius (http://profile.imageshack.us/user/emilovius)

Steev
09-18-08, 11:34 AM
Thank you Emil. Was ready to put those up, but clearly
BIGGER IS BETTER ! ! :rimshot:
Thanx E. For U :beer:
Now if I can get a Picture Pump :D
I'll check those settings . . .
Some BEAUTIFUL pix, those Temple shots - Yes?
Thank you for them - You know who :)

Steev
09-18-08, 11:46 AM
http://inlinethumb44.webshots.com/41323/2520654010104044756S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2520654010104044756nWrTCn)

More Temple '70

voodoo_child58
09-18-08, 12:47 PM
I've no words...but THANK YOU

relliott
09-18-08, 01:33 PM
Dusseldorf, Germany Jan. 12, 1969. Published as a poster.

univibs
09-19-08, 10:29 AM
another point of sadness to this day is, the impotence of the English police to catch criminals, it all began with the fact they never maneged to caught Jack the Riper, they didn't find who killed Ashraf Marwan( it was claimed that he committed suicide), they don't know who kidnapped the English girl, and Avcors they didn't know or don't want to know who killed Jimi Hendrix.

in all the above cases they close the files.

there was nothing more easy than to find suspects in the case of Jimi Hendrix's Murder, but nothing happen.

to this day, people all over the world still thinking that Jimi Hendrix Died because of an overdose, which is the most stupidest thing to think if you read little about Hendrix's life and death.

maybe someday the truth will see the light of day,till then, people such as Janie Hendrix will continue to squeeze Jimi's memory to make more and more money...

Sad, so very sad that nobody cares.
people are living their comfortable lives, people today don't want to move their ass to defend the memory of somebody they love.

Jimi, I love you. not only because you are the most brilliant Musician and showman of all times, but mainly because you were the Soundtrack of my life and because of what you are.



this photo was taken by someone who was in the audience, I forgot his name, soon as I'll remember I'll write his name here.
I think it was taken in Hawaii 1969.


RIP Jimi

cosmic
09-19-08, 12:43 PM
Thanks for this!

As I believe there must be something beyond this life, so many people can't be wrong, thst he and friends probably have a good time right now even if we miss him in this world, does this sound weird?
My feeling is that he want all his fans to keep his life, music and legacy flower and prosper in a harsh, cold and uncertain world; for love and understandings in sound!

That's why I say JIP
Jam In Peace, Jimi

Emilovious
09-19-08, 12:53 PM
there was nothing more easy than to find suspects in the case of Jimi Hendrix's ...


I can't say who and why possibly killed Jimi, but circumstances surrounding his death as described in fantastic book "Final Days"
by Tony Brown are very suspicious. What is the role of Monica and Eric Burdon (who was in the flat in early morning) and why were these people never thoroughly questioned including medical staff and police officers (one of them isn't located to this day) is a mystery to me. I might be wrong, but I see a dose of racism as well as attitude towards musicians and specially Jimi who wasn't worth of the real investigation
as a "well known drug addict" and (black) rock musician.

heyyo
09-19-08, 02:01 PM
"When I die, I want people to play my music, go wild and freak out and do anything they want to do." i belive he said, and i think that we are doing a good job on CT to live up with this wish :)

Steev
09-19-08, 04:50 PM
I can't say who and why possibly killed Jimi, but circumstances surrounding his death as described in fantastic book "Final Days"
by Tony Brown are very suspicious. What is the role of Monica and Eric Burdon (who was in the flat in early morning) and why were these people never thoroughly questioned including medical staff and police officers (one of them isn't located to this day) is a mystery to me. I might be wrong, but I see a dose of racism as well as attitude towards musicians and specially Jimi who wasn't worth of the real investigation
as a "well known drug addict" and (black) rock musician.

I believe
To not be open to the possibility and "probability" of this being a prime cause of such a loss in the world we live in today,
is to live with eyes closed.
The death of Jimi Hendrix solved a lot of problems for a "LOT" of people in high positions back in 1970.
I'm gonna stop myself here B4 I go the fuck off.

R.I.P. Friend. If there is rest. Smile if you can . . . . For your life meant more than they can ever know . . . .

MourningStar
09-19-08, 07:32 PM
My pleasure...

No, i scaned them at 600dpi and resized them cause they were way to big (173MB total size and resolutions up to 5100x7014 pixels)...i doubt if i can scan them any better even at 1200dpi with the POS scanner i own... :(You can always up a torrent of the photos!

ilovejimi
09-21-08, 11:07 AM
ABSOLUTLY AMAZING- thank you for sharing:)

Freedom
09-21-08, 11:23 AM
You can always up a torrent of the photos!

I'll try... ;)

Olvator
09-21-08, 11:44 AM
I can't say who and why possibly killed Jimi, but circumstances surrounding his death as described in fantastic book "Final Days"
by Tony Brown are very suspicious. What is the role of Monica and Eric Burdon (who was in the flat in early morning) and why were these people never thoroughly questioned including medical staff and police officers (one of them isn't located to this day) is a mystery to me. I might be wrong, but I see a dose of racism as well as attitude towards musicians and specially Jimi who wasn't worth of the real investigation
as a "well known drug addict" and (black) rock musician.

yes emil....i have been wondering about all that as well, ever since i realized that Eric Burdon and possibly also Alvenia Bridges (?) have been in the flat where Jimi was lying dead on his bed.
Eric at least would have more to say about Monika´s whereabouts during the ambulance arrival. Did they go off together all three after having called the ambulance? still to this day....many questions unanswered. really weird

relliott
09-23-08, 06:21 PM
The photo attached in one of the posts above by univibs is from this site. A much larger version of the photo is available there. It was taken by Bruce C. Moore at the Honolulu June 1, 1969 show.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/brucecmoore/160239259/

Milan
10-06-08, 01:58 PM
Ha... just noticed in this photo that Olvatore posted --

http://www.olve-strelow.de/esc/70-09-05-08.jpg

-- at the bottom right corner it says "Canned Heat - Future Blues"... kinda sad, as that brand new at the time LP was the last masterpiece by the great late Alan "Blind Owl" Wilson, who took his own life 2 days before the above pic was made, on 3. IX 1970... so Canned Heat played their first gig without him in Berlin, 4. IX 1970... where Jimi played as well, of course...

Emilovious
10-06-08, 02:01 PM
Ha... just noticed in this photo that Olvatore posted --

-- at the bottom right corner it says "Canned Heat - Future Blues"... kinda sad, as that brand new at the time LP was the last masterpiece by the great late Alan "Blind Owl" Wilson, who took his own life away 2 days before the above pic was made, on 3. IX 1970... so Canned Heat played their first gig without him in Berlin, 4. IX 1970... where Jimi played as well, of course...



I've noticed the sticker
but didn't know the details about the album and Alan Wilson..
Thanks Milan!

Milan
10-06-08, 02:08 PM
Yo Emil... don't wanna go off-topic too much (although Jimi loved Al)... Alan was amazing character.. he was legally blind. As Fito (CH's drummer) said in his book: "Without the glasses, Alan literally could not recognize the people he played with at two feet, that's how blind the 'Blind Owl' was."

2 years ago I uploaded on Youtube his last filmed appearance, on 28. VI 1970.. he's singing his latest song "Human Condition", written about his experience with the psychiatrist after his 2nd suicide attempt. And two months later he was gone. Check out that sad look -- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PRt8HY_9ug

Sorry for the off-topic bit.

RIP Jimi & Al.

Steev
10-10-08, 03:09 PM
Milan - Man, that You Tube clip was beautiful! Bittersweet indeed.
BTW - Canned Heat was the 1st band I ever saw in my life in 1968, at The Electric Factory in Philly. Snuck out on my dad and had to make up a story about having gone with my buddies to see The Magic Christian movie [with Ringo & Peter Sellers] when I danced back into my house at midnight. . . . Still haven't seen that movie all the way thru to this day ;)
Great memories indeed ! ! ! ! Marcos & Roberto know :D How 'bout you, Olve?
Difficult to explain properly to those that didn't get a chance, or were too young to make the Scene at the time . . . .
But things will never ever be the same. And sadly, maybe they shouldn't :rasta:
Thanx mon ami :beer:
Peace

Olvator
10-10-08, 03:19 PM
never heard bout that movie....gotta check it out. The Canned Heat suitcase is in the picture, cause Sly & Family Stone /Canned Heat / Hendrix and Ten Years After were all together on the road to Fehmarn...that bag belongs to the Heat I guess

crazy_cat
09-18-11, 02:14 PM
http://i28.fastpic.ru/big/2011/0918/2c/d3d9efe8f1c9142dd9900d47fc7b262c.jpg
http://i27.fastpic.ru/big/2011/0918/60/614f2661e69035e32087f4918c718b60.jpg