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Herman Cherusken
10-14-08, 07:59 PM
I have this list of Hendrix literature that I am about to purchase over time, but not necessarily as in the order listed below:

Ken Shadwick - Jimi Hendrix: Musician
Mary Willix - Jimi Hendrix, Voices From Home
Noel Redding - Are You Experienced? The Inside Story Of The Jimi Hendrix Experience
Mitch Mitchell - Jimi Hendrix: Inside The Experience
Eddie Kramer - Hendrix: Setting The Record Straight
John McDermott - Jimi Hendrix Sessions: The Complete Studio Recording Sessions, 1963-1970
Harry Shapiro - Jimi Hendrix: Electriv Gypsy
Charles R Cross - Room Full Of Mirrors: A Biography Of Jimi Hendrix
Black Gold - The Lost Archives of Jimi Hendrix

I have Tony Brown's "Hendrix: The Final Days" on its way right now, but if I would like a more factual account as far as all his studio recordings, song writing and his concerts, do you guys have any recommendations other than perhaps John McDermott's "Jimi Hendrix Sessions: The Complete Studio Recording Sessions, 1963-1970"? Equipment and gadges doesnt interest me at this point, since my own playing days are over as my fingers on my right hand are screwed. But what would be cool is to track whan about every song was written and recorded, or in the process of being recorded. Jimi's thought process surrounding the lyrics are naturally interesting in the broader picture, but at this point I am more interested in what, when and together with whom.

Any input on this?

Herman Cherusken
10-14-08, 08:29 PM
I guess I found one, "The Complete Guide to the Music of Jimi Hendrix," by Peter Doggertt. http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1844494241/ref=ord_cart_shr?_encoding=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&v=glance So I ordered that one together with Harry Shapiro's "Jimi Hendrix: Electriv Gypsy." The latter has gotten some negative reviews by some, while others are over the moon for it's encyclopedic scope...

I start there, but please put in some words on good reading experiences, and a few words about why you thought it to be good, or bad...

MourningStar
10-14-08, 09:36 PM
Black Gold: The Lost Archives of Jimi Hendrix by Steven Roby

Emilovious
10-15-08, 02:09 AM
I guess I found one, "The Complete Guide to the Music of Jimi Hendrix," by Peter Doggertt. http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1844494241/ref=ord_cart_shr?_encoding=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&v=glance So I ordered that one together with Harry Shapiro's "Jimi Hendrix: Electriv Gypsy." The latter has gotten some negative reviews by some, while others are over the moon for it's encyclopedic scope...

I start there, but please put in some words on good reading experiences, and a few words about why you thought it to be good, or bad...


Complete Guide by P.D. is worthless. Forget about it.
Electric Gypsy (2nd edition), with great biography, comprehensive discography and a lot about technical side of things (equipment, studios etc...) is a must.
You'll find Shadwick's "Musician" a great read too with "Hendrix Gear"
written by Douglas J. Noble at the end.
You must also order latest edition of "From The Benjamin Franklin Studios" and "Studio Log".

However, for true and up-to-date dicography there are only
Internet sites, and only two of a real value,
Doug's;
http://home.earthlink.net/~ldouglasbell/jimi.htm

and Hans-Peter's:
http://home.online.no/~hpjohnse/hendrix.html

copifunk
10-15-08, 05:36 AM
The Final Days of Jimi Hendrix by Tony Brown.
* My favorite book of all time and i have them all !!!

Olvator
10-15-08, 06:00 AM
i also enjoyed (AFTER having read all the other books EMil already emntioned) Eyewitness by Johnny Black! Some interviews and quotes in there that i had never come across in any other publication. But I guess this is for the fanatics....

Ayler
10-15-08, 06:31 AM
Ken Shadwick - Jimi Hendrix: Musician
It's Keith, not Ken. He was a good sax player, and sadly passed away this year.
I've read many Hendrix bio, his one is the best, the most serious, from a man who knew what he talked about when he talked about music. The definitive bio IHMO, much better than's Shapiro's or McDermott's.

By the way, it's McDermott who wrote Hendrix: Setting The Record Straight, with the help of Eddie Kramer. Ironical?

MourningStar
10-15-08, 10:13 AM
Regarding the Noel Redding book. Most depressing book I have ever read. I was sort of bummed that I could not even bring myself to pity the sad character. I only had one word about this bloke when I finished it. Loser! It's in the round file now.

your mileage may vary,

MourningStar
10-15-08, 11:27 PM
Hendrix by Chris Welch

stplsd
10-16-08, 01:57 PM
The Making Of Are You Experienced by Sean Egan is also worth a read, it has several new interviews of people close to Jimi at the time and describes the scene in London at the time very well.

Ben Valkhoff's 'Eyewitness' books (3 vols: 1966-67; 1968; 1969-70) are a must have for concert info, reviews, photos etc

DevilsAvocado
10-16-08, 02:12 PM
The one i have the fewest issues with, is McDermott and Kramer's "Hendrix: Setting The Record Straight", although it could use an update.

Ayler
10-16-08, 03:26 PM
The one i have the fewest issues with, is McDermott and Kramer's "Hendrix: Setting The Record Straight", although it could use an update.There's a BIG mistake in this one: McDermott talked about the Paris 68 "Red House" version as if Noel Redding was playing lead!

DevilsAvocado
10-16-08, 04:18 PM
Yes, as you'll notice, i didnt say it was perfect. Also, i don't know how many times Billy Rich is mentioned in that book, only to be all but omitted in the "Sessions" follow-up.

None of them probably are perfect, but i prefer the tone of that book, compared to many others. Many of them are simply too "Fan-ish" for my taste. "Electric Gypsy" might as well be called "Jimi Is God And Couldnt Do A Single Thing Wrong".

As for Roby's "Black Gold", i think he draws some weird conclusions from time to time. For instance, his argumentation as to why the original masters weren't used for the Fillmore East release is strange, and makes me suspect the man has no knowledge as to how records are produced at all. At other times he just plainly contradicts himself.
.
Noel's book could be boiled down to one sentence: "I didn't get my money", and Mitch's book is superficial to say the least. Notice how he talks about the last tour with Billy and Jimi in that book, compared to how he talks about it now...

"Room Full Of Mirrors" is an entertaining read, but i seriously question some of the original research done by Cross, to the point where i think some of it is complete fabrication, as some of it hasn't even been hinted at in other books.

Don't get me started on Welch's "Hendrix", which to me seems like a fan-pamphlet of the kind you hand out at shows. Only of value, if you really want to believe that Jimi didn't play a single note worthy of hearing, after Axis was released...

I will not even mention (well i did...) the "works" of Henderson, Danneman, Knight, etc.

Ayler
10-16-08, 04:43 PM
None of them probably are perfect, but i prefer the tone of that book, compared to many others.You're right. Mistakes don't mean bad book. McDermott wrote here one of my favorite.

But I have to admit that it's sad to see that McDermott & Kramer choices, since they're producing Hendrix records, seem to forget what they say in this book. When you read their comments about Douglas Live albums... it's hard to understand that they produced records as "Blue Wild Angel" or "Live At Fillmore" disc 2.

DevilsAvocado
10-16-08, 05:16 PM
Indeed. Or their (and Experience Hendrix's) criticism of Alan Douglas, for wiping original contributions on Jimi's songs on "Crash Landing", when they in fact did the exact same thing with the Santana/Clarke/Williams version of "Spanish Castle Magic". On the "In From The Storm "tribute, it's sung by Sass Jordan, but on the "Power Of Soul" disc, they replaced her vocals with Corey Glover. Oh, and they omitted the symphony orchestra as well. Otherwise, it's the exact same thing...
In that light, their point seems to be, "Oh we can do it with anybody else's tracks, just not Jimi's"...

MourningStar
10-16-08, 10:44 PM
Jimi Hendrix: The Ultimate Experience by Johnny Black

Ayler
10-17-08, 02:31 AM
in fact did the exact same thing with the Santana/Clarke/Williams version of "Spanish Castle Magic". On the "In From The Storm "tribute, it's sung by Sass Jordan, but on the "Power Of Soul" disc, they replaced her vocals with Corey Glover. Oh, and they omitted the symphony orchestra as well. Otherwise, it's the exact same thing...I have to say that I think the one with Corey Glover is much better IMHO. Even the guitar sound of Carlos (same guitar part indeed) is better.

Herman Cherusken
10-18-08, 02:09 PM
Good suggestions made here, and I will pick up on them over time. Right now I have three of them on the way and I anticipate a good read...

I know Jimi was a spiritual guy, more so than perhaps most would think, and I believe that his consciousness was on a higher level, although on a personal level having the same basic flawes as most human beings have in various shapes or forms.

But I bumped in to this review yesterday of Curtis Knight's Jimi Hendrix: Starchild (1992) and I wonder if any of you have read it. I dont know what to make out of it yet, as a number of the claims are beyond me, but here is the review:

http://www.epinions.com/review/Jimi_Hendrix_Starchild_by_Curtis_Knight/content_426744057476

And a general book presentation with customer reviews: http://www.amazon.com/Jimi-Hendrix-Starchild-Curtis-Knight/dp/0938294318

DevilsAvocado
10-18-08, 04:13 PM
I haven't read that particular one. But if, as is stated, it's a revision of his first book, i think you should proceed with caution... Knight grossly exaggerates his role in Jimi's career, and i suspect his memory has a few too many hits of acid "in the lineage" (to stay with the lingo of this site) to be believable...

stplsd
10-22-08, 06:40 PM
^
Starchild is just generally complete nonsense by this "spaceman", but does contain what appear to be genuine interviews by him of people associated with Jimi etc. and quite long extracts from interviews of others from various hard to get publications like Spare Rib etc. Although some of these he attempts to pass off as his own.

stplsd
10-22-08, 06:47 PM
Regarding the Noel Redding book. Most depressing book I have ever read. I was sort of bummed that I could not even bring myself to pity the sad character. I only had one word about this bloke when I finished it. Loser! It's in the round file now. your mileage may vary,

Noel's book is an extremely valuable source of fairly reliable firsthand information on the original Experience, the general scene and relationships of those days, and the legal details of how financially screwed they all were. His is the only firsthand account of these things from the inside. No one else kept a diary of these days, or is as consistently reliable. In fact there is no one else.

Herman Cherusken
10-26-08, 12:31 PM
Cherokee Mist: The Lost Writings (Paperback)

This book features long lost artwork. writing and lyrics by the man himself: Jimi Hendrix. It is an impressive collection of different pieces of this legendary artist's short but brilliant life. Jimi's handwritten lyrics and artwork take you to a place that only a select few have seen and known about, until now. This book is like reading a bible on Hendrix and his life. It's so personal and revealing that you feel like you're almost inside the man's head!!! It is that personal. It is also intensely moving and hilarious at times.(particularly the lyrics to Astro Man!!) It is profusely illustrated with pictures of Hendrix and quotes and drawings. It is very impressive. If you can find this book, BUY IT!!!

--------

"Do not ignore the sun for the sun is the truth shining to be seen," Jimi Hendrix said. Which from our point of view is Jimi Hendrix expressing his religion, saying that you should not ignore god for he is the truth shining to be seen. The words above are a quote from the book "Jimi Hendrix The Lost Writings." Notes Compiled by Bill Nitopi. After Jimi Hendrix died September 18, 1970 his house was ransacked, and almost everything was stolen. Alot of the lost writing were relocated, bought on the black market or recovered in auction houses. They were all brought together to form this book. Even though his handwriting wasn't the best, it is for the most part legible. In this book you can really understand what he was thinking almost until the day he died. It has notes of his feelings during his music career. The notes taken on his feelings talk about things like how a concert went, his feelings about abortion, and even on the wars that were going on. There were also a few stories he had written, along with songs that were published and not published. In this book there are pictures of what Jimi Hendrix was doing on and off the stage. If you are a musician who has trouble writing lyrics this book will give you tons of ideas for songs though there is no plot to this book just notes Jimi had written. So, all in all, if you are a poet or a song writer you may want to pusue this book if not you are better reading a biography.

Source: http://www.amazon.com/Cherokee-Mist-Writings-Jimi-Hendrix/dp/0060925620

Steev
10-26-08, 02:19 PM
I've had Cherokee Mist: The Lost Writings for many many years. Always interesting to leaf thru.

Funny Olve should mention Johnny Black. Never heard of him, or the book you mentioned, but I just picked up one by him I had not seen, from Amazon for .46 cents [used, great condition] called
Jimi Hendrix: The Ultimate Experience
It is a timeline from his birth till the end and is a book of dated quotes from people in his life and the dates they were made. Gigs-Memorable notes from Mitch, Noel, Clapton, McCartney, Chas, Dad, club owners, on & on - you get the idea. I'm only half way thru it . . .
BUT!!! In the center, there are 2 sections of glossy's I have never seen B4 [That's not saying much] :D and they are exquisite! The binding is too tight to lay properly on a scanner, so I'm almost contemplating buying another used one to tear up & pull the pix out . . . Used ones there now for .47 cents.

http://www.amazon.com/Jimi-Hendrix-Experience-Johnny-Black/dp/1560252405/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1225049957&sr=1-6

Fascinating shit [who knows about the validity] like Jimi & Janis started a brief affair the night they met at Singers Bowl [She opened 4 him-which I always knew] and they experimented with Heroin together. Again, who knows? Very short-lived affair . . . .
LOTS of Chas memoirs also. Dates they signed, spoke, did, went, left, returned, rehearsed, recorded, gigged, said, lived, split. The only fight they ever had in a studio [till it went sour] After Jimi complained he couldn't record a record there [Kingsway] due to volume constraints, Chas, who had just returned from the Visa Office, threw a passport & a return ticket to America at Jimi & said "Go on then. Fuck off back to America." And Jimi just burst out laughing. That was the end of that and we never argued again . . .
I did sneak to the last 10 pages to see his spin on "The End" though, which is NEVER a good read :(
Anyway the pics are enough to warrant the purchase, so I wanted to note it here.
Peace

dino77
10-26-08, 02:20 PM
I just re-read "Setting the record straight", and indeed McDermott
and Kramer are VERY critical of, for example, the old "Isle of Wight" album.
Fast forward ten years and they produce and release the whole bloody thing with the tracks they criticised. Dollars....
Otherwise it's the best book on the economical/organisational
aspect on the Hendrix organisation. It's bloody useless on music, though,
with many factual errors.
Chadwick's book is great on the music, Charles' on the Seattle days
and Electric Gypsy covers many bases.

tallboy333
07-26-09, 09:32 PM
I have most of the books you mention here. It is fascinating to me how one man in his short life could cause so many people to "remember" completely different events or in so many different ways. Even today the legend of Jimi Hendrix continues to twist in and around itself like a snake swallowing its tail (Ouroborous).

One of the claims I found especially incredulous was the theory put forth in Roomful of Mirrors about Jimi claiming to be homosexual in order to get out of the army. A pretty bold claim to be making without Jimi's actual discharge records to back it up. Most reports have him getting injured during a jump and being discharged for that. Indeed it seems Jimi enjoyed his army life somewhat, reading the letters he wrote back to his family. Maybe he would have even stayed in if not for this. Anyone care to elaborate on this cryptical "theory"?
I am also reading the biography of Neil Young "Shakey" right now. In it Larry Kurzon (Stills' agent at the time) mentions that Stephen Stills originally recorded "Love the One You're With" with a wild solo overdubbed by Hendrix "it was a one-take electric lead-he just dropped his guitar and walked out the door. It was an animal, this record..." He was stunned when he heard the finished record weeks later. "There was no more Hendrix...(Stephen) replaced it with a steel drum solo that he played himself." Bassist Greg Reeves claimed it was the last thing Jimi recorded before his death. Any chance a demo of this version might still be sitting around in the vault somewhere?

One of my favorite books about Jimi's life and impact is Eric Burdon's autobiography, "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood." There is a lot of stuff in there about Jimi's early days, and also his death, as Eric was the first person Monika called after she realized something was wrong (assuming her account is truthful, which is becoming more and more questionable as the evidence is examined more closely). One thing is for sure, time only adds to Jimi's legend and the more that is written and "remembered" the foggier the truth gets and the larger Jimi's shadow looms inside of it.

ElectricWing
07-26-09, 09:49 PM
One of the claims I found especially incredulous was the theory put forth in Roomful of Mirrors about Jimi claiming to be homosexual in order to get out of the army. A pretty bold claim to be making without Jimi's actual discharge records to back it up. Most reports have him getting injured during a jump and being discharged for that. Indeed it seems Jimi enjoyed his army life somewhat, reading the letters he wrote back to his family. Maybe he would have even stayed in if not for this. Anyone care to elaborate on this cryptical "theory"?


Jimi couldn't stand the army and was, by all reported accounts, a terrible soldier. I doubt he would tell his family that in his letters though:

http://www.thesmokinggun.com/archive/0803051jimi1.html

MourningStar
07-27-09, 12:36 AM
Anyone seen a copy of Hendrix's DD214?

Anyone have a photo of Jimi in uniform that clearly
displays the Screaming Eagle patch or Paratroop wings?

FWIW :

"Book Reveals Hendrix Used Gay Ruse to Avoid 'Nam"
– by Gene Johnson, AP, 1 August 2005

˜Hendrix's Army records indicate he was discharged for "homosexual tendencies," not a broken ankle as he had claimed publicly.'

Nonsense!

Something doesn't sit right with the army documents used to come to the above "conclusion." These documents are also unsigned (and they may in fact be FAKE) which makes whatever stated on said papers unofficial, useless and thus irrelevant. Furthermore, these papers contain tons of blue ink, something army officials NEVER use!

Fact: The OFFICIAL army "report of transfer or discharge" form DD 214 (signed by Hendrix and an army official) state the following reason for DISCHARGE ( ("under honorable conditions") :

"reason and authority: AR 635-209 SPN 46A"

Discharge Code 46A = " Unsuitability, apathy, defective attitudes & inability to extend effort constructively."

Nothing in there about being gay at all! What's more, there are eight other codes (#s 251-257 & 586) that deal specifically with homosexuality and homosexual conduct. None of these codes were used for Jimi's discharge.

It pathetic that gossip news (ala the AP statement) is being used to promote a Hendrix book...

C. Glebbeek
(Editor)


NB With thanks to UniVibes subscriber B. Bieniek for additional army research.

in anycase, I recall literature stating that a 'legal' matter/magistrate forced Jimi into choosing jail time or military-service time (typical of the era and more so with the black man). well, under these circumstances who wouldn't have a miserable time serving ....



peace,

purple jim
07-27-09, 12:56 AM
Hey, I don't think anyone has mentioned Charles Shaar Murray's excellent "Crosstown Traffic" which brilliantly places Jimi within his historical context.

bbagm
07-27-09, 06:27 AM
Regarding the Noel Redding book. Most depressing book I have ever read. I was sort of bummed that I could not even bring myself to pity the sad character. I only had one word about this bloke when I finished it. Loser! It's in the round file now.

your mileage may vary,

I found it an interesting read for the first half, after which it got bogged down with music industry legal business which he was obviously still very pissed off about. It seemed to me his was using the book to vent his spleen in that respect. I'd agree Noel was a loser, but only in the unfortunate sense that he got well and truly shafted for payment and dues post-Hendrix. His book is essential reading purely because he was a member of the Hendrix band.

Talking of band member's books, I felt quite let down by Mitch's. It has tons of great pictures, but therein lies the problem. It comes across as a picture book with comments by Mitch, when it probably would have been better if he'd written a "proper" book like Noel and left the picture books to be written by fans.

As for other books, "Crosstown Traffic" is an essential Hendrix read. It really explains the roots and origins of his music, placing everything in a social and historical context, showing exactly how Hendrix was just one unique and distinct part of a huge ever flowing and ever evolving musical river.

The Curtis Knight book? Definitely 50/50. Knight was very close to Hendrix just pre-Experience, but sometimes I got the feeling (no pun intended!) that he was using that connection to build his own myth, creating fame by association. Which left me wondering how much of what he said should be taken with a pinch of salt.

scoutship
07-27-09, 09:42 AM
Regarding Johnny Black's book, I've not had a look at it in some time, but it is comprised of almost entirely other sources and the quotes ETC are often snipped in ways that misrepresent info.

About the Army documents, C Glebbeek's criticism of them was debunked LONG ago, they are genuine (but some missing; in fact part of one not included among the smokinggun collection can be seen in the doc Leon's people put together; Steve Roby requested copies of all the docs and the evidence is he didn't get all of them, either) and the stuff about the 'blue ink' and so forth is just twaddle, both blue and black ink were used by the Army, it just has to show up on photocopies.

Also re the "broken ankle," sometimes injured back, there are no medical documents ever turned up to support either of those stories, either.

There are like what, 60-ish odd bios now? Often most interesting for what they don't say....

scoutship
07-27-09, 09:51 AM
p.s. btw would love to read the rest of that letter Jimi sent home in Aug '70 (where he 'misspells' Janie as "Jenny"), but EH is pretty tight with that one.

purple jim
07-27-09, 12:18 PM
p.s. btw would love to read the rest of that letter Jimi sent home in Aug '70 (where he 'misspells' Janie as "Jenny"), but EH is pretty tight with that one.

Yeah, Jenny whatshername.:)

thunderbaas
07-28-09, 02:57 AM
There is a great reissue of "Sesions" by McDermott,called "Ultimate Hendrix" which not only sums up his studio work,but also surveys his live performances.Though there are some flaws (See one of the former posts in the "Everything Else" section called "Erata Ultimate Hendrix") I still think this is a great read,and to me there was some great new info along with some great foto's (Did anyone know for instance,that Chas Chandler played the bassline on the official "Hey Joe" studio version,but Chas didn't want this to be known,until he and Noel Redding past away,so to not embarras Noel.To me it explains why there's such a strong bassline on this early one.Noel was still transforming from guitarplayer to bassplayer at this moment) "Cross Town Traffic" by Charles Shaar Murray is a great read also. So Herman,there's still a lot to read I'd say. I wish you lots of succes finding them ( "Ultimate Hendrix" can still be ordered,I ordered it overhere in Holland by a major bookshop,and had to wait for it 1 & 1/2 month,but you'll find it on amazon as well I presume)

Thunderbaas.

stplsd
07-28-09, 04:44 AM
^
Yes, it does have a lot of new info. And one or two nice photos. But it is also riddled with innacuracies, and some of the new info could do with being questioned and backed up with other observations/info etc. esp the Billy Rich story about the Gypsy sun & rainbows "audition" at Salvation?
Is there anything to back up Chandler's claim?

stplsd
07-28-09, 04:49 AM
About the Army documents, C Glebbeek's criticism of them was debunked LONG ago, they are genuine (but some missing; in fact part of one not included among the smokinggun collection can be seen in the doc Leon's people put together; Steve Roby requested copies of all the docs and the evidence is he didn't get all of them, either) ..

Please, a little more info on the debunking. I've not seen anything that shows Cross' claim to be valid. And what's this "doc Leon's people etc"?

stplsd
10-27-09, 09:13 PM
A valuable insight into the standard of group/management finances/mutual intoxication at this time is in Andrew Motion's [poet laureate UK] excellent study 'The Lambert's' of which the third part is about Kit, one of the two manager's of the Who, a real eye opener. Kit & Chris Stamp [Track Records] took the same high percentage - 40%, split 50/50 as Mike & Chas did (a year later) with Jimi Hendrix.

Hogtown
04-19-11, 03:54 PM
As for other books, "Crosstown Traffic" is an essential Hendrix read. It really explains the roots and origins of his music, placing everything in a social and historical context, showing exactly how Hendrix was just one unique and distinct part of a huge ever flowing and ever evolving musical river.

I just finished this book last night. I am still not sure what to think of it. It is interesting, as it is less a biography than an opinion of Hendrix's place and influence in history, which is quite subjective. So, worth checking out for a different take from the typical biography.