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View Full Version : What They Said About THE MAN



MourningStar
10-20-08, 02:49 PM
Pick a favorite quote about Jimi (posting of photo of author optional, but would be so cool):
*********************************************
The legendary Les Paul
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/l_t.jpg

12.1965
"I went in and stood in the doorway to listen. I was really impressed by what I heard. Yes indeed, that dude was really working his guitar over. He was bending string, playing funky as hell. I'd never seen anyone so radical."

cosmic
10-20-08, 03:00 PM
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Studios/2786/yngwie308.jpg

Said by this man:

"What impressed me most about Jimi Hendrix was his stage performance, his cool image and totally wild stage moves (like burning his guitar and torrents of feedback off the Marshalls). He was the ultimate showman. His guitar riffs are not that difficult by today's standards, so it was more the fact that he was very flamboyant and different from his peers that impressed me the most, plus the extreme feeling that he put into his blues playing. That's why I like to cover a lot of his songs, which are also in my vocal range."

MourningStar
10-20-08, 03:56 PM
John McLaughlin
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/mclaughlin2.gif

"Jimi single-handedly shifted the whole course of guitar playing and he did it with such finesse and real passion."

MourningStar
10-20-08, 05:09 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/eric_clapton.jpg

-1966
"... he played this gig that was blinding ... I knew what the guy was capable of from the minute I met him. It was the complete embodiment of all aspects of rock guitar rolled into one."

MourningStar
10-20-08, 10:15 PM
Jim Marshall
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/marshall.gif

8.10.1966
"Jimi, without doubt, became our greatest ambassador."

MourningStar
10-21-08, 12:43 AM
Brian May
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/BrianMay.jpg

29.01.1967
"When I saw him supporting The Who, I couldn't believe it. I felt excited, overwhelmed and also completely deflated. I'd put a lot of work into playing guitar and was thinking I was pretty damned good. But Hendrix came along and destroyed everyone."

MourningStar
10-21-08, 12:03 PM
Eddie Kramer
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/kramer1.jpg

Regarding 'Star Spangled Banner' : "I thought it was a pretty unique rendition of the song. I was intrigued by the fact that Jimi was able to make the guitar sound like an early synthesizer, pre-dating the guitar synthesizer which came years later."

"Jimi's music is so universal. And kids who are getting into rock 'n' roll guitar, who's the go-to guy? It's Jimi. That's the first place you start and everything else comes from that."

Steev
10-21-08, 12:51 PM
AMEN EDDIE KRAMER ! ! ! ! !
Nice one Marcos :)

MourningStar
10-22-08, 11:35 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/705417.jpg

August 1966
"I was the hot-shot guitarist on the block. I thought I was it. I'd never heard of Hendrix. Then someone said, 'You've got to see the guitar player with John Hammond.' I went straight across the street and saw him. Hendrix knew who I was and, that day, in front of my eyes, he burned me to death. H-bombs were going off, guided missles were flying - I can't tell you the sounds he was getting out of his instrument. He was getting every sound I was ever to hear him get with a Stratocaster, a twin, a Maestro fuzztone and that was all. He just got right up in my face with that axe and I didn't even want to pick up a guitar for the next year."

MourningStar
10-23-08, 11:40 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/Dave_Mason_Program2.jpg

"Jimi would get up - jeans, suede jacket, big electric hairdo - and just blow everybody away. I remember thinking I might as well take up another instrument."

hawkfan369
10-23-08, 11:45 AM
"I put on my Hendrix album and my son said, 'Daddy, who's that?' and I said, 'Well son, that's God.'"

ROBERT PLANT

MourningStar
10-23-08, 12:11 PM
"I put on my Hendrix album and my son said, 'Daddy, who's that?' and I said, 'Well son, that's God.'"

ROBERT PLANT
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/plant.jpg
Awesome!!!

MourningStar
10-23-08, 03:00 PM
Albert Collins
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/collins.jpg

"I met Hendrix when he was playing with Little Richard. Ooooh man, he was powerful even then, he could play some blues."

MourningStar
10-23-08, 03:15 PM
Paul McCartney
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/paul.jpg

"He was very self-effacing about his music but then when he picked up that guitar he was just a monster."

MourningStar
10-25-08, 07:58 PM
Dylan
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/Dylan.jpg

August 1966
"First time I saw him he was playing with John Hammond. He was incredible then. I'd already been to England and beyond, and although he didn't sing, I kinda had a feeling that he figured into things."

MourningStar
10-26-08, 04:17 PM
Miles
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/Miles.jpg

"Jimi Hendrix came from the blues like me. We understood each other right away because of that. He was a blues guitarist."

MourningStar
10-26-08, 05:03 PM
Joe Satriani
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/satriani.jpg

1992
"Two months after my 14th birthday, Jimi Hendrix died -- and after that I really committed myself to learning how to play guitar. The concept of him not being around anymore to make records was so horrible, and when he passed away, I didn’t know what to do. The only positive step I could take was to start playing in earnest myself -- to fill the void in my life. ... My affection for Hendrix is difficult to explain, as are any emotional feelings and events in life. I remember listening to Hendrix records when I was very young, probably around 10 years old, and being transfixed. Listening to his music was a deep, cathartic experience that was a little embarrassing to talk about as a little kid -- I didn’t see anyone else my age flipping out when they put on ‘Third Stone from the Sun.’ I had to get ready to listen to that song, so I knew it was doing something to me. The first time I listened to it all the way through, I felt as if my heart and mind had just been put through the wringer -- and it’s difficult for a 10-year-old to put those feelings into words. To be able to listen to his music like that was like a gift from one human being to another."

MourningStar
10-26-08, 06:03 PM
Mick Taylor
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/MICK-Taylor.jpg

"I think he knew he was blessed, and when you know that, you don't take too much credit for yourself."

MourningStar
10-26-08, 07:10 PM
Eddie Van Halen
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/EVH.jpg

"As I started buying records it was stuff like Hendrix ... Hendrix blew my mind like everybody's. One of my favorite solos is the second one in 'All Along the Watchtower' - I get goosebumps every time I hear it."

ilovejimi
10-26-08, 07:40 PM
I think Jimi would have liked Eruption. :wave:-- "have you seen junior's grades?".

he would of also liked Cliffs of Dover by Santraini

MourningStar
10-26-08, 09:37 PM
Billy
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/BCox.jpg

"There are those who come before the public eye and are commercialized into the consciousness of the masses. We are told they are popular, and we echo, they are popular. Then there are a few who are so intuitively tuned into the universe that they are still influential even though they are beyond sight. This is immortality, and Jimi Hendrix is immortal. It is exciting to know that the world has yet to truly be exposed to Jimi's genius. Maybe the rumors that are used by some to cloud his image will be replaced by an understanding of the man I knew - a child of the universe, a guitar maser, a warm and gentle soul."

Steev
10-27-08, 11:01 AM
Man, I don't know what we're going to do now that Jimi Hendrix copped out on us . . .
He was the only black cat who could play psychedelic.

Bo Diddley - 1974

MourningStar
10-28-08, 07:21 PM
"Man, I don't know what we're going to do now that Jimi Hendrix copped out on us . . .
He was the only black cat who could play psychedelic."

Bo Diddley - 1974

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/BoDiddley-1.jpg
Awesome Steev!!!

Steev
10-28-08, 09:23 PM
April 1965:
Jimmy returns to the Little Richard entourage in time to do a gig at the Whiskey-a-Go Go in Atlanta
Marquette [Little Richard's road manager]
Richard used to allow him to do that playing with his teeth onstage, and take solos.
It became part of the act, all that playing behind his back and stuff.
Richard taught Hendrix a lot of things, and Hendrix copied a lot of things from Richard.
Richard used to say, "Look, don't be ashamed to do whatever you feel. The people can tell if you're a phony.
They can feel it out in the audience."

MourningStar
10-29-08, 12:21 AM
B. B. King

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/bbKing.gif

"When you heard Jimi Hendrix you knew it was Jimi Hendrix, he introduced himself with his instrument. His attack to a guitar, man, was, oh, something else. ...Jimi played blues and played it well and he played good blues."

MourningStar
10-29-08, 10:45 PM
Brian Jones

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/BrianJones.jpg

"Jimi Hendrix is the most exciting guitarist I've ever heard." - Brian Jones

MourningStar
10-30-08, 10:25 AM
Junior Brown - (the Jimi of C & W)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/Junior.jpg

"Hendrix was back there with a few of the others who were like my training wheels ... hearing him as a teenager taught me to look at the guitar in a different way - and how to tap into that thing inside of me that was already leaning toward improvisation. You learn other players' licks at first; Then you take off the training wheels and start using the licks as building blocks to make your own thing. That's how influences work. Somewhere in whatever I do, there's a little bit of Hendrix -"

Steev
10-30-08, 02:46 PM
Les Paul - December 1965

It was one of those funny nights. My #2 son, Gene & I were taking Master tapes from our home in Mahwah NJ to Columbia Records in NY.

We decided to drive by a nightclub in Lodi NJ, which usually had good talent. I stopped the car, and as usual, Gene looked in. He came back out & said, "Father, you better look for yourself. There's a guy playing all over the guitar."

I went in and stood in the doorway to listen. I was really impressed with what I heard. Yes indeed, that dude was really working his guitar over. He was bending string, playing funky as hell. I'd never seen anyone so radical.

We had to push on to NY, but we decided that after we'd dumped those tapes, we'd hurry back to the club and nail that guy.

A couple of hours later, that's what we tried to do. When we got back and asked around, the bartender told me some black dude had come in earlier to audition, but his playing was too crazy for them-too wild and too loud, so he and the group he was with hadn't been hired. When last seen, about an hour before Gene & I could get back, the guitarist had been fooling around on the piano in the club. That's all anyone in the club could tell us. No one knew his name or where he could be found.

Gene and I called musicians' locals all around NY & NJ-No one knew who we were talking about. Finally, we decided to look in every single nightclub in North & Central Jersey, and also in Harlem, uptown. But with no name and only a description of a wild man with a guitar - different than what's around, more funky, raunchy - people just looked at us . . . . .

Roland Stone
10-30-08, 03:19 PM
http://www.hendrixguitars.com/Images/Barney%20Kessel.jpg

From Spectropop.Com: Barney Kessel's son Dan on the Kessel/Hendrix connection:

"Several years before that in late 1966 and part of 1967 when my brother David and I were kids, we were in Switzerland, England and Lichtenstein for a while. We were completely into Phil Spector and Brian Wilson. We'd been at the 'River Deep - Mountain High' and 'Good Vibrations/Pet Sounds' sessions at Gold Star, which our father played on. We loved the Byrds, whom we'd seen perform 'Eight Miles High' on Sunset Strip with our step-brothers Mickey and Tim, and other L.A. bands like Love and the Doors. And we were digging the whole late mod/early psychedelic English thing. I was listening to Radio Luxembourg and Radio Caroline on my AM/FM/short wave and reading Melody Maker, Fab 208, NME, Record Mirror, etc. And, we got to see some of the early Pink Floyd gigs in London. Intoxicating stuff, all!

"Anyway, we were in London when the Jimi Hendrix Experience was first formed. We were up on all the buzz and we pestered our dad for us to go see Hendrix's band at the Bag O' Nails club in Soho. He was busy with his own scene but he did arrange for David and me to get into the club. Of course, Jimi, Noel Redding and Mitch Mitchell were phenomenal. We had our minds blown, plus, we were in awe that Brian Jones, McCartney and the rest of England's rock elite were all there in the audience. We saw several of his London shows and got to meet him and hang out a few times. We totally flipped over Hendrix. And, we were stoked when he told us he was in awe of our father. After that, we did nothing but rave about Jimi all the time, till it got to be too much and people finally had to tell us to shut up.

"Being a virtuoso jazz artist, our father wasn't musically impressed with rock guitarists unless they had a real grasp of blues or country roots. Because, although a jazz purist, his foundation was in blues and country and western swing. So, with much lobbying from my brother and me, he'd come to appreciate some of the Eric Clapton, Peter Green and Mick Taylor stuff with John Mayall, and some of Jeff Beck's stuff. With Jimi, though, he resisted the whole circus atmosphere, the pyrotechnics and psychedelic posturing. But, after we kept playing him our Hendrix records, he eventually appreciated that behind the excessive image, Jimi was actually an innovative blues guitarist, who had taken it into the next dimension. And, he liked Mitch Mitchel's playing too, saying Mitch was the jazziest rock drummer he'd heard. He also commented that he thought Jimi's vocals were unique. We agreed and added that we liked Noel's hair."

MourningStar
10-30-08, 10:29 PM
Ronnie Wood

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/ronniwWoodDB.jpg

"Back in those days, all us skinny white British kids were trying to look cool and sound black. And there was Hendrix, the ultimate in black cool. Everything he did was natural and perfect."

MourningStar
10-31-08, 11:10 AM
Ice T

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/LGiceT03.jpg

"Jimi’s music is definitely a motivating force for us black rock and roll musicians. He was at least 20 or 30 years ahead of his time. Nobody knows where his music would have been today. The stuff he did back then still sounds current."

MourningStar
10-31-08, 05:55 PM
Jack Casady

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/jack_casady.jpg

"His left and right-hand dynamics were fabulous. In his right hand, his vibrato, and his left hand, where he picked to get different overtones out of the guitar, was astounding. He would always be moving that around and you would always be taken to a different place, a little adventure on the guitar."

MourningStar
10-31-08, 11:08 PM
Bryan Ferry

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/Ferry.jpg

"Secretly, I wanted to look like Jimi Hendrix, but I could never quite pull it off."

MourningStar
11-01-08, 01:00 PM
David Crosby

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/DavidCrosby.jpg

"Jimi Hendrix could play better than our best guys and he did it while he was dancing, while being completely outrageous."

MourningStar
11-01-08, 08:37 PM
Steve Vai

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/steve_vai.jpg

"... you watch Jimi Hendrix literally reinvent the instrument. He was playing from somewhere else. He was really a kind of hybrid, and I can't even begin to imagine where he came from."

MourningStar
11-03-08, 06:55 PM
Little Richard

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/Little-Richard.jpg

"I regarded him as innovative, creative, and something of a stylist."

MourningStar
11-03-08, 11:16 PM
Carlos Santana

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/carlos_1.jpg

"Everyone was using tiny brushes and doing watercolors, while Jimi Hendrix was painting galactic scenes in Cinemascope."

MourningStar
11-05-08, 01:00 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/BuddyMiles_340.jpg

"Musicians and guitarists all over the world are still finding out so many new vivid ideas and imaginations of the man's playing; his gift and his contributions to the world of pop music."

Roland Stone
11-05-08, 11:28 PM
http://www.larrycoryell.net/e107_plugins/autogallery/Gallery/Jimi%20and%20Larry/Larry_&_Jimi_(1).jpg

Larry Coryell

We jammed together at a club called The Scene in New York City. I don't remember anything about it. But plenty of people told me what they thought about it - that he cut me. So what can I say about it? He's dead and I'm not. It's funny. He died in 1970 and nobody has ever reached the level of rock and roll playing that he did.

MourningStar
11-07-08, 12:06 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/RolandKirk.jpg

"They put Jimi Hendrix in a bag. They called him a pop artist. But Hendrix was a stoned blues player."

MourningStar
11-07-08, 11:45 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/JackBruce.jpg

"The first time he played in public in London was with us, The Cream, at London University. ... We walked over to the gig and he did sit in and played incredibly, with his teeth and everything, and really blew us all away."

Steev
11-08-08, 09:20 PM
"When he started to play, something changed; colors changed, everything changed."
Pete Townshend - on Jimi's Monterey performance

MourningStar
11-08-08, 10:05 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/P_Townshend.jpg

"Eric Clapton called me and suggested that we check him out. It was kind of keeping an eye on the competition. We arrived at the show a little late as I was stuck in the studio and, just as we arrived, Jeff Beck was walking out. I asked Jeff 'What's the matter mate? Is he that bad?' Beck could only roll his eyes upward and say 'No Pete, he's that good!' When Eric and I saw his show we knew what he meant. He was doing everything - the blues, rock, and things I still can't name. ... It was unbelievable."

MourningStar
11-08-08, 10:11 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/J_Beck.jpg

"We went down to Blaises and I heard this sound blasting up the road, and then went in there, and there was Jimi and I couldn't believe it. He was singing 'Like A Rolling Stone'. I knew the tune, but the way he treated it was something else. He was going crazy and the people were going crazy."

MourningStar
11-08-08, 10:17 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/R_Wood.jpg

"Jimi used to give me solos, at Staten Island and later at The Scene Club. He used to recognize my guitar playing through the bass ... but Jeff really hated me getting that recognition. I mean, here was Jimi, the world's greatest fucking guitarist, telling Jeff to shut the fuck up and let the bass player have a go."

MourningStar
11-10-08, 07:37 PM
http://i394.photobucket.com/albums/pp25/JimiFreak/PHOTO/Full59388.jpg

(at Monterey)
"I found myself onstage helping organize Jimi's soundcheck. Much to my surprise, he knew who I was, and was a fan of my work with Dylan. 'Hey Al', he said, ' we're gonna play 'Like A Rolling Stone'. Why don't you play organ with us?' I must have been clinically insane because I refused his offer."

MourningStar
11-11-08, 04:35 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/TedNugent-1.jpg

"Hendrix came walking in, pulled a blue Strat out of the case, plugged it into a Fuzz Face fuzzbox and a tuck and rolled Kustom amp, and all by himself started playing shit that was unbelievable. I was mesmerized."

MourningStar
11-11-08, 10:29 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/Eclespbf.jpg

"I couldn't believe how good Jimi Hendrix was. It was a really difficult thing for me to deal with, but I just had to surrender and say, 'This is fantastic.'"

MourningStar
11-15-08, 02:09 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/BuddyGuy79.jpg

"Jimi was just a real nice, quiet guy in person. But he put a certain fire into his music, something that you'll never quite be able to put your finger on. But it was there ..."

MourningStar
11-15-08, 10:09 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/summers.jpg

"I walked in and there he was on stage playing with Brian Auger. At the time it was amazing ... Yeah, it was intense and it was really great. It turned all the guitarists in London upside down at the time."

MourningStar
11-16-08, 01:07 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/Stills-Balboa.jpg

"Jimi blew me away so bad at Monterey that, through sheer force of personality I just bullied my way past all the security and sycophants to meet him."

MourningStar
11-18-08, 12:48 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/JW73.jpg

"... as I'd heard Jimi's first record I was in love with his band, so it was a natural thing for me to want to play with him."

Roland Stone
11-18-08, 11:05 PM
SCOTT ROSS (700 Club Christian Evangelist)
http://www.cbn.com/images/scottross_MD.jpg
He was a backup guitarist for my wife’s group, The Ronettes, for a period of time. The name he was using at that time was Jimi James. I also worked at a nightclub in New York called 'Ondine,' it was a disco, and Jimi would come in there and hang out. Dylan came in there too. It was a well-known club, small place, but it was an 'in' place for a while. And while I was involved with the club, Jimi would come in and play. Dylan would sit there and we’d talk. Hendrix was always quite a good guitar player, obviously, and he was a great performer. People would come to see him. I remember vividly the first time I’d seen him play. I think it was at the Ondine actually. A small, small club of a few hundred people, and he started playing something, picking some things with his teeth, on the guitar, I remember that. We talked, he was just around. I was also good friends with The Animals. One night, Chas Chandler who had been The Animals’ bass player went down to the village to hear Jimi play in the club and was completely blown away by what he saw and heard. I remember Chas coming back and talking to me about it. I wasn’t the only one he talked to, but he said to me that he had seen Hendrix, and I probably said, 'Who’s Hendrix?' because I was still thinking Jimi James and he was now using the Hendrix name.

Roland Stone
11-18-08, 11:53 PM
RANDY CALIFORNIA
http://www.bostream.nu/johanb/spirit/randy02.jpg

I didn't even know his last name was Hendrix! I always thought it was Jimmy James. When Barry Hansen (a.k.a. Dr. Demento - a Dj that now has a syndicated radio program that plays very obscure recordings) pulled out the "Are You Experienced" album, I said even though the photo is rather distorted, it sure looks like the guy I played with in New York. When I put it on the turntable and heard the actual playing -- I said, 'that's him... Jimmy James!'

MourningStar
11-19-08, 05:31 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/MarcBolan.jpg

"Everyone else used backing tracks, but he was going to play live because they got him on the show the same day. I was in the control room with the producer, just sitting about when he started 'Hey Joe', and this old lady really freaked out and said, 'Turn the backing trackdown!' because it was really loud. All the machines were shaking. And they said, 'But there is no backing track.'"

Roland Stone
11-19-08, 10:24 PM
BB KING
http://www.univibes.com/Images/BBKing_Yazid_Manou_pic.jpg

He was Jimi Hendrix! He didn't sound like anybody else but himself. He was like Charlie Parker in his way of playing, he played well, he was a person that made waves. When you heard Jimi Hendrix you knew it was Jimi Hendrix, he introduced himself in his instrument... You know, many radio stations play records and a lot of the times they don't call out the names who you just listened to, but when they play Jimi Hendrix, you don't have to tell me, [you know] it's Jimi Hendrix...

Roland Stone
11-19-08, 10:34 PM
ROGER WATERS

http://pubpages.unh.edu/~tra2/IMAGES/waters.jpg

"Two thirds of the way through their set, one of them (Cream) said, 'We'd like to invite a friend of ours from America out onstage.' It was Jimi Hendrix, and that was the first night he played in England.

"He came on and did all that now-famous stuff, like playing with his teeth. That ticket cost me about a pound or so. It might have been the best purchase I ever made."

Roland Stone
11-19-08, 10:49 PM
RICHIE HAVENS
http://www.messyoptics.com/bird/RichieH.jpg

I actually sent him to Greenwich Village to become Jimi Hendrix, in a way. He wasn't Jimi Hendrix when I met him. He was a guitarist for a band. I met him right after I made my first album. The whole incident was about him getting his own band and not having to get a job through the union to play for somebody else. That's what the gist of the conversation was about. I thought he could do his own thing, and sent him to the Cafe Wha! Three months later I was asked by a friend to go hear this great player down at the Cafe Wha! which turned out to be Jimmy James (a stage name for Jimi Hendrix) and the Blue Flames. So we were friends from the beginning.

MourningStar
11-21-08, 12:31 AM
http://i394.photobucket.com/albums/pp25/JimiFreak/PHOTO/jh02.jpg

"He played a couple of things on the guitar that I found interesting - the style - and it kind of sparked me off. I used to get a lot of demos from, like, Curtis Mayfield, early Impressions things. And Hendrix was the first person I'd ever seen who could actually play that Curtis Mayfield style, which was unusual. So I named a Jerry Butler song, or an Impressions thing, and he knew it and could play it, and I thought, 'Oh, interesting.' I mean, I'd never been around that area of music before."

MourningStar
11-23-08, 07:17 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/BM-MPF.jpg

"We met in Montreal (Spring-1964)... He had his hair in a pony-tail with long sideburns. Even though he was shy, I could tell this guy was different. He looked rather strange, because everybody was wearin' uniforms and he was eatin' his guitar, doin' flip-flops and wearin' chains. It was really strange, man but, oh boy, he made that band (The Isley Brothers)."

Roland Stone
11-24-08, 09:21 PM
NEIL YOUNG

http://cubanology.com/Top20RockGuitar/images/index.7.jpg

"He's just so free. He played loud - and he was real sensitive. He didn't ever play fast. It's easy to play if you can can figure out just what it was he was doing. He was so into it. All the little things, the little nuances - where he pulled his hand off and where he releases the note - it's not the notes he plays, it's the way he plays them. Of all the players I've ever heard it's gotta be Hendrix and J.J. Cale who are the best electric guitar players."

MourningStar
11-25-08, 11:44 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/vernonreid.jpg

"...Hendrix is a great original, he's a giant. He took blues, r & b, science-fiction and turned it into another world of music."

MourningStar
11-26-08, 12:29 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/MikeMcCready.jpg

"I'm in Nirvana when I hear Hendrix's 'Machine Gun.'"

"I fuckin' love Hendrix. He's all-encompassing. His songwriting ability was amazing, his leads were genius -- he was so far ahead of his time.

My dad was in Vietnam, and he had Hendrix's Band of Gypsys record on his carrier. He brought that back when I was seven or eight, and I put it on not really knowing that much about rock & roll. I remember going, "What the hell is this?" I was pretty young, and it was so otherworldly. When I started understanding guitar more, I realized that Hendrix was so far above the level that a lot of other guitar players were at.

There's a feeling you get sometimes playing leads -- it's like you're out of your mind, you're in a state of nirvana. It sounds silly, but it's spiritual. I get that when I hear "Machine Gun" and he's playing that one fucking note and it brings you to tears. I'm constantly striving for that kind of feeling, a feeling that will bring across an emotion to an audience or to myself."

Roland Stone
11-26-08, 01:48 AM
DAVID GILMOUR

http://www.zumablog.com/images/120/Davidgilmore.jpg?0.354638103631731

"The guitarist I most admire is Jimi Hendrix. For a long time, I listened to myself and thought, ‘My playing isn’t as good as Hendrix.’ Or, ‘I’m not singing as well as Paul McCartney.’ But there was quite a sudden moment when I started liking my own voice and guitar playing, and that’s when the style develops.”

Herman Cherusken
11-26-08, 10:17 AM
http://i365.photobucket.com/albums/oo91/Demi-urge/Jaco007II.gif

'All I gotta say is.... "Third Stone From the Sun". And for anyone who doesn't know about that by now, they should've checked Jimi out a lot earlier.'

Roland Stone
11-26-08, 10:22 AM
http://www.urbanimage.tv/watermarked/robintrower_bj.jpg

ROBIN TROWER

There is guitar playing before Hendrix and there’s guitar playing after Hendrix, you know? [Laughs] He’s a giant, a genius. I think we all live in his shadow, even today. I still think he was the greatest rock 'n' roll guitar player ever.

MourningStar
11-26-08, 12:30 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/JUBL__000120b_1000.jpg

"...the night I saw Jimi was the night I decided to become a professional musician. ...it was just completely mesmerising and overwhelming and inspiring. And I've been just hooked ever since. - ... when I saw Jimi Hendrix I just was possessed. I realised, 'Oh my God, this is what I want to do. It's going to be my career.'"

Roland Stone
11-26-08, 08:40 PM
http://www.nemsworld.com/beatles/67pp/sp10.jpg


Do you have any favorite guitar parts that you played with the Beatles?

I liked "Taxman" just because of what it was. I was very inspired by Jimi Hendrix. It was really my first voyage into feedback. George was generally a bit more restrained with his playing. He wasn't really into heavy feedback . . . with "Taxman" I got the guitar and was playing around in the studio with feedback and stuff and I said to George "Maybe you could play it like this" I don't remember how it happened that I played it, but it was probably "Why don't you do it then?" rather than spending the time to get the idea over. And I don't think George was too miffed. But when people say, "Great solo on 'Taxman'," I don't think he's too pleased to have to say, "Well, that was Paul, actually."

I'm very fussy about guitar players. I go back too far to be satisfied easily. I knew Jimi when he was playing in London, and I was a major, major fan. In fact, he still is my favorite guitar player-just through his whole attitude and his playing. I mean, I like attitude, but it's no good unless you can play. And in fact, some of the attitude kinds of things, like picking with his teeth, Jimi didn't really want to do. It was just show, and he got fed up with that very quickly because he was a real proper guitar player. He played lovely acoustic, too. He was the first guy to really wind it up, to get into heavy feedback. I caught his first gig in London, and I used to follow him around London like a fan. It's a very small area, and people would ring me up and say that Jimi's playing at Blazes tonight, or at the Bag O' Nails. And I was there.

One of my greatest memories was that we released Sgt. Pepper's on Friday night, and on Sunday night Jimi was playing at the Savile Theatre, which Brian Epstein used to run, just for something to do on a Sunday night. There was never any entertainment on for Sunday night, so Brian began to book people in, like Chuck Berry and Fats Domino. And we could go into a little special box, and not be bothered, and we could watch all these great acts. So Jimi came on, and he opened up with Sgt. Pepper's, which had only been released on Friday. That was a great, great memory. Since then, I've seen people like Clapton, who I admire a lot, and David Gilmour. But I still like Hendrix the best.

Ayler
11-27-08, 01:52 PM
Do you have any favorite guitar parts that you played with the Beatles?

I liked "Taxman" just because of what it was. I was very inspired by Jimi Hendrix. Strange answer as it was recorded BEFORE Jimi was in London !

MourningStar
11-27-08, 02:19 PM
Strange answer as it was recorded BEFORE Jimi was in London !Not so strange if it's a recent quote. After all, the man is facing 70.

MourningStar
11-28-08, 01:10 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/Neil_Young.jpg

"Guitar -- you can play it or transcend it. Jimi showed me that. He was at one with his instrument. I just looked at it, heard it, and felt it and wanted to do it. Hendrix threw a Molotov cocktail onto rock & roll."

Roland Stone
11-28-08, 01:32 AM
Not so strange if it's a recent quote. After all, the man is facing 70.

The quote is from Guitar Player 1990. I edited out some stuff about John Mayall that was mixed up in there too.

Also I had messed up the quote a bit with regard to George's reaction. Now it reads correctly. But even if Paul was mistaken, the part about Hendrix inspiring Taxman remains. I never even knew it was Paul's solo!

MourningStar
11-28-08, 11:47 AM
Thnx for clearing that up. Great quote, btw!

Steev
11-28-08, 12:29 PM
[Please] Don't get me started on Beatles . . .

The part about Hendrix inspiring Taxman remains. I never even knew it was Paul's solo!

Wow - Common knowledge for decades :)

I'll check this one in a minute [failing memory] but I think he also did the one in Good Morning Good Morning.
But my Favorite Beatles guitar moment of all time [Next to And Your Bird Can Sing & Blackbird (also McCartney solo) ] was
the Out bit after "Are You Gonna Be in My Dreams Tonight" and then Ringo's solo on Side 2 of Abbey Road:
The Guitar leads on "The End" are ALL 3 Beatles doing guitar trade-offs
Starting with McCartney - Then Harrison - Then Lennon and it starts all over again - times 3.
A moment of utter disbelief for me since the 1st time I ever heard it.
It's so easy to see what Hendrix saw in them . . .
Peace :) :) :)

Roland Stone
11-28-08, 12:58 PM
By the way - does anyone have the Brian Epstein tape where he talks up Jimi? I've got it somewhere on cassette but it would nice to see it uploaded here someday.

MourningStar
11-28-08, 01:34 PM
By the way - does anyone have the Brian Epstein tape where he talks up Jimi? I've got it somewhere on cassette but it would nice to see it uploaded here someday.FIND IT & UPLOAD IT!

... or Steev and I will have you for breakfast!

(as for Beatles - Helter Skelter, Fab-4 at their heaviest, 'nuff said - end of Off-Topic)

Steev
11-28-08, 01:36 PM
Off Topic:
Roland - Wasn't it you who was working on that Alternate Electric Ladyland?
Did you ever find the missing toonz U were looking for?
Is it still in the "works"? Did U let it go?
Just wondering . . .
Peace :)

Steev
11-28-08, 01:40 PM
FIND IT & UPLOAD IT!

... or Steev and I will have you for breakfast!

(as for Beatles - Helter Skelter, Fab-4 at their heaviest, 'nuff said - end of Off-Topic)

Thanx Marcos - Took the words right out of my mouth ! !
Gotta roll :) :) :)
Peace

siamesecat
11-28-08, 01:59 PM
You`re wrong, boys, Jimi inspired "Tomorrow Never Knows", while haunt british studios before his actual appearance.

Wonder, where Keith & Mick quotes is? Boys invented "psychedelic" in Goin`Home from Aftermath just before Revelation. Or it was Brian for Hendrix relations only? Jimi played "Satis" in early days and cite it later occasionally. So where is Glimmer twins?

MourningStar
11-28-08, 05:03 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/mick62.jpg

"He was just amazing ... I just thought Jimi was a great guitar player, I thought he was the best and the most original."

siamesecat
11-28-08, 05:49 PM
Thanks, but... is it all, that he can say?! Somewhat elusive. And Keith?

MourningStar
11-28-08, 09:56 PM
Thanks, but... is it all, that he can say?! Somewhat elusive. And Keith?Yo S-Cat! (man, there's no satisfying some people!) - Look kid, I can't do it all. Don't be so lazy, I'm sure you are as capable of surfing the web as anyone else. Do some homework and make yourself useful kitty-cat! Keith is all yours.

MourningStar
11-30-08, 04:16 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/StevieRayVaughan.jpg

"What it really is is that there's only one Jimi Hendrix. There won't never be another one. I just do my best to do what I can to carry his music on."

MourningStar
11-30-08, 05:05 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/John_Frusciante.jpg

"I felt that with Jimi Hendrix, I feel that his life, his lifestyle and the women in his life affected his music moreso than other musicians did. You know, because that's how free his playing sounds like. When you hear Jimi Hendrix play it's a pure expression of him as a person. You see him on stage and there's absolutely no separation between him and his guitar, they're completely one because he's just putting every single bit of everything in his whole psyche and every single part of his body into his guitar playing. - You really heard how he felt in his playing. When he was feeling cosmic and when he was feeling good and peaceful he played just the most beautiful things ever. And when he was feeling angry he just played the dirtiest, grittiest, meanest, hard things you ever heard in your life."

MourningStar
11-30-08, 05:54 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/JeffBeck.jpg

"I was sick when I saw him, I can tell you that. Yeah, I mean, who wasn't? It was like, 'What the hell am I going to do tomorrow?', you know? 'Get a job at the post office, I think', yeah. It was hopeless because everybody, everybody you talked to, you know, was, 'Hey! Have you heard Jimi Hendrix?' I says, 'yeah, ...thank you'.

Roland Stone
11-30-08, 08:07 PM
Off Topic:
Roland - Wasn't it you who was working on that Alternate Electric Ladyland?
Did you ever find the missing toonz U were looking for?
Is it still in the "works"? Did U let it go?
Just wondering . . .
Peace :)

Yes that was me and I am making progress. BOTML was a bit of a bump in the road, but thanks to a recent upload here: Wereldberoemd Radio6NL (Track #4, thanks Johanincr!), I've got that one covered nicely now. Still trying to find a noticeably different studio take of AATW.

Steev
12-03-08, 03:18 PM
"One of the wrongs I did in my life," Ike Turner once declared, "was that I fired this guy because he was too slow with them pedals [screaming trees], and come to find out ten or twelve years later it was Jimi Hendrix. You can't win 'em all . . . . ."

MourningStar
12-05-08, 02:07 PM
Ike Turner
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/Ike.gif

"One of the wrongs I did in my life," Ike Turner once declared, "was that I fired this guy because he was too slow with them pedals [screaming trees], and come to find out ten or twelve years later it was Jimi Hendrix. You can't win 'em all . . . . ."Yup! Nice one Steev.

MourningStar
12-05-08, 02:11 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/ROLLINS.jpg

"He's playing beyond a man with an instrument. It's just him coming through the amps. He's the first guy who actually welded himself to the instrument, physically!"

Steev
12-05-08, 04:06 PM
Marcos - Great 'Elder' Ike :)

Go Henry! You're not off by much, my man ! ! :D

Roland Stone
12-05-08, 04:43 PM
Yup! Nice one Steev.

I saw that Ike Turner interview online too. But I didn't quote it because I don't quite believe its true. As I recall Turner is saying that Jimi hung out in Ike's home studio (was it in Kansas City?). Something about that story
just didn't smell right. All I know for sure is that when Ike Turner opened for Jimi at the Newport Pop Festival Friday night, you could see that Ike had a chip on his shoulder and was playing guitar as if he was out to prove that he was a badass guitarslinger long before this upstart came along. Ike wore a headband too and was copping all of Jimi's flash moves. Maybe that had something to do with the fact that Jimi was in a sour mood for that show.

So much of Jimi's earliest days are shrouded in purple haze! Conflicting stories abound. Some of the myths encouraged by Jimi himself including whether or not he was ever a member of the Ike & Tina Turner revue.


Tina Turner says he wasn't: "If Jimi Hendrix was in my band, I would have known it!"

MourningStar
12-05-08, 06:59 PM
I saw that Ike Turner interview online too. But I didn't quote it because I don't quite believe its true. ... Tina Turner says he wasn't: "If Jimi Hendrix was in my band, I would have known it!"Perhaps Ike fired Jimi before he got a chance to gig, like during an audition/rehearsal. Anything's possible!

I was at Newport, Jimi knew the score. I really doubt Ike had any effect.

MourningStar
12-05-08, 10:24 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/Spencer_Davis.jpg

"One night Jimi was sitting on the sofa, just jamming with a bunch of friends, and I was intrigued by a chord he was playing. I liked the way it sounded but I couldn't figure out how he was doing it because, of course, he was left-handed. Eventually I got him to show me how to do it, and that was the chord I play at the start of 'I'm A Man'."

Roland Stone
12-06-08, 08:43 PM
". . . and that was the chord I play at the start of 'I'm A Man'."

Cool! I thought of it as a Hendrix chord before but I hear it now!

MourningStar
12-07-08, 07:21 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/JW.jpg

"I think he would have definitely done better things. I've never seen anybody who loved to play more than him and he always had some kind of an idea. I don't know whether it would have been in a commercial way or he might have come up with something very strange but he was always up with new ideas. I think if he had lived he would have stayed as great as he always was."

Roland Stone
12-07-08, 08:43 PM
ANDY CAHAN (keyboardist for The Turtles"

http://rombox.com/andy/doctor/Andy.photo.GIF

One morning [Graham Bond] told me to pick him up in my VW bus and to bring my Baldwin electric harpsichord, (that I had hooked up through a Hammond leslie), pretty cool for that time! There I was at "TTG" studios on Highland Ave. and Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood California November 1968, setting up my Baldwin, while Jack Casady of the Jefferson Airplane was setting up his bass, Lowell George of Little Feet was warming up on flute, Graham, turning on the Hammond B3 and Mitch Mitchell setting up the drums. Noel Redding was in the control room with the engineer. My back was to the studio door. Then I felt something behind me... I looked over my shoulder... there was Jimi Hendrix, accompanied by two gorgeous blonds, one carrying his amp. and the other his guitar. He sat down, plugged in and proceeded to play the blues in the key of A. His veins were popping out of his neck as he squealed the high notes out of his Fender's Fender. It was totally awesome! The jam lasted two hours.
As we all finished gloating, listing to the playback, Hendrix, myself and some guy, I think he was a studio tech., stood in the corner, smoking a joint and pretended we were instruments. I was the drums, making "ka doom doom bop" noises with my mouth, Hendrix was... you guessed it, lead guitar with his mouth, and the guy was bass. I still don't know what happened to that tape. It's out there somewhere... anyone know where it is?

MourningStar
12-07-08, 11:32 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/BernardPurdie.jpg

"On a lot of songs that Jimmy didn't know, the bass player had to whisper the chords to him. But I never in all my life saw anybody pick up songs as fast as Jimmy did that night. In a couple of days he knew everything, so he didn't have any problem."

Roland Stone
12-09-08, 10:27 PM
"I never in all my life saw anybody pick up songs as fast as Jimmy did that night."

WHAT NIGHT IS HE TALKING ABOUT?

Roland Stone
12-09-08, 10:38 PM
JORMA KAUKONEN
http://muslib.ru/groupe/2225/artist.jpg

"Hendrix is a superlative musician but I really liked Clapton's crisper kind of style better."

Roland Stone
12-09-08, 11:06 PM
ELVIN BISHOP

http://sloblogs.thetribunenews.com/sidetracked/files/2008/05/bishop.jpg

“Bloomfield went on a break,” Bishop said, “and he came back and said, ‘You’ve got to hear this guy over here. He sounds like cars crashing into trains and stuff.’ And we went over and saw him and, boy, was he a mind blower.”

Roland Stone
12-09-08, 11:13 PM
JOHN McLAUGHLIN
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/40/84267669_c8cafd812f.jpg?v=0
"He shifted the whole course of guitar playing, single-handedly, in my opinion. Of course, there are now a lot of variations on that, but he did it with such grace, and with finesse, and with real passion. I can't ask for any more than that."

MourningStar
12-09-08, 11:14 PM
"I never in all my life saw anybody pick up songs as fast as Jimmy did that night."

WHAT NIGHT IS HE TALKING ABOUT?I'm guessing 'that night' would be the first time Jimi played with Bernard Purdie (Jan. 1966 according to J. Black).

MourningStar
12-12-08, 12:29 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/E_Isley.jpg

"He could play wonderfully without an amp. He would play in the hallway of our house while we were in the dining room. With his back to us, no amplifier, the sound and the feeling emanating from him was quite something."

MourningStar
12-19-08, 12:35 AM
... played by Catherine Bell
from the Ghosts Of Christmas Past episode of JAG
(dedicated to Bob Hope & The USO)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/gocp4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/bell-1.jpg

"Nobody played the guitar like Hendrix."

Unfortunately, no one on the production staff caught
the obvious error in the script for the actress's line. The
episode was a flashback to Christmas Eve 1969!

MourningStar
12-25-08, 05:44 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/TBwBBA.jpg

"Mitch and Noel didn't like to do the soundchecks. Carmine and I did. We did hundreds of soundchecks with Jimi, literally. The best one would have been at Red Rocks. I walked into the dressing room and Jimi had some things there which we did., and we all went out on stage and we played for quite some time. It was incredible. I got to play through 11 Sunn cabinets that Noel had set up at the time. It was one of the loudest things I'd ever heard. I thought it was bitchin'."

Roland Stone
12-30-08, 09:03 PM
http://media.npr.org/programs/atc/features/2008/july/janisian/janis540.jpg

JANIS IAN

I loved Jimi. To him I was always "That girl who wrote that song, man, you know?" A lot has been written about his life and his death but not enough about his grace. He was beautifully graceful both as a musician and as a man. I used to love watching his hands long and slender; the perfect player's fingers. I envied him that.

We'd spend entire nights at the Cafe Au Go-Go jamming. The club had a Hammond B3 I played incompetently. But I could set up a pattern while Jimi would fall into a reverie playing his ass off for the winos who'd help us close the bar at 3am.

Jimi introduced me to B.B. King's music and we made it a point to go see him together whenever possible. On April 4, B.B. was at the Generation Club opening for Big Brother & The Holding Company so it was "old home week" before the show. Jimi had finished his own gig early and came to watch B.B.'s set with me. He was pretty pleased because he had bought the club intending to turn it into a studio. The place was only half full . . . We stood against a wall . . . at some point during the show a man walked on stage and handed B.B. a note. B.B. read it, looked down at the floor and then announced that Martin Luther King, Jr. was now officially declared dead."

MourningStar
01-28-09, 09:42 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/RK.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/RK2.jpg

"I loved his vocals, you know? I thought he was probably the best I’d ever seen at singing and playing guitar at the same time. It’s like he could divide his mind into two places at once. He didn’t even have to think about what his guitar hands were doing while he was singing. That really amazed me."

MourningStar
02-01-09, 12:07 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/santana_maracas_v2.jpg

"Jimi didn't just play like that because he could strangle a Stratocaster or a Marshall, he played like that because he saw it a certain way and he took certain things that made his spirit be stronger upon his playing. Otherwise, anyone could do it -"

susep73
02-01-09, 08:31 PM
http://www.geosound.org/finnishedgeo33/cream-konserthuest-11-14-67.jpg

21Dec.66 - "After Pete Townshend and I went to see him play, I thought that was it, that the game was up for all of us-we may as well just pack it in. He could do it all. He was like Pete and I combined and much, much more."

MourningStar
02-03-09, 06:35 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/winwood.jpg

"We recorded 'Voodoo Chile' down in the Village and out in the corridor were all of these musicians, waiting to be given their chance. Guys like Larry Coryell were out there, hoping to play something. Jimi came out and said 'Hi! Come in.' There were no chord sheets, no nothing. He just started playing. It was a one-take job, with him singing and playing at the same time. He just had such mastery of the instrument and he knew what he was and knew his abilities. That's why everybody says he was a humble, polite person, because he just knew what he could do and he didn't think he was better than he was."

MourningStar
02-03-09, 11:15 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/syd.jpg

"Hendrix was a perfect guitarist, and that's all I wanted to do as a kid, play guitar properly and jump around."

stplsd
04-15-09, 06:35 PM
RECORD MIRROR
Ginger Baker interview by Norman Joplin: [How would you compare Clapton & Hendrix]?
GB: I don’t just think Eric’s better than Jimi – I think he’s in a different class altogether. Jimi is first of all a showman [rather] than a musician. But Eric is a musician first.

stplsd
04-17-09, 10:51 AM
CIRCUS magazine April 1975: I'd like to know what you think about these people: Jimi Hendrix, Liza Minnelli, Led Zeppelin...

Freddie Mercury: Jimi Hendrix is very important. He's my idol. He sort of epitomizes, from his presentation onstage, the whole works of a rock star. There's no way you can compare him. You either have the magic or you don't. There's no way you can work up to it. There's nobody who can take his place.

MourningStar
04-25-09, 02:14 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/tom2bw.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/LHPDeanStreet.jpg

"You knew there was something about that guy. He would
walk down Bleeker Street with his guitar over his shoulder
like a lumberjack"

MourningStar
04-25-09, 02:31 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/2394747889_bfe380f3ba.jpg

"I was sitting near the back of the Cheetah when I noticed
a guitarist in the back line of Curtis Knight's band whose playing
mesmerized me."

MourningStar
04-25-09, 02:52 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/RaviShankar400w.jpg

"I liked the music of Jimi Hendrix, but when he started being
obscene with his guitar and started burning it, I felt sad. In our
culture, the instrument is something which we respect. What he
did was like sacrilege to me."

purple jim
04-25-09, 04:26 PM
Aw, come on Ravi, smash up yer sitar for us. Just once.

MourningStar
05-14-09, 09:48 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/GibsonCEO.gif

"Jimi Hendrix fundamentally pioneered the outstanding possibilities of the electric guitar."

purplehazechild
05-17-09, 07:05 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5ZQfI7oKnY

John Frusciante in Red Hot Chili Peppers getting interviewed about Jimi Hendrix

stplsd
05-17-09, 08:58 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/GibsonCEO.gif

"Jimi Hendrix fundamentally pioneered the outstanding possibilities of the electric guitar."

Yeah, well he would say that coz his marketing thought that would sell a few! ha-ha-ha

MourningStar
08-06-09, 07:49 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/TC.jpg

"I did play with Jimi one night at a club called The Speakeasy in London, England in 1967, and it was my most profound musical experience ever."

MourningStar
08-08-09, 11:32 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/MickJagger_.jpg

“I loved Jimi Hendrix from the beginning. The moment I saw him. I thought he was fantastic. I was an instant convert. Mr. Jimi Hendrix is the best thing I’ve ever seen. It was exciting, sexy, interesting. I first saw him at the at the Revolution Club in London ... I couldn’t believe it. It was insane, so good ..."

MourningStar
08-19-09, 08:43 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/gene.gif

"At our first show with him, he had a Marshall stack. I had never seen one of those before. I had a little cassette recorder and put it near his amp. It blew up. I sat next to his amp and listened to the whole thing. It was like something I had never heard before."

MourningStar
08-19-09, 09:00 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/nez.jpg

"So that night, I stood in front of the stage and listened to Hendrix at sound check. And I thought, 'Well, this guy's from Mars; he's from some other planet, but whatever it is, thank heaven for this visitation.' And I listened to him play the sound checks and the concert. I thought, "This is some of the best music I've heard in my life."

MourningStar
08-19-09, 09:37 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/dylan-bob.jpg

"When i first heard Jimi, he was basically a blues player but unlike-everybody else outside of the old-authentic guys, he was young & he was the real thing."

stplsd
11-01-09, 07:00 AM
Pre-Rolling Stone magazine interview, February 1967, when <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" /><st1:City><st1:place>Bloomfield</st1:place></st1:City> was still with the Electric Flag, published RS April 68.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>
Jan Wenner: "You just played on the same show [<st1:City><st1:place>Monterey</st1:place></st1:City>] with Jimi Hendrix— what do you think?"<o:p></o:p>
Mike "Groovy" Bloomfield: "Great. Monstrous. Really talented cat, super together cat. Now here is a young cat, extremely talented. For years, all the Negroes who'd make it into the white market made it through servility, like Fats Domino, a lovable, jolly, fat image, or they had been spades who had been picked up by the white market. Now here's this cat you know—"I am a super spade man. I am like black and tough. And I will fuck you and rape you and do you in, and I'm bad assed and weird." Not only that, I mean that's his image which he sets forward about as well as any­one can. I mean there's no mistak­ing what's happening. He plays his ass off; he writes cool songs; he's got a good group. His few albums are some of the best albums ever recorded in the world. How often do you ever see someone really to­gether in image and in head? In everything it's all there, out front. The music fits in with the person, the person fits in with the music and all is one."<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>
<o:p>How about some dates, sources, guys? I mean you could just be misquoting/garbling something you've heard from somebody's cousin who heard it from somewhere? Not suggesting you are, but? It might be nice for us to be able to put it in context, check it out and see the photos or the rest of the articles, etc. no?

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</o:p>

thefrenchowl
11-01-09, 02:48 PM
stplsd: Pre-Rolling Stone magazine interview, February 1967, when <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:p</st1:City>was still with the Electric Flag, published RS April 67 Jan Wenner: "You just played on the same show [<st1:City>Monterey]</ST1:p </st1:City>with Jimi Hendrix— what do you think?"<O:p


I always though early RS had insight, but that much???

Patrick

stplsd
11-01-09, 05:19 PM
I always though early RS had insight, but that much???

Patrick
Thanks for spotting my typo

MourningStar
11-01-09, 10:45 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/MattBellamy.jpg

“I first got really excited by guitars when I was about 12. At the time, I wasn’t really into heavy music at all. I was into the sort of stuff my dad plays – Dick Dale-type stuff. But then I saw a video of Jimi Hendrix performing his famous 1967 Monterey Pop Festival set. More than the songs, what changed my life was the freedom, the expression that he brought to the performance. There was a sense of reckless danger, capped when he famously smashed his guitar at the end, then set it on fire. After that I started trying to bring that to my guitar playing. To me, Hendrix is not necessarily about melodies or chords; it’s about the energy he brings to it, the way that his whole psychedelic, crazy, slightly drugged-up personality bleeds through into what he’s playing. He’s got so much mastery of his instrument that you forget he’s playing an instrument at all. He was a pioneer in using the studio itself as an instrument – wringing out unusual sounds until the environment was another extension of his own creativity. We actually worked in Electric Ladyland Studios for part of ‘Black Holes and Revelations’. The design of the place is really unusual; they haven’t changed it since Hendrix built it, but it still seems very futuristic. It was interesting because people think of Hendrix as someone quite bluesy, they don’t really think of outer space. He was one of the first guys to build his own studio, partly because the bills from his previous album had been so astronomical on account of his intense perfectionism; ‘Gypsy Eyes’, for instance, was re-recorded 43 times. I can relate to that sort of perfectionism. I can’t imagine what sorts of impossible sounds he’d be capable of ringing out of a modern studio set-up.”

stplsd
11-02-09, 08:02 AM
ROLLING STONE 11 May 1968<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>
[...]“What do you think about Jimi Hendrix?<o:p></o:p>
Eric Clapton: “I don't really want to be critical about it. I think Jimi can sing very well; he just puts it around that he can't sing and everyone accepts it. I think he can sing very well. I also think he's a great guitarist. I don't like to watch him too much 'cause I prefer to listen to him.<o:p></o:p>
When he first came to <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" /><st1:country-region><st1:place>England</st1:place></st1:country-region>, you know English people have a very big thing towards a spade. They really love that magic thing, the sex­ual thing. They all fall for that sort of thing. Everybody and his brother in <st1:country-region><st1:place>England</st1:place></st1:country-region> still sort of think that spades have big dicks. And Jimi came over and exploited that to the limit, the fucking tee. Everybody fell for it Shit, I fell for it After a while I began to suspect it. Having gotten to know him, I found out that's not where he's at, not where he's at at all. That stuff he does on stage, when he does that he's testing the audience. He'll do a lot of things, like fool around with his tongue and play his guitar behind his back and rub it up and down his crotch. And he'll look at the audience, and if they're digging it, he won't like the audience. He'll keep on doing it putting them on. Play less music. If they don't dig it, then he'll play straight 'cause he knows he has to. It's funny. I heard that here he came on and put on all that shit in his first set and people were just dead towards it. And in his second set he just played, which is great.<o:p></o:p>
He had the whole combination in <st1:country-region><st1:place>England</st1:place></st1:country-region>. It was just what the mar­ket wanted, a psychedelic pop star who looked freaky, and they're also still hung up about spades and the blues thing was there. So Jimi walked in, put on all the gear, and made it straight away. It was a per­fect formula. Underneath it all, he's got an incredible musical talent He is really one of the finest musicians around on the Western scene. If you just scrape away all the bullshit he carries around you'll find a fantas­tically talented guy and a beautiful guitar player for his age. I just can't take it all, all the plastic things.<o:p></o:p>
Who started the hair thing?<o:p></o:p>
I guess Dylan started it. It's fun­ny, 'cause it's gone into a fashion­able thing in <st1:country-region><st1:place>England</st1:place></st1:country-region>. I did it 'cause I liked Dylan's hair. I went and had my hair curled. Then Jimmy came on with curly hair, and his band did it to complete the image, and every­body else did it 'cause they dug Jimmy and other people did it 'cause they dug me, I guess. It became quite a trend in <st1:country-region><st1:place>England</st1:place></st1:country-region> to have curly hair.” […]<o:p></o:p>

purple jim
11-02-09, 11:41 AM
I was pretty sure that Eric's afro came after Jimi's arrival on the London scene.

buffalorattle
11-02-09, 12:41 PM
I was pretty sure that Eric's afro came after Jimi's arrival on the London scene.
You are correct purple jim, Clapton had straight hair on Jimi's arrival, But by Feb/March 67 he looked like this Coincedence ? I think not>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SObv1nsQB38
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SObv1nsQB38)

backfromthestorm
11-02-09, 01:25 PM
You are correct purple jim, Clapton had straight hair on Jimi's arrival, But by Feb/March 67 he looked like this Coincedence ? I think not>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SObv1nsQB38
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SObv1nsQB38)


Claptons seems to being telling a little lie...Can he not admit he was inspired by Jimi`s freaky ways?

Clapton wrote somewhere (autobiography i think) that he didnt like Bob Dylan... UNTIL, Hendrix played Like A Rolling Stone.. and the way Jimi played it made him really understand what the song was about.. then he got into him. So would you fix ya hair like someone you dont even like? Weird how he didnt say he just liked Jimi`s hair.

stplsd
11-02-09, 03:38 PM
Of course, Jimi did himself self conciously copy Dylan's hair and was photographed backstage at the Wha? with this hair before he left for London. I would contend that the "Afro" style was possibly African-Americans copying Hendrix' (Dylan) styled hair unknowingly. Are there any references to Afro hair do's in New York prior to Jimi appearing in US magazines from mid 1967 onwards?

backfromthestorm
11-02-09, 03:47 PM
Of course, Jimi did himself self conciously copy Dylan's hair and was photographed backstage at the Wha? with this hair before he left for London. I would contend that the "Afro" style was possibly African-Americans copying Hendrix' (Dylan) styled hair unknowingly. Are there any references to Afro hair do's in New York prior to Jimi appearing in US magazines from mid 1967 onwards?

Well I know Jimi copied Dylans hair, so I guess indirectly its linked to Dylan, but I`m sure Eric wouldnt of done it if it werent for Jimi. Ummm now thats confusing.. Quite a big contention that the entire African American `Fro` is down to Jimi`s doing though. I`m out on that one. Maybe though! I`ll wikipidia the `Afro` and see who started it. lol..

Just did - Apparently its been around since the 1860`s. I heard Jimi say he wrote `All Along The Watchtower` and many other hits around then though so ya could still be right! :)

purple jim
11-02-09, 04:46 PM
Jimi (and soon after Sly) certainly influenced black fashion and "afro" hair styling. Look at the Jackson 5 in the early 70's, all jumping around in multicoloured costumes and afros like a bunch of Hendrix clones.

http://www.noob.fr/upload/7045c_jacks.jpg (http://www.noob.fr)

Billy Preston had a doozie also!

http://www.noob.fr/upload/3413e_billy.jpg (http://www.noob.fr)

stplsd
11-03-09, 05:52 PM
Quite a big contention that the entire African American `Fro` is down to Jimi`s doing though.
No bigger a deal than saying that all the white hipsters copied it from him, it's only a fashion after all;-).


I`m out on that one. Maybe though! I`ll wikipidia the `Afro` and see who started it. lol..
Just did - Apparently its been around since the 1860`s. .
Very interesting, but the Wiki article is about a particular group of caucasian women, in 1860 they grew their hair long and wild as a marketing ploy for a freak show where they were exhibited as 'Circassian' beauties, that was it, really.
60's reality - check out all the hair do's of African-American hipsters/musicians pre-Jimi - to a man/woman all processed/heavily styled or cut short. Post Jimi US fame - "Afro's" everywhere


I heard Jimi say he wrote `All Along The Watchtower` and many other hits around then :)
Please show source for this. I know he liked to talk/write as if he was a time traveller, but I've never heard this contention/quote? before.

stplsd
11-03-09, 06:02 PM
Rolling Stone 28-9-68 (Page 30) ‘The Blues Are The Truth: A Profile Of Buddy Guy’ by Barry Gifford: […] He enjoys Clapton, Bloomfield, Bishop and some of the other young white blues guitarists, but "the best young player I've seen yet," he claims, "is a 12-year-old kid in Phila­delphia who came up to my hotel room and laid down all of Jimi Hendrix's moves faster than Hendrix himself." […] [A tad jealous of Jimi were we? see also- Elmore James' "The 12 Year Old Boy" ]<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>

stplsd
11-21-09, 02:43 PM
Buddy Miles: [paraphrased by David Henderson around 1978 from an interview discussing when he first met Jimi in 1965 at the 'Uptown Club' <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" /><st1:City><st1:place>Montreal</st1:place></st1:City> where he gave him methedrine (speed)] "[One day he turned me on. He called it "crystals" But out of his bag he produced a baby bottle with nipple, cap and all. Thinking the white substance inside was milk, I was really taken aback when Jimi undid the cap and poured out some of the contents: sparkling white powder. I cracked up.]"

Mike Quashie [talking about meeting Jimi in New York in 1965 to Jerry Hopkins around 1983]: "[I gave him a lot of his ideas about Voodoo and fire, as well as introducing him to the idea of tying colorful "calypso" scarfs around his biceps, thighs and head.]
"I was workin' the African Room, across the street from the Lennox Hotel where Jimmy was stayin'. He was goin' by the name of Jimmy James and came into the club all the time. I teased him about his vaselined hair. It was long, but he was wearin' it greased, and I’d say, 'Wha' fo', baby? You tryin' to be Nat King Cole? Wooooooo! Wha' kine nigger are you! Anyways.'
"At the time I didn't know his real name, I only knew him as Jimmy or J.J. Sometimes I called him J.C., for Jimmy Coon. He'd come in, see my show, and I'd go see him in his hotel room, usually to buy some speed. I was into speed a long time and I give Jimmy ten, twenty dollars lots of time."

Ezy Rider
04-29-10, 03:38 AM
Here is an interview with Dave Mason on television talking a bit about Jimi at about 5 min.

http://cbs2chicago.com/video/?id=69424@wbbm.dayport.com

He looks like a great and nice guy.

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Ezy Rider
04-29-10, 03:39 AM
And here is something Al Kooper said on Jimi

http://blogs.citypages.com/gimmenois...lks.php?page=3 (http://blogs.citypages.com/gimmenoise/2010/04/al_kooper_talks.php?page=3)


CP: Jimi Hendrix.

Kooper: An amazing musician, and a very sweet guy. He lived about a block away from me for quite a while in New York. We saw a lot of each other. He gave me a guitar when I played on one of his albums. I turned it down, then he had it sent to my house. So that was pretty wild. We just had a lotta good times together. I miss him.


http://blogs.citypages.com/gimmenoise/alkooperjimihendrix.jpeg

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MourningStar
06-15-10, 06:25 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/JBeck.jpg

"'Stone Free' has got bits of Buddy Guy; it sounds like Les Paul in places. Jimi does every trick in the book and nails it all together so tight that you can't even see the joints."

stplsd
06-15-10, 06:47 PM
I was pretty sure that Eric's afro came after Jimi's arrival on the London scene.

Everybody's "Afro" came after Bob Dylan;-)

MourningStar
06-15-10, 10:08 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/NRedding.jpg

"I'll switch to bass. I don't see anybody else playing lead guitar with this bloke."

MourningStar
06-15-10, 11:27 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/LWest.jpg

"It made me feel real good that Hendrix was sittin' in the control room listening to my stuff."

MourningStar
06-16-10, 08:20 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/ec1.jpg

"Jimi played this gig that was just blinding. I don't think Jack had taken him in before. I knew what the guy was capable of from the minute I met him. It was the complete embodiment of the different aspects of rock & roll guitar rolled up into one. When Jack did see it that night, after the gig he went home and came up with the riff. It was strictly a dedication to Jimi. And then we wrote a song on top of it."

ilovejimi
06-16-10, 08:25 PM
Power Of Philly Soul: Blue-eyed soul-popster Daryl Hall (63) is one half of the most successful charting duo in the U.S., Daryl Hall and John Oates. Celebrating the release of the 4-CD boxed set Do What You Want, Be What You Are: The Music of Daryl Hall and John Oates (RCA/Legacy), Hall got on the phone on 8 October 2010 to discuss where Jimi intersected his life.

UniVibes: I asked your partner John Oates this question (during a lunchtime interview in NYC on 29 October 2002; see the USoterica column in UniVibes issue #43, December 2002), so now it’s your turn: Where does Jimi Hendrix fit into your world?

Daryl Hall: Well, if you asked John, I’m sure he said, “Really high.” [chuckles] I remember Hendrix from when we were kids, but I was never really a guitar player myself. I mean, sure, I can play, but John has been a guitar player since he was five. He was just blown away by Jimi Hendrix. In some ways, he was influenced by him because John was always a Curtis Mayfield guy, and there’s a lot of Curtis Mayfield in Jimi Hendrix.

UV: Right, just on Electric Ladyland alone…
DH: Yeah, you really can hear that. So that really resonated with John. He was really a Jimi guy, and I was, of course, in awe of his sonic abilities.

UV: Any particular song of his stand out for you?
DH: Shit, man, any of the ones from that first album…[pauses] “Foxy Lady.” Do you even need any more than that? Just a groundbreaking collection of songs.

UV: Did his songwriting or playing style have any bearing on how you approach any of your own material?
DH: The freedom he had always interested me. I don’t know if he directly influenced me, but he’s a reference. He’s certainly somebody, over the years, whom I’ve thought of enough to where I’ve said in the studio, “Why don’t we try this Hendrixy kind of thing?” And let’s not forget I did a lot of my best work in Electric Lady Studios [such as 1982’s multiplatinum H2O]. You’d see him there looking on from the wall. [chuckles]

UV: So did you get to catch him live during your college days at Temple University in Philadelphia?
DH: I did, actually. I saw him at the Factory. [The Electric Factory, either on 21 or 22 February 1968.] It wasn’t one of his better nights, I’ll say that. He went on and on and on, I don’t know how the drugs were running that night. And Woody’s Truck Stop opened [which featured a young Todd Rundgren, a longtime friend/associate of Hall’s, on guitar].

UV: Have you ever sung any Hendrix material yourself?
DH: Me? No. John did some strange version of “Have You Ever Been (To Electric Ladyland)” on one of his solo albums [2002’s Phunk Shui]. But I haven’t. I’m not sure how that would transfer to my particular style.

UV: Oh, I don’t know, I could see you doing “Crosstown Traffic.”
DH: Hmm, maybe. Anything’s possible. Maybe I’ll pull it out for one of the “Live from Daryl’s House” sessions; get some strange guitar player involved, and we could lean toward Jimi for a little while there. [For more about Daryl’s “playing music with my friends and putting it up on the Internet,” go to www.livefromdarylshouse.com.]


* Pour Some Fire on Me: In 2008, Def Leppard guitarist Phil Collen (51) pulled double duty by singing and playing guitar on Surreal (VH1 Classic), an album from one of his side projects, Man-Raze. During a long chat on 11 July of last year, Collen delved into the Jimi effect.

UV: Have you done any Jimi covers?
Phil Collen: Yeah, “Fire.” That was great. It was a very natural thing that fell right into place.

UV: Tell me about Hendrix being an influence on you as a player.
Phil Collen: This may sound a little weird, but I really think he was underestimated as an all-around musician. He had a certain kind of expression, but many people see him as “just” a guitar player.

UV: People forget he was a great songwriter.
PC: Absolutely. There are only few people who can write songs that come out of them every which way, almost like they’ve been channeled. Stevie Wonder used to be like that, as well as some of the great composers. It’s something that may be beyond normal people’s comprehension. With Hendrix, it just struck him, and sometimes he couldn’t even get it all out.

What was really cool and really unique is that you never really heard another player like that. There’ve been some jazz guys, like Miles Davis. If Hendrix was still alive and he could still channel those things through him, I think he’d be doing some really crazy stuff. He’d be more dialed into it and figured out where it came from.

UV: What would you say is your favorite Hendrix song?
PC: I really like “Freedom,” which came out after he died, but it had such a groove and the fire in his playing, it was fucking wonderful. And the first album had some stuff on there that was just off the fucking chart. Even with “Hey Joe” – no one had really done it like that. The blues players couldn’t do that stuff. And all of a sudden there’s this guy who’s got it all: he’s got this rhythm stuff going on, R&B, and jazz. He’s the first real electric guitar player, really, which was mindblowing in itself.

UV: You think about the songwriting on tracks like “The Wind Cries Mary,” “Machine Gun”…
PC: Beautiful! And this was a guy who was in his twenties! I was starting to realize new stuff as player in my late forties, so you wonder what would have kicked in with him in his sixties

Sharpstat
06-16-10, 09:01 PM
Eddie Kramer

http://img63.imageshack.us/img63/4034/eddiekramer.jpg



After the ceremony I walked over to him and asked him for a video comment and he looked at the camera and said, "I miss him"!
Hollywood star dedication ceremony 1995

Anyone have a Hi-8 deck so I can transfer this stuff?

MourningStar
06-16-10, 09:08 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/rd1.jpg

"The dressing rooms at Monterey were under the stage and one memory that will live with me forever is of sitting under there with Jimi during the change-over between two acts. Jimi was playing 'Sgt Pepper' on his guitar but, and this was the amazing thing, he was playing all the parts. He would go from a bit of orchestration, to a vocal part, to a solo - the whole thing on one guitar, and he was accompanied by me, Mama Cass, Brian Jones, Janis Joplin and a bunch of other rockers, all of us banging on anything that came to hand."

MourningStar
06-18-10, 12:26 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/TReid.jpg

"We were all hanging out in Carnaby Street. at the Bag O'Nails-Keith, Mick Jagger. Brian (Jones) comes skipping through, like, all happy about something. Paul McCartney walks in. Jeff beck walks in. Jimmy Page. I thought, 'What's this? A bloody convention or something?'

"Here comes Jimi, one of his military jackets, hair all over the place, pulls out this left-handed Stratocaster, beat to hell, looks like he's been chopping wood with it. And all these guitar players in the audience, they're all goin', 'Look at this, er, ugh, yeah right, sure, nice try.'

"And he gets up, all soft-spoken. And all of a sudden, 'WHOOOR-RRAAAWWRR!!!'. And he breaks into 'Wild Thing', and it was all over. There were guitar players weeping. They had to mop the floor up. He was piling it on, solo after solo. I could see everyone's fillings falling out. When he finished, it was silence. Nobody knew what to do. Everybody was completely in shock."

stplsd
06-18-10, 11:29 PM
"We were all hanging out in Carnaby Street....

Terry's mind was (obviously) blown by Jimi (although Terry was himself a great guitarist he was primarily a singer, and he has a great descrption , but this is not the one.

BTW although not a songwriter, Terry was the biz, check out Ytube & the film "Groupie". Glastonbury as it was (a far cry):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8vBn65wTR0

Aretha Franklin: "There are only three things happening in London: The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and Terry Reid."

stplsd
06-19-10, 09:35 AM
"One of the wrongs I did in my life," Ike Turner once declared, "was that I fired this guy because he was too slow with them pedals [screaming trees], and come to find out ten or twelve years later it was Jimi Hendrix. You can't win 'em all . . . . ."

There weren't any "pedals" in early '65, fuzz maybe, "slow"? I'll go with Tina.

stplsd
06-19-10, 09:39 AM
JORMA KAUKONEN
http://muslib.ru/groupe/2225/artist.jpg

"Hendrix is a superlative musician but I really liked Clapton's crisper kind of style better."

Yeah , I can see that, and that's why Jorma is such a crap guitarist in the scale of.

stplsd
06-19-10, 09:48 AM
"I loved his vocals, you know? I thought he was probably the best I’d ever seen at singing and playing guitar at the same time. It’s like he could divide his mind into two places at once. He didn’t even have to think about what his guitar hands were doing while he was singing. That really amazed me."

A point that is severely overlooked. "Jimi was a great guitarist" he was so much more than any other guitarist ever was or has been since. A fantastic singer, songwriter, producer, innovitive engineer, studio builder/designer/owner/b (ie concept) of (one of?) the most famous.

stplsd
06-19-10, 10:10 AM
"I was sitting near the back of the Cheetah when I noticed
a guitarist in the back line of Curtis Knight's band whose playing
mesmerized me."

Bullshit, the "back line" was the rhythm section in their small band (piano (sometimes), bass & drums (ie basically a three piece, with a singer (occasionally guitar) - the Who?) with Jimi clearly, in all photos, an up front obvious attraction alongside Curtis (the only two consistent members ie basically Jimi & Curtis' "band name". Curtis had some pull as he was a former member of the famous Inkspots etc. Jimi was a nobody), and if the "live" (obviously recorded in a studio) tapes are anything to go by he featured as a solo artist on at least some numbers, with Curtis relegated to backing musician. Even during his tenure with Little Richard he appears to be putting himself forward viz the [only?] photo, and the TV film of him with Richard's band backing Buddy & Stacy [members of Richard's revue] where he is as up front as poss. with his "long hair" and using his "show off" sliding his arm down the neck and his 'almost dancing' style. Then there is the [should be] famous colour photo of him wowing the "black" crowd at the "Grotto" in a white satin shirt and "long hair", with the Iselys entering stage left obviously lauding him (as in "check this guy, amazing, or what?).

stplsd
06-19-10, 10:33 AM
Eric Dolphy (C. 1972-73): "His death hit me really hard, and Coltrane. I don't think the world treats artists the right way anyhow. I don't thionk they ever have."

stplsd
06-19-10, 10:39 AM
Don Van Vliet (Captain Beefheart)(C. 1972-73): I don't feel he knew how much he could have done, cause he was so good. I felt that he was one of the only good ones on that instrument. He wasn't afraid to experiment. But those drugs, man, that hard stuff, that should have gone out after Charlie Parker, don't you think ? That's no way to expand your mind. I don't know why anybody ever thought it was. All it ends up to be is hard stuff; hard stuff, hard life. But Jimi, he was just so good. There was so much he could have done."
Don apparently (along with many others) assumed Jimi simply OD'd on smack [like not a few famous jazzers previously], or whatever.

stplsd
06-19-10, 12:24 PM
Charles Lloyd (C. 1972-73): "He was a young dude, and I had hoped that in his life­time he wouldn't have to pay the same dues as people like Prez [Lester Young] and Bird [Charlie Parker] and Billie Holliday had to pay. But he was sweet and soft and had a vulnerable nature. I don't know what took Jimi to that place, but its pretty painful to me. What can you say ? We live in this fucked-up world. People who make music some­how have to be protected. I don't know quite what that means but maybe we shouldn't be subjected to that kind of thing."

dino77
06-19-10, 01:21 PM
Bullshit, the "back line" was the rhythm section in their small band (piano (sometimes), bass & drums (ie basically a three piece, with a singer (occasionally guitar) - the Who?) with Jimi clearly, in all photos, an up front obvious attraction alongside Curtis (the only two consistent members ie basically Jimi & Curtis' "band name". Curtis had some pull as he was a former member of the famous Inkspots etc. Jimi was a nobody), and if the "live" (obviously recorded in a studio) tapes are anything to go by he featured as a solo artist on at least some numbers, with Curtis relegated to backing musician. Even during his tenure with Little Richard he appears to be putting himself forward viz the [only?] photo, and the TV film of him with Richard's band backing Buddy & Stacy [members of Richard's revue] where he is as up front as poss. with his "long hair" and using his "show off" sliding his arm down the neck and his 'almost dancing' style. Then there is the [should be] famous colour photo of him wowing the "black" crowd at the "Grotto" in a white satin shirt and "long hair", with the Iselys entering stage left obviously lauding him (as in "check this guy, amazing, or what?).

Yes, Linda's "back line" description has always bothered me. Jimi was the band's star player and is up front in all known Squires photos (but he is in the back line with B & S no matter how hard he tries to shine). Like she's trying to underline her extraordinary talent scout instincts. Jimi's talent must have been apparent to anyone. Indeed he already had quite a reputation in NY among musicians and had already attracted a few influential music biz people (Juggy Murray, Hammond, Les Paul etc).

The kudos for Jimi's "discovery" should go to Chas who saw the raw potential in Jimi, had ideas and took action.

MourningStar
06-19-10, 01:47 PM
The kudos for Jimi's "discovery" should go to Chas who saw the raw potential in Jimi and acted upon it.The 'raw potential' was seen by many, not just Chas. His only credit here is he 'acted upon it' as you put it. However, the key is Jimi's raw potential. It was only a matter of time. Chas just happened to be the one. Who knows where things would be today if it had been someone else, like oh, ... what about Albert Grossman. Given the 'climate', it's safe to think that American management would never have created a 'Wild Man of Borneo' image for Jimi.

However, we are off-topic and this is not the place for such discussion. Let's stay with the spirit of the topic and keep posting the quotations about Jimi. Someone can start a new topic to continue this if they desire. Beware, the mods are watching!

Fenders Fingers
06-19-10, 02:30 PM
The 'raw potential' was seen by many, not just Chas. His only credit here is he 'acted upon it' as you put it. However, the key is Jimi's raw potential. It was only a matter of time. Chas just happened to be the one. Who knows where things would be today if it had been someone else, like oh, ... what about Albert Grossman. Given the 'climate', it's safe to think that American management would never have created a 'Wild Man of Borneo' image for Jimi.

However, we are off-topic and this is not the place for such discussion. Let's stay with the spirit of the topic and keep posting the quotations about Jimi. Someone can start a new topic to continue this if they desire. Beware, the mods are watching!

So take it to another thread!
Nice subject and I'll add to your comment re WMOB image we would not have had THE JIMI HENDRIX we love and know. I doubt he would have developed as he did without Chas.

MourningStar
06-19-10, 02:32 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/jp.jpg.

"I must've been 16 or 17 when 'Purple Haze' came out. I remember thinking, 'Now we're getting radio from Mars'. The guitar sounded like a monster coming out of the speakers."

MourningStar
06-19-10, 02:39 PM
... re WMOB image we would not have had THE JIMI HENDRIX we love and know. I doubt he would have developed as he did without Chas.right, we might have had an even better Jimi and one still around today. But as i said, this and alternate universes are for another thread. Start it yourself.

Fenders Fingers
06-19-10, 02:44 PM
A question of what age JH, JM, KB, died just popped up on TV (National Lottery) !!
Anyway, we could have a worse Jimi still around today ..... you start it:p

scoutship
06-19-10, 02:49 PM
right, we might have had an even better Jimi and one still around today. But as i said, this and alternate universes are for another thread. Start it yourself.

Hadn't there already been such a thread here?

Fenders Fingers
06-19-10, 03:33 PM
?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?! ?!?!????????!!!!!!!!??!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!? !?!?!?!????????????????!!!!!!!!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!? !?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?

Fenders Fingers
06-19-10, 03:44 PM
probably ... however, some people are too lazy to look (or start one) and would rather just crap all over whatever one is handy at their moment.


?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?! ?!?!????????!!!!!!!!??!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!? !?!?!?!????????????????!!!!!!!!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!? !?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?

Correct order to the posts !
Don't be lazy man, start it or dig out the earlier one :docd:

MourningStar
06-19-10, 03:50 PM
Hadn't there already been such a thread here?probably ... however, some people are too lazy to look (or start one) and would rather just crap all over whatever one is handy at their moment.

Fenders Fingers
06-19-10, 04:01 PM
Oh dear :-)
Can't hack it old chap ?

MourningStar
06-19-10, 04:14 PM
?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?! ?!?!????????!!!!!!!!??!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!? !?!?!?!????????????????!!!!!!!!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!? !?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?You, sir, singlehandedly drag the list's collective IQ to frightening new lows ...

Fenders Fingers
06-19-10, 04:21 PM
You, sir, singlehandedly drag the list's collective IQ to frightening new lows ...

With your assistance unknown levels can be accieved :-) :-)
With you on board no low is too low !

MourningStar
06-19-10, 04:35 PM
ok - now that we got that out of the way, ...
back to our regular scheduled program.

Dino Danelli

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/dd.jpg

"We had to let the audience calm down before we went on because no one had ever seen anything like that."

MourningStar
06-19-10, 04:47 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/ps.jpg

"I went out to sit with Mama Cass to watch Jimi and, as he started doing this stuff with his guitar, she turned around to me, she said to me, 'He's stealing your act.' And I said, 'No, he's not stealing my act, he's doing my act.' And that was the thing. for me it was an act, and for him it was something else. It was an extension of what he was doing."

scoutship
06-20-10, 06:11 PM
Buddy Guy and B.B. King on their first meetings with Jimi Hendrix (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lJ8Fl771sBg)

MourningStar
06-23-10, 04:23 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/dm.jpg

"... my God, he must have been born with a guitar in his hands! ...There are a lot of great guitar players around, but there will never be another Hendrix. "

MourningStar
08-09-10, 11:19 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/jb1.jpg

"Jimi defied everything people were doing at the time. He broke all the rules and made it work. Just fantastic! His stuff is super. I know it is super."

MourningStar
08-09-10, 11:35 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/jmc.jpg

"In a world permeated with plasticized feelings, complacency, insincerity and insensitivity, Jimi roared, laughed, screamed and danced his way through an all too short life with a naked innocence that will be missed by more than a few."

Scrum Drum
08-10-10, 12:42 AM
Eric Clapton to Chas Chandler while pale and fumbling to light a cigarette backstage after seeing Jimi for the first time as he stood-in with Cream for a song:


"You didn't tell me he was THAT f*cking good!"


Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha...



.

MourningStar
08-10-10, 01:03 AM
^
well, since you mention EC here is an excerpt from his autobio.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/ec1-1.jpg

"I will never forget returning to London after recording 'Disraeli Gears', with all of us excited by the fact that we had made what we considered to be a groundbreaking album, a magical combination of blues, rock and jazz. Unfortunately for us, Jimi had just released 'Are You Experienced?', and that was all anyone wanted to listen to. He kicked everybody into touch, really, and was the flavor not just of the month but of the year. Everywhere you went it was just wall-to-wall Jimi, and I felt really down. I thought we had made our definitive album, only to come home and find that no one was interested. It was the beginning of a disenchantment with England, where it seemed there wasn't really room for more than one person to be popular at a time. What I loved about America was ..."



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/AVATAR/peace5.gif

dino77
08-10-10, 01:43 AM
"In a world permeated with plasticized feelings, complacency, insincerity and insensitivity, Jimi roared, laughed, screamed and danced his way through an all too short life with a naked innocence that will be missed by more than a few."

A musician with an intellect, wow :). McLaughlin is great.

copen
08-11-10, 01:41 PM
Eric Dolphy (C. 1972-73): "His death hit me really hard, and Coltrane. I don't think the world treats artists the right way anyhow. I don't thionk they ever have."


dolphy said this about jh in C. 1972-73?
is that really possible.

copen
08-12-10, 10:36 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/RolandKirk.jpg

"They put Jimi Hendrix in a bag. They called him a pop artist. But Hendrix was a stoned blues player."

that should be 'stone blues player'. as in stone cold blues player.

stplsd
08-22-10, 04:49 PM
dolphy said this about jh in C. 1972-73?
is that really possible.

Well since Dolphy died in 1964 Knight was obviously communicating with him in the spirit realm (as he also did with Jimi;-)

MourningStar
08-22-10, 04:54 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/Timothy_Leary.jpg

"In the fall of 1969 I was in New York to cut a rap album entitled 'You Can Be Anything This Time Around'. Alan Douglas was the producer. Whenever Jimi and I were in New York at the same time we used to hang out together, talking about cosmic matters. Jimi generously offered to sit in on the recording session and lay down some background tracks. It was a memorable event for me. Jimi playing the bass guitar with his left hand, Steve Stills, John Sebastian, Buddy Miles on drums. Jann Wenner was in the control room grumbling that he wasn't allowed to touch the mixing dials. Anyway, the record sure had a great beat. I was proud as could be to share this moment with the man I believe to best represent the spirit of the 1960s."

Fenders Fingers
08-22-10, 04:56 PM
dolphy said this about jh in C. 1972-73?
is that really possible.

With the power of soul ........................ anything is possible.




Sing up at the back now :-)

Steev
09-17-10, 01:55 AM
This post has been sitting far too long. :-|
And yet, on a particularly miserable, rainy night in Philly this one was hard to type & put up when I saw it . . . .
I've just been thinking too much lately . . . .

=================================

"I'll never stop missing that brilliant boy.
How I would have loved to have played or sung on an album with Hendrix! He brought excitement into the room with him.
Just his physical presence was amazing, much less his music! Ah, Jimi lad, we'll love you forever . . . ."
In 1977 John Lennon told this to me, his voice cracking with emotion . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pete Townshend

jhendrixfanatic
09-29-10, 02:56 PM
"There's only two types of guitarists around today. There are those who admit being influenced by Jimi Hendrix, and those who try to pretend they aren't. We will never again see anyone like him, and I was blessed and privileged to know him and have played with him for the time that I did."

- Billy Cox

lsdmofro
09-30-10, 03:51 AM
I would have to say Jimi Hendrix, Joe Strummer, Skerik, Henry Rollins, Phillip Lynott, and John Lee Hooker are probably my top 6 favorite musicians of the top of my head right now. I mean, there are so many more, but I reach for these guys in times of trouble and moments of inspiration. And I reach for many others in many different genres, cultures, etc... With that said, I just found, not much, but a snippet of an interview on Jaz Coleman talking about Hendrix! I wish I heard the rest of this! If anyone knows where this came from...please point me in the right direction. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b4gV10NUAu4&feature=related

So, this made me just now wanna find what these cats I like said about Hendrix...just found Rollins...shit, no one can speak for him! "Like a Fish in Water with a Guitar!" Ha! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMojQg5vf7M

Same interview, but on Monterey Pop: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Miv-0OaIG9s

"...Clapton has had 30 years and he's still dwarfed by Jimi Hendrix..this kid"... Classic Hank who knows his shit! HA HA I'm LOL...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYJ7tvQFnow

I'm quite sure there's simply has to be quite a bit on Strummer talking Hendrix...can't find anything...

I remember when I was a about 17, I read about Lynott being offered the starring role to play Jimi in a movie...because he could actually pull off the musical parts and because they had much in common breaking the race barrier...plus he had "The Fro" but then Lynott O'D'd & died...that might have been really something...

Lynott and Eric Bell (who's playing is very influence by Jimi and Bell kicks ass! Check out the 1st 3 Thin Lizzy records) even wrote a song about Jimi.
Here at the 3:19 mark Phil Lynott talks about Hendrix...but it's not much...
The guy interviewing him is sure a knob job! Only thing I could find...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hrI9Qs97xQ

MourningStar
02-28-11, 01:56 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/BG-Apoc.jpg

"Jimi first came to San Francisco right after Monterey and played the Filmore with Gabor Szabo and Jefferson Airplane. That was the first night. Afterward, the Airplane asked him if they could open the show. Jimi took the town by storm"

stplsd
02-28-11, 02:19 PM
^
Thanks MS any details on this great shot?

purple jim
02-28-11, 03:16 PM
^Apocalypse Now!!!!

stplsd
02-28-11, 03:56 PM
^
Thanks PJ. Must watch it again, haven't seen it since it came out.

MourningStar
03-28-11, 11:57 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/JohnnyWinter1969.jpg

"... Jimi would hook up all these different things together and know how to work them. It was really amazing what he could do with them, it was like playing a whole other instrument. It was blues, but it was Jimi. It was like 21 st century music. He took ideas from everywhere, but it all came out Jimi Hendrix. There'll never be anybody who could do what he did any better."

thunderbaas
03-30-11, 12:42 AM
Several people talking about Jimi in this link,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoVhsbGytfs&NR=1
Thunderbaas.

thunderbaas
03-31-11, 11:24 PM
Probably known to some CTTers allready,but here's a link to a nice interview in 2005's Guitarworld
with Mitch Mitchel & Billy Cox.
http://www.guitarworld.com/article/jimi_hendrix_star_power
Thunderbaas.

MourningStar
07-10-11, 11:18 PM
http://i394.photobucket.com/albums/pp25/JimiFreak/RC.jpg

"Jimi was a very spiritually attuned person. He was always searching for the truth -- the reality of life! The answers to some of his questions appeared in some of his songs via his imagination, his hopes and his dreams for humanity."

MourningStar
07-11-11, 09:23 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/Robby-2.jpg

"Well, I’d been into blues before. But, you know, when I heard that he would sit down and pick apart Albert King licks and stuff like that, you know, that kind of was a lightbulb on my brain because I’d never really done that. Before that, rock 'n roll guitar to me was more of a means than an end, you know what I mean? I didn’t really consider rock 'n roll guitar as being that big of a deal until he came out. Before that playing guitar for me was more of a way to meet girls and stuff, you know? [laughs] I got more serious about it, let me put it that way, after he came around."

TwistedLogic
09-09-11, 11:36 AM
Kirk Hammet (Metallica)
http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6125/5927367465_b9226a1275.jpg

"I was struck by Jimi Hendrix at a young age. If I remember it correctly, I caught a documentary about Jimi when I was a kid and I was hooked. Something about his style just moved me. He’s a guy I still listen to all the time."



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bq3MPcIca_k

TwistedLogic
09-09-11, 11:49 AM
Sting
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2224/1883979655_f6ec847e8a.jpg

"I've always loved Hendrix. He's one of the reasons I became a musician. He's the first musician I ever saw live who was a virtuoso. I saw him in Newcastle, my hometown. I'd never seen a black man before. The guy was six feet tall, with this Afro haircut, dressed like some 17th century guy...playing left-handed guitar, destroying his amplifier, setting it on fire."


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCrpAsX1w4Y
my all time favourite cover of Little Wing, the guy playing the guitar solo is Hiram Bullock (1955-2008) also known as huge fan of Jimi Hendrix.

TwistedLogic
09-09-11, 12:28 PM
Albert King
http://www.bobcorritore.com/images/Albert King, mdj-hobus.jpg

This is an excerpt of Alan Paul interview with Albert King, full article here.
(http://www.alanpaulinchina.com/2011/02/from-archives-albert-king.html)

Alan Paul: I’ve heard stories of people who tried to copy your sound but didn’t know that you were playing upside down.

Albert King: [Laughs.] Yeah, I’ve heard that, too. And people who try to restring their guitars to get my sound, and everything else you can imagine. Jimi Hendrix used to take pictures of my fingers to try and see what I was doing. He never quite figured it out, but Jimi was a hell of guitar player, the fastest dude around at the time. There’s some kids who are coming around now...Whew! Forget about it. They burn up the fretboard.

Alan Paul: Obviously, Hendrix was a great guitarist. But what do you think of him as a blues player?

Albert King: Well, to me, he was overplaying to play the blues. He’d hit two or three good licks here and there and then speed them up and hit them over and over until he’d drown out all the good ones. The kids loved it and I liked his playing, too, that was his style. But don’t call him a great bluesman. I think he was going more in that direction, but we’ll never know. He didn’t take care of himself.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohZYDZmo7hQ
Recorded in 1991, a year before his death. Some say Jimi came up with Red House influenced by Albert King. If it's true then these guys are tributing each other.:minipersonen065:

dino77
09-09-11, 01:10 PM
Pathetic attitude from Albert after the way Jimi bolstered his career - professional jealousy.

Fenders Fingers
09-09-11, 04:26 PM
Just saying as he saw it I'd say.
Jimi may have been born from the blues but it is questionable if he is / was really an out and out blues player.
Really, would we class AYE, ABAL and ELL as blues albums?
These older blues players really did cut it back to the bone so anyone putting an extra note or two into a lick would be "overplaying" by his/ here standards lol.

TwistedLogic
09-09-11, 06:02 PM
These older blues players really did cut it back to the bone so anyone putting an extra note or two into a lick would be "overplaying" by his/ here standards lol.

Yes, Albert King was a hardliner bluesman. And that extra overplaying might be just the use of wah-pedal or the extended solos, or just... Steve Winwood's organ in Voodoo Chile haha, I just don't know. But these are things that Albert King incorporated later in his career in the 80's. Just like Muddy Waters psychedelic effort, the album "Electric Mud" (released 1968), trying to reach new audience. I think B.B. King and Buddy Guy were one of the few blues players who treated Jimi fairly.

BobJahBob
09-09-11, 06:48 PM
As much as i admire guy's like Albert King, Muddy Waters, BB King & Buddy Guy who obviously influenced jimi alot in his early days I've never really lobbed Jimi in with that lot he was far too inventive & searching as musician to be labeled just a blues guitarist who went supernova.
It doesn't surprise me that albert king & buddy guy have said some unusual things about jimi over the years because they just never got him. Jimi had something most of those blues guys lack in abundance IMAGINATION lol.
IMO the strain of electric blues back then was far too pedestrian to hold Jimi's interest for too long

TwistedLogic
09-09-11, 07:22 PM
As Buddy Guy admits himself, the reason might be just the hippie girls he was chasing back then hehe

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lJ8Fl771sBg

Anywat I do not expect to hear or read words from the legendary bluesmen admiting that Jimi was better than themselves. But I know they appreciate his contribution.

MourningStar
09-11-11, 05:43 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/XiKano/PHOTO/West.jpg

" ... one of the strangest things I saw in New York was when I was there with Allen Toussaint recording. I was down by the Ed Sullivan Theater, and I saw Jimi Hendrix. Matter of fact, he gave me a scarf and a guitar pick. I remember I thought he was really weird. But I'm weird, we were both looking weird, and that's when I realized who he was. ... you know, Jimi was much weirder than I was! ... At that time people in New York would look at you like, "Who are these strange looking people?" 'Cause with the lace shirts and the leather vests, they wasn't dressing that way yet."

TwistedLogic
06-20-12, 08:15 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRtIRvztbwY

buffalorattle
09-28-12, 05:51 PM
Larry Coryell remembers Jimi, not sure of the interview date but Blues album gets a mention


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQbN-hFz2EA

Roland Stone
12-13-12, 08:45 PM
Michael Shrieve (Santana drummer featured in the Woodstock movie).

"Sorry, I never met him!"

That's what Michael Shrieve wrote to me yesterday when I asked if he had any Hendrix stories he could share with us.

Cherokee Mist
12-16-12, 05:07 PM
http://wcbsfm.cbslocal.com/2012/11/26/hendrix-at-70-from-lemmy-to-frampton-legends-sound-off/

a few quotes on this short article ..

Ron The Bear
12-17-12, 07:36 AM
Neil Young
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Admin/BkFill/Default_image_group/2011/11/30/1322677909438/NEIL-YOUNG-007.jpg

"Absolutely the best guitar player that ever lived; there was no one even in the same building as that guy."

jhendrixfanatic
03-17-13, 12:01 AM
19591

Bruce Cockburn

In the late ’60s you were in bands that opened for the Jimi Hendrix Experience, Wilson Pickett and Cream. How did being in the midst of such a great musical renaissance affect your artistic path? Was there a sense at the time that these artists would prove so immortal, or at the very least highly influential?


Influential yeah; hardly immortal. I’ve never been much for hero worship. But I really held both Clapton’s guitar playing and Hendrix’s guitar playing in high esteem. Hendrix actually seemed—well he and his gang seemed to be pretty reasonable people. They spoke to us for one thing, so they weren’t standoffish, but they were pretty darned tired and on the smelly side from lack of laundering. But they played great and that was an exciting thing to be part of for sure … the thing Hendrix gave everyone license to do was turn up.

http://flaglive.com/flagstafflive_story.cfm?storyID=237440

Mysticbumwipe
03-25-13, 05:11 AM
Here is a great description describing how (and why) people AT THE TIME reacted to hearing Jimi for the first time..

I love the honesty, humility and self-awareness of this line: "...I was hurt for a moment or two to see someone else jump miles ahead of me, but I got over that feeling by the second chorus, because I was totally caught up in what he was doing...."


"I first met Jimi at the Monterey Pop Festival. We had jammed a little bit the night before, but I had never seen or heard Jimi play with his trio.

By luck, I was hanging out with Jimi backstage before he went on. He was pretty wound up. I thought he was high on acid, and I wondered how he was going to pull it off. The Who had just done their thing, and the audience was in shock. No one had ever seen a band tear up its equipment like that before, and the stage was a mess. A lot of equipment had been broken, and mic lines and monitors weren’t working. Everything had to be reset, and there was a long wait and lots of confusion.

I was immediately amazed when he opened with “Killing Floor.” I had heard Wolf and Hubert play it so many times in Chicago, and when I saw what Jimi did to it, it was as if what I had been trying to do for years suddenly became perfectly clear. I immediately understood what I had been longing and searching for. I was hurt for a moment or two to see someone else jump miles ahead of me, but I got over that feeling by the second chorus, because I was totally caught up in what he was doing.

Then, he did “Foxey Lady.” Wow! What a moment. The sound was so deep and powerful and free.

Then came “Like a Rolling Stone,” which was so cool and smart because it expanded everything and included even more of what everyone was thinking and feeling.

“Rock Me Baby” has always been one of my favorite songs, and the way Jimi kicked it was so much fun. It was what Chicago blues needed to become.

“Hey Joe” was next. “Hey Joe”? What the hell? It was suddenly a really great piece.

“Can You See Me” was followed by “The Wind Cries Mary,” which was so soulful and so beautiful, and then “Purple Haze” and “Wild Thing.”
Only nine songs, and everything in my musical world had been sorted out and a way to the future clearly shown.

It was so great to hear these songs delivered in such a beautiful, energetic way by such a soulful performer.

When Jimi decided to burn the guitar, it was a very awkward and painful thing to watch after such great playing, and I was embarrassed for him. But it happened.
It’s not a perfect world, but there were a few minutes there when it was.

I was 24 years old that night, and I was fortunate to become friends with Jimi. I saw him play live many times. We got to hang, and I always thought he was the Duke Ellington of the rock world."

--Steve Miller.

Rubem
03-25-13, 10:10 PM
So...after that, in so many ways, great testimonial, Steve ends up not diggin the guitar bonfire...


It was so great to read these thoughts delivered in such a beautiful, sensitive way by such a soulful witness.


When Steve decided to burn the burning, it was a very awkward and painful thing to read after such great talking, and I was embarrassed for him. But it happened.


It’s really not a perfect world, but there were a few paragraphs there when it was...

outasight
03-26-13, 06:29 AM
So...after that, in so many ways, great testimonial, Steve ends up not diggin the guitar bonfire...


It was so great to read these thoughts delivered in such a beautiful, sensitive way by such a soulful witness.


When Steve decided to burn the burning, it was a very awkward and painful thing to read after such great talking, and I was embarrassed for him. But it happened.


It’s really not a perfect world, but there were a few paragraphs there when it was...

Hahahaha !!!!!

cool9
03-27-13, 12:52 AM
May 16, 1970, Steve Miller.

The last time they (Grateful Dead) appeared together was on May 16, 1970, playing a bill at Temple University in Philadelphia along with Steve Miller. Miller saw Hendrix backstage and says,

"He was really sick. He looked like he was really strung out. He had a bunch of Mafia thugs who were working with him. The Grateful Dead played, then we played, then Jimi. When Jimi came out and walked by me, he smelled so bad it almost made you sick. He and Mitch Mitchell had just shot up a whole lot of methedrine and he was completely wigged out. They were both in really bad shape."

A tape was made of Hendrix's show and it's one of the poorest shows of an erratic year for him - he's obviously quite wasted. Audience members also started taping the Dead's show until they were stopped by a mean Sam Cutler:

http://deadessays.blogspot.com/2009/08/hendrix-and-dead.html

stplsd
03-27-13, 05:20 PM
May 16, 1970, Steve Miller.

The last time they (Grateful Dead) appeared together was on May 16, 1970, playing a bill at Temple University in Philadelphia along with Steve Miller. Miller saw Hendrix backstage and says,

"He was really sick. He looked like he was really strung out. He had a bunch of Mafia thugs who were working with him. The Grateful Dead played, then we played, then Jimi. When Jimi came out and walked by me, he smelled so bad it almost made you sick. He and Mitch Mitchell had just shot up a whole lot of methedrine and he was completely wigged out. They were both in really bad shape."

Sounds like this guy is mixing it up as he goes along? It's not what I remember Miller saying. I remember him saying Jimi stank, But he said it like "the smell of death", or something that just sounded like retrospect bullshit. Don't remember him saying anything about Mafia or meth?