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Thread: Who Influenced Jimi?

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    Exclamation Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    Quote Originally Posted by souldoggie View Post
    Speaking about publishing....check it out, radio station stamped date "May 4, 1968" on Capitol Records no less. Our good friend Ed was going for the whole song catalog by the looks of this. LOL.

    [snipped scan]

    Holy shit! In 1968?!

    BTW, in case others aren't familiar with it (I wasn't): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOC1vAldWds

    Quote Originally Posted by youtube_description (dunno exactly how much is bullshit (some obviously is))
    Now a short story about the Next To Your Fire single:
    Former Pack producer John Rhys (who wrote and produced the very first Pack single back in 1965) had been contacted by Jim Atherton [The Pack's manager] and Don Brewer to represent them again, as he had recently engaged with Capitol records to promote acts from Detroit. So, HE WAS the first to position the band in Capitol records.
    Rhys had been given a demo copy of [Next To Your] Fire, directly by Jimmi Hendrix when in England and thought that song would be tremendous for Mark Farner and The Pack.
    While many of the younger at Capitol thought the record was a 'smash' the powers that didn't understand the product, wouldn't allocate the funds to fully promote the single. Even worse, later that year they refused to release 'The Pack' LP, basically consisted of material that ended up one year later [1969] on 'On Time'
    .

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  3. #142
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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    I can tell you one that surprised me....The Band! Tears of Rage. He liked it so much he recorded his own version. Interesting to me being a big Band fan.
    'The very fact you oppose this makes me think I'm onto something'

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    I don't know if this one has been mentioned. An inspiration for Jimi's opening for "Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)"?


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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    Quote Originally Posted by outasight View Post
    I can tell you one that surprised me....The Band! Tears of Rage. He liked it so much he recorded his own version. Interesting to me being a big Band fan.
    He was a major Dylan fan, that's why he recorded Tears of Rage. It was originally recorded in summer 67 and among the Basement Tapes circulated soon after by Albert Grossman. So Jimi's covering Bob's, not The Band's version - which was released in mid -68 after Jimi's cover was recorded.
    Who knows if he liked The Band - in one interview Jimi says that he wishes Bob could play with musicians that are more creative.

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    Quote Originally Posted by dino77 View Post
    He was a major Dylan fan, that's why he recorded Tears of Rage. It was originally recorded in summer 67 and among the Basement Tapes circulated soon after by Albert Grossman. So Jimi's covering Bob's, not The Band's version - which was released in mid -68 after Jimi's cover was recorded.
    Who knows if he liked The Band - in one interview Jimi says that he wishes Bob could play with musicians that are more creative.
    Interesting. Do you know when this interview took place?

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Summerisle View Post
    Interesting. Do you know when this interview took place?
    Pretty sure it was a printed interview and I know it's here somewhere! Can't remember the date, sorry. Will look for it.

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    Quote Originally Posted by dino77 View Post
    Who knows if he liked The Band - in one interview Jimi says that he wishes Bob could play with musicians that are more creative.
    Yes, I remember this statement, I'm not sure it was the Band he was talking about, I think an Lp was being discussed? Can't remember off-hand which interview though
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    ^ Found it, your old post:

    http://crosstowntorrents.org/showthr...=blonde+blonde

    Monday 6 February 1967
    UK
    WEST ONE (The Polytechnic, London student paper)

    On Bob Dylan
    Jimi: “I saw him one time but both of us were stoned out of our minds. I remember it vaguely. It was at this place called ‘The Kettle of Fish’ in the Village. We were both stoned there and we just hung around laughing - yeah, we just laughed. People have always got to put him down, I really dig him though. I like that ‘Highway 61 Revisited’ album and especially ‘Just Like Tom Thumbs Blues’. He doesn’t inspire me actually because I could never write the kind of words he does, but he’s helped me out in trying to write ‘cause I got a thousand songs that will never be finished. I just lie around and write two or three words but now I have a little more confidence in trying to finish one. When I was down in ‘The Village’ Dylan was starving down there, I hear he used to have a pad with him all the time to put down what he sees around him. But he doesn’t have to be stoned when he writes although he probably is a cat like that… I’d like to play some sessions behind Dylan, his group ought to be a little more creative.

    Seems he's referring to Dylan's recordings in general. Actually, The Hawks - later The Band - played on very few Dylan studio recordings released in the 60's - the "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window" 45 is an example; though Robbie Robertson played on Blonde On Blonde.

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    hmmm, ... is it possible Dylan may have had a say-so on how 'creative' his support could be? I think Hendrix was simply expressing his desire that the musicianship behind Dylan be more explorative. Hendrix obviously had the visionary gift of interpretation of the most fundamental of tunes, culminating in the landmark version of Dylan's AATW - a 'creative' accomplishment by which all can agree is THE standard one can measure by.

    "Watch Out For Your Ears!"

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    Quote Originally Posted by MourningStar View Post
    hmmm, ... is it possible Dylan may have had a say-so on how 'creative' his support could be? I think Hendrix was simply expressing his desire that the musicianship behind Dylan be more explorative. Hendrix obviously had the visionary gift of interpretation of the most fundamental of tunes, culminating in the landmark version of Dylan's AATW - a 'creative' accomplishment by which all can agree is THE standard one can measure by.

    Dylan was also held down by his "folk" image (and fans) preventing him for being too "creative". Obviously, even though Dylan went electric, it sure wasn't enough for Hendrix.

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    Quote Originally Posted by dino77 View Post
    ^ Found it, your old post:

    http://crosstowntorrents.org/showthr...=blonde+blonde

    Monday 6 February 1967
    UK
    WEST ONE (The Polytechnic, London student paper)

    On Bob Dylan
    Jimi: “I saw him one time but both of us were stoned out of our minds. I remember it vaguely. It was at this place called ‘The Kettle of Fish’ in the Village. We were both stoned there and we just hung around laughing - yeah, we just laughed. People have always got to put him down, I really dig him though. I like that ‘Highway 61 Revisited’ album and especially ‘Just Like Tom Thumbs Blues’. He doesn’t inspire me actually because I could never write the kind of words he does, but he’s helped me out in trying to write ‘cause I got a thousand songs that will never be finished. I just lie around and write two or three words but now I have a little more confidence in trying to finish one. When I was down in ‘The Village’ Dylan was starving down there, I hear he used to have a pad with him all the time to put down what he sees around him. But he doesn’t have to be stoned when he writes although he probably is a cat like that… I’d like to play some sessions behind Dylan, his group ought to be a little more creative.

    Seems he's referring to Dylan's recordings in general. Actually, The Hawks - later The Band - played on very few Dylan studio recordings released in the 60's - the "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window" 45 is an example; though Robbie Robertson played on Blonde On Blonde.
    Thanks for that. I don't recall reading this.

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    “One night we were playing the Whisky, and when we were in the dressing room this really well-dressed black man wearing a hat with a feather in it walks in and says to Clarence, ‘Are you Clarence White?’ And Clarence says, ‘Yeah.” And the fellow adds, ‘Well, I really love the way you play guitar. I’ve been listening to you for years and you’re one of my favorite players.’ So Clarence says, ‘Wow. Thanks a lot. What did you say your name was?’ The fellow says, ‘I’m Jimi Hendrix.’”
    –Gene Parsons to Rick Petreysik, “Echoes of a Country Rock Legend,” Guitar Player, September 1992, p. 84

    http://www.adioslounge.com/clarence-...s-1970-part-8/

    Sid Griffin: Hendrix was a big fan of Clarence White and Hendrix used to go see The Byrds, not so much to hang out with McGuinn, it was his buddy and all that and he liked the psychedelic breaks McGuinn did on the 12-string, but really it was to see Clarence White. And Hendrix was a big Clarence White fan. He would come backstage and hang out with Clarence and give him a hug and shake his hand and tell him how amazing he was. It?s been documented many times.

    http://www.prx.org/pieces/13985/transcripts/13985
    Last edited by Ezy Rider; 12-30-13 at 04:10 PM.

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    I recall someone asking Jimi about the Band in an interview, said interviewer really liked them and said something like they really take you to a different place, Jimi's comment was along the lines of "well, they take you to where they want to go", and that he didn't like the way they played their songs the same way at every show.

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    Thanks for the link to Bo's Bounce, never heard that before. Sure sounds like an early influence for Voodoo Child to me. The beginning part, with the bouncy guitar? Kind of like the intro to VC. The riffs played afterwards, also kind of close. I think you're on to something there.

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    Quote Originally Posted by MP View Post
    I recall someone asking Jimi about the Band in an interview, said interviewer really liked them and said something like they really take you to a different place, Jimi's comment was along the lines of "well, they take you to where they want to go", and that he didn't like the way they played their songs the same way at every show.
    Hi MP - it's from the John Burks Rolling Stone interview:

    "Interestingly, while Hendrix retains his fondness for Dylan-including Nashville Skyline, from which Jimi intends to record "that one about the drifter" — none of the Experience are especially admiring of the Band. Hendrix allowed as how the Band definitely have it together enough to take you on their trip, if that's where you want to go. Mitch Mitchell asked with a small smile if the Band didn't all have pipes and mustaches."

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    As for Howlin Wolf, who was mentioned here, I would like to add his great guitarist Hubert Sumlin.
    And what about the great Earl Hooker ? Not well known, since he was a sideman and mostly did instrumentals on his own, but, I think his playing or at least experimenting might have influenced Jimi.

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    Ezy Rider feels that JH lifted a riff from Bloomfield's East West for his version of Albert Collins' Thaw Out?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ezy Rider View Post
    Albert Collin's Thaw Out is usually given as the inspiration for Driving South, but Paul Butterfield's, or rather Mike Bloomfield's guitar playing on East West was also a part that he integrated into Driving South.
    You sure Bloomfield didn't get the riff from Thaw Out?
    Last edited by stplsd; 08-30-17 at 12:05 AM.
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    JIMI HENDRIX’ PICK OF THE POPS

    Hopefully a more representative guide to what may have been some of the recorded influences on Jimi, rather than the recent release ‘Jimi Hendrix’s Juke Box’ (Chrome Dreams CD5016). He played and/or talked about most of these songs, the others are those remembered by close associates as being played or at least regularly listened to/commented on favourably, by him.
    Most of the songs listed here were, if not a number 1 (Billboard R&B or Pop chart in the USA), were at least a ‘top ten’ hit and often a best seller of that particular year.

    Jimi: “But, like, we’-we’re tryin’ to cover, you know. Just like anybody who’s, who’s hungry, you know what I mean by that - is young and want’s to do this and that - you know, and wants to get into music, so anybody like that, they got to go into so many different bags, and they got to, so much to be influenced by so many different things, the whole World, hmm.”

    Note: Regarding the Curtis Knight ‘Live’ songs, artificially created ‘live’ songs were a common ploy in the mid sixties, both Chuck Berry (At least one LP [while he was in jail] and The Rolling Stones (Got Live If You Want It) amongst others had this done to some of their studio recordings as well as a several by others that are included here. Jimi also did this himself later (post Curtis Knight releases - possibly in reaction to these? I don’t think so) but in these cases the overdubs were an integral and sometimes obviously partly written and rehearsed part of the recording – eg on Hear My Train A Comin’ (BBC 1967) My Friend (1968) and Voodoo Chile (1968). Curtis mentions, in an interview, that an attraction for Jimi signing with Ed Chalpin was that Jimmy could use Chalpin’s studio, and Curtis’ presence on several of these recordings is at most, if at all, minimal.
    Eddie Kramer also mentioned that Jimi was quite knowledgeable behind the desk, Jimi talked frequently about the mix and cutting of discs, later getting involved in the final mastering and cutting at Sterling Sound. He not only produced and helped mix his own music but also that of several other groups.
    Ed Chalpin bought the familiar studio tapes recorded at the Allegro studio from Jerry Simon’s RSVP Records, but there has been no mention of his buying any other tapes. So it does suggest that these songs were probably recorded at Studio 76. The name “The Squires” in 1965-66 could mean (apart from Hendrix) a combination of any of the following: Nate Edwards (keyboards); Napoleon (aka Hank) Anderson (bass); Marion Booker (drums); Lonnie Youngblood (Sax’ & vocals) Harry Jensen (lead, rhythm & bass guitars); Ace Hall (bass); Ditto Edwards (drums); George Bragg (drums and possibly others, also an alternative name “The Lovelights” is used in two of the dubbed “live” intro’s, although it appears there is no other evidence of this name being used. Looks very much like it was Jimi’s & Curtis’ band using Curtis’ “name” as a familiar “draw”, until. . . Similar to several other ‘acts’ ie Steve Winwood in the later ‘Spencer Davis group’ ie in reality Steve was the ‘star’ and creative force.
    Jimmy’s claimed early girlfriend (so she says) Carmen Goudy claims the first song he learnt to play on his new electric guitar was “Tall Cool One” by The Wailers (although this may seem unlikely, Jimi was loyal and always one to champion underdog contenders). Al Hendrix in his book remembers the Coasters songs “Charlie Brown” and “Poison Ivy” as well as “Yakety Yak” being played and also “At The Hop” by Danny & the Juniors. Other songs remembered by bandmates are “Wishing Well”? by [artist?] “New Dance”? by [artist?] and “Candido”? by [artist?] and an unspecified song or songs by The Big Bopper

    001. Theme from Dragnet – TV show 1951
    Jimi was a big fan of ‘the box’ all his life, as testified by himself and others. In Tulsa 1970 (after the police had arrived on stage) he played a snippet from this just prior to – sarcastically – encouraging the audience: “You really have to give them a hand. I want to hear it for Oklahoma police department, come on now!”

    002. Theme from The Green Hornet radio show – 1936
    This is basically Rimsky Korsakov’s ‘Flight Of The Bumble Bee’, but with some added wacky Theramin (Captain Beefheart notably used this instrument on his debut, 1967, Safe As Milk LP. Which notably parodied the US cover and title of Are You Experienced).
    Jimi appears to have been a fan of The Green Hornet (as well as other ‘crime-busters’ and ‘super heroes’) to judge by his alternate titles and music for a 1966 “Curtis Knight & the Squires” single (both sides credited to him and neither of which appears to feature Knight “Hornet’s Nest” (formerly “Kato’s Special”. Kato was, of course, The Green Hornet’s side-kick) He also quotes this theme during “Lover Man” a couple of times

    003. Dooji Wooji – ‘Duke’ Ellington 1940
    This is the basis for the ‘Jam/(Jelly) 292’ studio takes with an pianist Sharon Layne and an unknown trumpeter (wiped), Jimi also opens ‘The Things I Used To Do’ session (recorded very close to that recording date) with this..

    004. Holiday For Strings — David Rose 1944
    First noticed by ‘idiooti’, I think?
    Recorded at Isle of Wight and somewhere else, I can’t remember.

    004. Mother Earth – ‘Memphis Slim’ 1950
    This was - ominously - one of the two songs Jimi played on during his last performance - two nights before he died – at a jam with (Eric Burdon &) ’War’ in Ronnie Scott’s club in London.

    005. Bad, Bad Whiskey – Amos Milburn 1950
    Sammy Drain (claims ro be an early ‘friend’) says Jimmy used to play this for his mother when he visited. The first of several drink related hit songs by this Texan.

    006 Rollin’ And Tumblin’ – ‘Muddy Waters’ 1950
    Muddy’s hit version of Hambone Willie Newbern’s original. Subsequently covered by many other artists.
    This was used for the 1st verse in Butterfield’s ‘Two Trains Running’ (see entry below) and the last verse of Jimi’s version of that, titled ‘Catfish Blues’.

    007. Rollin’ Stone – ‘Muddy Waters’ 1950
    This song is highly derivative of several earlier songs (some using ‘Catfish’ in the title, others not) by different artists as are a lot of “original” “Blues” songs, Butterfield lifted the first two verses of this, verbatim, for his ‘Two Trains Running’ (see entry below) which Jimi re-arranged for his ‘Catfish Blues’ – which he occasionally mentioned on stage as being ‘Slightly Muddy Waters’ or something in a similar vein. Jimi: “[…] I was digging everything […] all the way round to Muddy Waters [...]”

    008. Still A Fool – ‘Muddy Waters’ 1951
    Jimi lifted the first verse of this, verbatim, for an additional third verse on a couple of versions of his ‘Catfish Blues’ see above.

    009. The Train Kept On A Rollin’ – ‘Tiny’ Bradshaw 1951
    An unknown woman, “Sunshine”, sings the chorus from this between Message To Love and Power Of Soul during Jimi’s ‘Earth versus Space’ jam at the ‘Newport 69’ festival. This song was featured on the Yardbirds 1965 US LP Rave Up, featuring lead guitar by Jeff Beck

    010. Hound Dog – ‘Big Mama’ Thornton 1953
    A #1 (R&B) hit. The barking and howling on the JHE appearance on BBC’s 15th October ’67 ‘Top Gear‘ show would appear to be a fun tribute to this, the original version.

    011. I’m Your Hoochie Coochie Man – ‘Muddy Waters’ 1954
    A #3 (R&B) hit. A famous Hoodoo song, which Jimmy sang before and after “becoming a ‘Voodoo chile’”. Voodoo and Hoodoo are closely related.

    012. Things That I Used To Do – ‘Guitar Slim’ 1954
    A #1 (R&B) hit for this New Orleans artist. Remembered by Jimmy’s Seattle bandmates as being an influence. Jimi recorded several takes of this with Johnny Winter – on slide guitar, Stephen Stills – guitar, Billy Cox – bass & Dallas Taylor – drums, April 1969

    013. Space Guitar – Johnny ‘Guitar’ Watson 1954
    This is so obviously an influence especially on Jimi’s “talking” guitar. (Thanks to “purplejim” for this major insight.)

    014. Jealousy - Francesco “Frankie Laine” LoVecchio 1955
    Frankie was a versatile Italian-American singer influenced by R&B music - we have been told? Although he’s most remembered for his Western songs. Jimmy used the first half of this tango for his fun song ‘Catastrophe’ in 1970

    015. Memories Are Made Of This – Dino “Dean Martin” Crocetti 1955
    According to Hendrix’ early friend James Williams they listened to quite a few pop ballads by various artists, to which Hendrix would accompany Williams on his acoustic as James sang, and that this Italian-American’s, was one of Hendrix’ favourite songs that year

    016. I’m A Man – ‘Bo Diddley’ 1955
    A #1 (R&B) hit, a double ‘A’ sided single b/w Bo Diddley (Checker 814)
    Bo’s songs are remembered by Jimmy’s Seattle band mates as being part of their repertoire. Jimmy also had himself photographed for his girlfriend Betty Jean Morgan, in his army barracks wearing a ‘loud’ loose fitting shirt and in a wild pose with his red guitar ‘Betty Jean’, next to a prominently displayed LP cover of ‘Bo Diddley Is A Gunslinger’ – an appropriate title for his present circumstances, and Bo really romanticised Jimi’s chosen profession - “R&B” guitarist/singer (or was that guitar slinger) / songwriter, innovator - with this title. It must have been a powerful impression on Jimmy that one of the two reigning “Blues” kings at Chess and one of Jimmy’s hero’s - Muddy Waters had released a very close “answer” version of this song (same music), in humorous put-down fashion, thereby acknowledging the importance of Bo’s individual style.
    Also a hit for The Yardbirds in the USA in 1965
    Jimmy also recorded two versions of this with some additional lyrics from Muddy’s ‘Manish Boy’ version, with Jimmy (vocal) and “The Squires” [Curtis Knight’s involvement??](probably at Studio 76 in early 1966) One of these has no less than three added verses (including the “Two Old Maids” refrain from his later “Two Old Maids”), written by either Jimmy or persons unknown. Quite possibly an early songwriting attempt by him?
    He also recorded multiple takes of this Bo/Muddy lyric mix at the Record Plant with Buddy & Billy on April 22 1969 and in August ’69 at the house in Boiceville with Gypsy Sun & Rainbows

    017. Bo Diddley – ‘Bo Diddley’ 1955
    Jimmy used the first verse from this as the basis for his hybrid with ‘Hey Bo Diddley’ & ‘Hush Your Mouth’. Recorded with Jimmy (vocal) and “The Squires” [Curtis Knight’s involvement??] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    018. Manish [sic] Boy – ‘Muddy Waters’ 1955
    A hit for Muddy. [See 015, ‘I’m A Man’]. He takes Bo’s original and adds some new lyrics to, humorously, put the ‘new kid’ at Chess in his place, letting him know that Muddy is the “M. A. child [you are] N. that relevent me [ie the MAN]” he then spells it out “No B. O. [Bo] [you are a] child Y” (turning Bo’s name into ‘boy’) “That spell manish boy” (ie not quite a man yet) – “But …I’m a hoochie coochie man” [title of his great ‘Hoodoo’ hit]

    019. Bring It To Jerome – ‘Bo Diddley’ 1955
    ‘B’ side of Bo Diddley’s third single. Jimi recorded himself and Paul Caruso playing this with added lyrics by Jimi, in his hotel room in 1968. (Thanks to “idiooti” for this major insight.)

    020. Every Day I Have The Blues – BB King 1955
    BB is remembered by Jimmy’s Seattle band mates as being a big influence on him. Jimmy later toured on the same bill with him on the Chitlin’ Circuit and jammed with him later in 1968. He has been recorded speaking positively about the ‘Chitlin’ circuit’, and their time on it together – a very nice, cool, entertaining, but non-bullshitting guy (sadly a rare quality in the the R&B aquaintances of Jimi during this period). Terry Johnson remembers this song as being one they played.

    021. Hey, Bo Diddley – ‘Bo Diddley’ 1956
    Jimmy used the chorus from this for his hybrid along with ‘Bo Diddley’ & ‘Hush Your Mouth’. Recorded by Jimmy vocal and “The Squires” [Curtis Knight’s involvement??] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    022. Heartbreak Hotel - Elvis Presley 1956
    Young Jimmy was an early fan of Elvis and had seen him perform in Seattle – see his portrait of Elvis surrounded by song titles - reportedly the set Elvis played at this concert, it does tally with unconnected witnesses recollections. Jimi sings the first verse of this as a parody of Elvis’ vocal style (just one example of the many voices/parodies Jimi used for comic effect) before the start of the Blue Suede Shoes jam on 23 January 1970 with the Band Of Gypsy’s. In an interview from the 1973 Film About Jimi Hendrix his close, 1st cousin, Diane Hendrix says, “We were all listening to Elvis”

    023. Long Tall Sally – Little Richard 1956
    Jimmy’s cousin Bob (Diane’s brother) remembers Jimi’s liking for Little Richard’s 45s. Terry Johnson remembers Richard’s songs being a regular feature of the bands Jimmy played with, naming this and several others.

    024. Slippin’ And Slidin’ - Little Richard 1956
    Another remembered by Terry Johnson - the flip side of Long Tall Sally

    025. Blue Suede Shoes – Elvis Presley 1956
    This doesn’t differ significantly from the original Carl Perkins hit, but seems to be the version that inspired Jimi. He played a version of this with a very different musical arrangement, and improvised additional lyrics on 23 January 1970 with the Band Of Gypsy’s. He later recorded a version, musically similar to that BOG’s one, during the rehearsal for the Berkeley concerts in May 1970

    026. Honky Tonk (Pt1 & 2) - Bill Doggett 1956
    This is remembered by band-mates Terry Johnson and Pernell Alexander as being the Velvetones signature tune and that it featured Jimmy. Jimi: “When I first started I was digging everything from Billy Butler, who was playing with Bill Doggett […]” Bill’s ‘Pony Walk’ is also mentioned by Bill Eisminger as being a song they featured. (A lot of Bills in there)

    027. Hound Dog – Elvis Presley 1956
    Remembered by Jimmy’s cousin Bob as being a favourite. JHE recorded this for the BBC in 1967; during their rehearsal for the Albert Hall on 24 February 1969 and he was also filmed singing it in his flat with friends in London in February 1969

    028. Sweet Little Angel – ‘BB’ King 1956
    A song that is heavily derivative of earlier ‘blues’ songs by different artists, especially Robert Nighthawk’s ‘Black Angel Blues’. This also features on BB’s famous1964LP ‘Live At The Regal’. Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    029. Blueberry Hill - Fats Domino 1956
    Fat’s Domino is another regularly featured artist remembered by Terry Johnson, naming this and several others. Tony Glover: “Does it bother you when an audience rushes the stage?” Jimi: “No, man. I used to do it for Fats Domino. And I wasn't about to sit down
    just because somebody told me to!”

    030. Blue Moon – Elvis Presley 1956
    Jimi quoted this along with ‘Strangers In The Night’ during the solo on Wild Thing, at least a couple of times.

    031. Love Is Strange - Mickey and Sylvia 1957
    Co-written by Jimmy’s early hero Bo Diddley! Another remembered by Terry Johnson. The original features very advanced electric guitar for it’s day.

    032. Rock and Roll Music - Chuck Berry 1957
    Another remembered by Terry Johnson, Lester Exkcano also remembers Chuck being one of Jimmy’s favourites.

    033. CC Rider - Chuck Willis 1957
    Another remembered by Terry Johnson

    034. Louie Louie – Richard Berry – 1957
    This is the original, which Jimmy’s band mates said was what they based their versions on. A big North West local hit when covered by the Kingsmen, and main contender for Washington’s official ‘state song’.
    According to Jimi’s bandmates you couldn’t get on a Seattle stage at that time unless you could play this. Based on a Latino song.

    035. Farther Up The Road - Bobby ‘Blue’ Bland 1957
    At least one of Bland’s songs is remembered by Jimi’s Seattle band mates as being part of their repertoire. And a close family connection is claimed by one of Jimi’s friends. This features Bland’s most excellent guitarist at the time, bizarrely named (Auburn) “Pat” Hare. Obvious why he ditched his first name! What were they thinking!
    JHE [II] recorded a ‘casual’ version of this in 1970

    036. It Hurts Me Too - Elmore James 1957
    Jimmy’s Harlem girlfriend Faye Pridgon: “Elmore James was his favourite,
    He would try and waver his voice like Elmo did” [...] “It Hurts Me Too was a favourite”

    037. Lucille - Little Richard 1957
    Another remembered by Terry Johnson. Noel also remembers this as one of the songs they jammed on at Mike Jeffery’s Sgt Pepper’s club in Majorca. Jimi’s musical notation on some unrecorded lyrics: “Train Beat” may well be a reference to this unique locomotive beat - the opener for some of Richard’s few recorded shows. Around this time Jimi also wrote lyrics to another unrecorded song variously titled titled ‘Locomotion’/ ‘Local Commotion’. LR: KING of ROCK & ROLL!

    038. Blue Monday - Fats Domino 1957
    Another remembered by Terry Johnson.

    039. I'm a King Bee - Slim Harpo 1957
    According to Jimi he played some gigs with Harpo. He also teased Mitch Mitchel by introducing him occasionally as “Queen Bee”. Incidentaly, when Jimi was hanging out down in the ‘Village’, in 1965, there was a very popular club band called ‘the King Bees’, who prominently featured ‘Hang On Sloopy’ and ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction’ in their show. Also covered by the Rolling Stones in 1964

    040. Hush Your Mouth - Bo Diddley 1957
    Jimmy used this for the larger part of his hybrid with ‘Bo Diddley’ & ‘Hey Bo Diddley’.
    Recorded with Jimmy (vocal) and “The Squires” [Curtis Knight’s involvement??] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    041. Lonely Avenue – Ray Charles 1957
    Covered by Jimi with, Buddy – dms & [unknown] – congas in November 1969

    042. Mary Ann – Ray Charles 1957
    This is the basis of the music to Jimi’s ‘Power Of Soul’

    043. La Bamba - Ritchie Valens 1958
    A Latino hit. Remembered by band-mates as being a favourite. Al also remembers Jimmy playing this to him at home.
    JH: “...and then I started-uh listening to a lot of Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Elmore James records, you know. Oh, but then I was listenin’ to the other records too, like Richie Valens-uh, uh, you know, Eddie Cochrane, mainly, you know, ‘Summertime Blues’ and ‘Come On Everybody’ an’ so forth and so on.

    044. Summertime Blues - Eddie Cochran 1958
    Remembered by Jimi’s Seattle band mates as being part of their repertoire. JHE played this at their ‘farewell concert’ at The Saville Theatre before they left London for the Monterey Pop festival. Jimi: “[…] I was digging everything […] all the way round to [..] Eddie Cochran.” Notably also a favourite of The Who’s stage show when Jimi was first in London.

    045. Johnny B. Goode - Chuck Berry 1958
    Remembered by Jimi’s Seattle band mates as being part of their repertoire.
    Jimi played this occasionally throughout his career. JHE [II] recorded his famous version of this during the 1st show at Berkeley May 1970

    046. Rockin Pneumonia & the Boogie Woogie Flu - Huey ‘Piano’ Smith & the Clowns 1958
    Another remembered by Terry Johnson, although he confuses the artist with the much later Johnny Rivers version - also a hit.

    047. Rebel Rouser - Duane Eddy 1958
    Remembered by Hendrix’ friend James Williams as being one of the first songs that Hendrix learnt on his first electric guitar, also remembered by Pernell Alexander.

    048. The Twist - Hank Ballard & the Midnighters 1958
    Remembered by band mates as being the version of this song that they featured.

    049. One Night - Elvis Presley 1958
    A hit for New Orleans artist ‘Smiley’ Lewis in 1956 and also later for Elvis. The (rather weak) Elvis version was also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    050. Key To The Highway - Little Walter 1958
    Jimi plays some music from this much recorded song (originally by Charles Segar) during the infamously lack lustre Mike Ephron jams at the house in Boiceville, August 1969. Jimi appears to have been quite enthusiastic about this dirge like session, playing bits of it to several journalists with enthusiastic remarks (hopefully he was taking the piss[IMG]file:///C:\DOCUME~1\ren\LOCALS~1\Temp\msohtml1\01\clip_ima ge002.gif[/IMG]

    051. Rumble - Link Wray & The Ray Men 1958
    Jimi recorded a brief touch of this at the house in Boiceville, August 1969

    052. Rockin’ Robin - Bobby Day 1958
    Remembered by band mates as being a song they featured.


    053. The Stroll - The Diamonds 1958
    Remembered by band mates as being a song they featured.

    054. Willie And the Hand Jive - Johnny Otis Show 1958
    Remembered by band mates as being a song they featured.

    055. Yakety Yak - Coasters 1958
    In his 1969 interview for Canadian television he mentions that he “used to play songs by the Coasters and groups like that” This is a Coasters song that former bandmate Fred Rollins and others remember as being part of their repertoire.

    056. Do You Wanna Dance - Bobby Freeman 1958
    Remembered by band mates as being a song they featured.

    057. Ramrod - Duane Eddy 1958
    Remembered by band-mates as being a favourite of Jimmy’s

    058. Good Golly Miss Molly - Little Richard 1958
    Remembered by band mates as being a song they featured.

    059. Little Queenie - Chuck Berry 1958
    Remembered by band mates as being a song they featured.

    060. C'mon Everybody - Eddie Cochran 1958
    JH:. . .and then I started-uh listening to a lot of Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Elmore James records, you know. Oh, but then I was listenin’ to the other records too, like Richie Valens-uh, uh, you know, Eddie Cochrane, mainly, you know, ‘Summertime Blues’ and ‘Come On Everybody’ an’ so forth and so on.

    061. Bonanza - TV Theme 1959
    The guitarist on this is session man Tommy Tedesco “The most recorded guitarist in history”. Jimi quoted the guitar solo from this during The Star Spangled Banner twice in the October concerts at the Winterland

    062. Battle of New Orleans - Johnny Horton 1959
    Two of Jimmy’s bandmates, separately, remember him going out on stage and playing this solo (sarcastically), while the rest of them were backstage, arguing about what to play.

    063. Rockin' Crickets - Hot Toddy's 1959
    Remembered by James Williams and bandmate Fred Rollins as being a song by this Canadian band that they featured and that it was a favourite of Jimmy’s. Jimi wasalwaysloyal to Canada, as he was to anyone/group/team etc. that he felt he had even the slightest connection to, (many times in interviews he would favourably mention fellow Reprise & Track label mates/former musical associates, regardless of their musical styles & also comedians) as well as ‘underdog’ teams/musicians/natives that he felt were unfairly treated, and might just ‘make it’. He never crowed for the ‘champions’.

    064. I’m A Hog For You Baby – The Coasters
    Larry Lee remembered this as being a song they played at the Del Morocco

    065. The Big Hurt - Miss Toni Fisher 1959
    In an interview Jimi talked about the phasing effect on this record (the only use of it prior to ‘Itchycoo Park’ by The Small Faces?) and how advanced their use of this soud effect was for it’s time.

    066. The Breeze And I - Santo & Johnny 1959
    Jimi quotes from this during Spanish Castle Magic at the Atlanta festival and during Machine Gun at the Berlin Super Concert ’70. Many others recorded versions around this time and later, but these two were a unique (Latino) teen, electric guitar group with a strange electric sound, were very popular and appeared on TV. The most likely choice given Jimi’s noted tastes. A possible reference to his parachuting days?

    067. Personality - Lloyd Price 1959
    Another song by Lloyd remembered by a bandmate.

    068. Forty Miles Of Bad Road - Duane Eddy 1959
    Remembered by early friend Jimmy Williams as being one of the songs that Jimmy mastered on his first electric guitar.

    069. There Is Something On Your Mind - Big J McNeely 1959
    The most famous at the time – although little remembered - sax player in Rock and Roll. Known for his wild playing, on-stage antics and fluorescent painted sax’s. His last and biggest hit, covered by Albert King amongst many others. King Curtis also performed the song, a live recording from 1966 appears on the LP ‘Live At Small’s Paradise’ [no Hendrix], recorded the same year that Hendrix was a member of Curtis’ backing band the Kingpins, so Jimmy quite likely played this song with King Curtis. It’s also worth remembering that in most early R&B/Rock & Roll songs that the lead/solo was played on a saxophone, the guitar mainly playing rhythm, and that Jimi often referred to his (‘Public Address’ – P.A. amplified) guitar (jazz instrument - ‘axe’) as his “Public S[ax]ophone”. Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (Lonnie Youngblood s[ax]) (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966) [note ‘axe’ (hence ‘chops’) became slang for a lead instrument from S[ax]ophone, especially guitar, which previously, usually, only played rhythm, but later when electrically amplified [PA – Public (Adress)] began to take on the lead role formerly held by (unamplified at the time) sax.]

    070. Machine Gun - The Riptides 1959
    Surfin’ machine gun! Not mentioned by anyone, but interesting similarities - title, snare etc. “And you’ll never hear surf music again ha-ha-ha”…

    071. Everything Gonna Be Alright – Little Walter 1959
    Jimi jammed on this three times in 1968 – only a month previous from the first, Little Walter had died of his injuries following a “street fight” in Chicago (an ironic tribute?) – Once during the infamous jam with Jim Morrison at the Scene club, later with Jack Bruce and John McLaughlin, and?

    072. Stagger Lee - Chuck Willis 1959
    Remembered by band-mates as being a song they featured.

    073. Baby What You Want Me To Do - Jimmy Reed 1959
    Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    074. What'd I Say (Pt1 & 2) - Ray Charles 1959
    Charles’ original features dubbed “live audience” on (Pt 2). Remembered by Jimmy’s Seattle band mates as being part of their repertoire (and every other band’s in Seattle at that time) also recorded by Jimmy (vocal [with humorously improvised lyrics]) and “The Squires” [Curtis Knight’s involvement?] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    075. Money (That’s What I Want) - Barret Strong 1959
    Also covered by the Beatles on their hit LP ‘With The Beatles’ in 1963. Remembered by Jimmy’s Seattle band mates as being part of their repertoire. Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    076. Just A Little Bit - Rosco [sic] Gordon 1960
    Rosco was one of Sam Philips (Sun Studios) ‘discoveries’ along with Howlin’ Wolf, BB King, Carl Perkins, Elvis, Johnny Cash etc. Rosco’s unusual style was a major factor in the creation of Ska (the precursor of Reggae) in Jamaica, where he was very popular. This
    was also a hit for Roy Head and The Traits in 1965
    Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    077. The Sky Is Crying – Elmore James 1960
    Faye Pridgon: “The Sky Is Crying was his favourite”. Buddy sang lyrics from this during Jimi’s ‘Earth versus Space’ [ie Buddy vs Jimi] jam at the Newport 69 festival

    078. Come On (Part 1) - Earl ‘King’ 1960
    A hit from this New Orleans artist. Remembered by Jimi’s Seattle band mates as being part of their repertoire. Also recorded as an instrumental with much shouting from Jimi among others with “The Squires” [Curtis Knight’s involvement?? Not mentioned in the band call!] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966). More famously JHE recorded a faster vocal version for Electric Ladyland in 1968

    079. Peter Gunn – Duane Eddy 1960
    Remembered by Jimmy’s Seattle band mates as being part of their repertoire. Jimi recorded a close version of this in 1970

    080. Let’s Go, Let’s Go, Let’s Go - Hank Ballard & The Midnighters 1960
    Remembered by Jimmy’s Seattle band mates as being part of their repertoire. Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966). It has also been claimed that Jimi joined Ballard’s band in 1963 for a brief spell.

    081. Walking to New Orleans - Fats Domino 1960
    Remembered by Terry Johnson as being a song they featured.

    082. Cathy's Clown - Everly Brothers 1960
    Remembered by bandmate Fred Rollins as being a song they featured and that it was a favourite of Jimmy’s. Jimi & Mitch also went to see them in concert in 1968, and Jimi jammed with Phil on another occasion

    083. Cherry Pie – Skip & Flip 1960
    In an interview Billy Cox talked about jamming with Jimi around the prominent bass pattern from this. Skip Battin was later the bass player with The Byrds for a time

    084. Finger Poppin’ Time - Hank Ballard & The Midnighters May 1960
    Remembered by bandmates. It has been claimed that Jimmy toured in Ballard’s band in 1963.

    085. Look On Yonder Wall - Elmore James 1961
    According to Lonnie Youngblood, Elmo was a major influence on Jimmy and that he used the surname James as a tribute to him (as in ‘Maurice James’ & later ‘Jimmy James’). Jimi was also photographed in early 1967 in London posing with the UK LP ‘The Very Best Of Elmore James’ (Sue Records). This appears to be the source of much of Willie Dixon’s “Down In The Bottom” (63) which in turn, along with Elmo sounds like the ‘inspiration’ for the lyric of Jimi’s ‘Lover Man’.

    086. My Own Fault, Baby - ‘BB’ King 1961
    Jimi’s Seattle band mates remembered BB King as being a big influence on him. Recorded during a jam with BB King in the Generation club in 1968, Jimi can only be heard on this near the end.

    087. Driving Wheel – BB King 1961
    BB is remembered by Jimmy’s Seattle band mates as being a big influence on him. Terry Johnson remembers ‘Driving Wheel’ as being one they played. Originally recorded by Roosevelt Sykes, it became a big hit for Junior Parker, subsequently recorded by many other artists. Electric Flag with Bloomfield featured this.

    088. Bright Lights, Big City - Jimmy Reed 1961
    Also recorded by Jimmy (imitating Reed on vocal) and “The Squires” [Curtis Knight’s involvement??] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966) Jimi also recorded himself playing guitar accompaniment to Mr Wiggles [most probably?] singing this, with Paul Caruso on harmonica at a party in his hotel, in 1968.

    089. Stand By Me - Ben E King 1961
    Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    090. Gypsy Woman - The Impressions 1961
    Jimmy once toured with The Impressions and reportedly broke Curtis’ guitar amp before he got on stage. Gypsy Sun & Rainbows recorded this as a medley with ‘Aware Of Love’ at the Woodstock festival with Larry Lee on vocal

    091. San Ho-Zay – Freddie King 1961
    Billy Cox played (prominently) in the studio band that backed Freddie on his several TV performances for ‘The Beat!!!’ show. Jimi based a jam around this, with Al Kooper and some of Paul Butterfield’s band, at the Generation Club, in April 1968

    092. If You Gotta Make A Fool Of Somebody – James Ray 1961
    A top ten hit for Ray in 1962, then covered by The Beatles, it became a UK hit for Freddie & the Dreamers in 1963. Maxine Brown released a version in 1965(Wand ), entering the Billboard chart in December, reaching #63. Wand records was in the same 1560 Broadway building as Chalpin’s P.P. X. Enterpises/Studio 54, Jerry Simon’s R.S.V.P. records and Allegro studios. Curtis & Jimi recorded a demo type version in 1966.
    Curtis Vocal, Jimmy, solo guitar accompaniment and backing vocal.

    093. Travellin’ To California - Albert King 1962
    Albert is remembered by Jimi’s Seattle band mates as being a big influence on him. Also recorded with Jimmy (vocal) and “The Squires” [Curtis Knight involvement?](probably at Studio 76 in early 1966. Cynically re-titled ‘California Night’ [ie ‘California/Knight’ – geddit[IMG]file:///C:\DOCUME~1\ren\LOCALS~1\Temp\msohtml1\01\clip_ima ge002.gif[/IMG]] with the royalties dishonestly caimed by Knight

    094. Down In The Bottom (Willie Dixon) – ‘Howlin’ Wolf’ 1962
    Wolf himself (not Sumlin or Rogers) plays most of the guitar on this one, which is mainly a heavy rhythm, but with some excellent slide touches. Jimi used the lyrics from this for most of his ‘Lover Man’. Another major influence: Jimmy was photographed backstage at the Café Wha? in New York in 1966, posing with his Bob Dylan hair-do & holding Howlin’ Wolf’s recently released classic 1966 Chess LP ‘The Real Folk Blues’. Sam Lay (drums) and Jerome Arnold (bass) members of Wolf’s band were lured away to join Paul Butterfield’s new band in 1965 and also provided Bob Dylan’s rhythm section for his controversial electric debut at the 1965 Newport ‘folk’ festival, Sam also played on some of the accompanied electric half of Bob’s ‘groundbreaking’ 1965 LP ‘Bringing It All Back Home’, before returning to the fold.

    095. Stranger Blues - Elmore James 1962
    The title and intro by Jimmy for “Drivin’ South” (Thaw Out) appear to come from this – Elmo : “I’m goin back down South, if I have to wear out ninety nine pair shoes”
    Jimmy: “Drivin’ South” “Get ninety nine pairs of shoes and walk the rest of the way!” Recorded by Jimmy and “The Squires” (with Curtis Knight short ad-libbed? overdubbed? bit at the beginning, followed by a list of towns in The South, so he could claim co-composer, that wasn’t enough though, he just claimed composer outright!) Again, probably recorded at Studio 76 in early 1966.

    096. Stormy Monday - Bobby Bland 1962
    Originally recorded by T-bone Walker, Little Milton also released a beautiful version of this in 1966. Jimi recorded a version during a jam session with Paul Caruso, Buddy Miles and members of Paul Butterfield’s band at the Café A Go Go in New York March 1968

    097. Ain’t Superstitious (Willie Dixon) – Howlin’ Wolf 1962
    Mick Cox the Eire Apparent’s lead guitarist remembers Jimi jamming on this with Jeff Beck at the Scene Club in NYC, a track covered on the 1969 Jeff Beck LP ‘Truth’.

    098. Twist And Shout - The Isley Brothers 1962
    #2 (R&B) #4 (Pop). Also a hit for the Beatles in 1964 #2 (Pop) their only million selling and ‘top ten’ cover song.
    The Isley’s version has quite a pronounced Latino sound. Jimmy surely played this frequently with The Isley Brothers, as he played quite a number of concerts with them. Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    099. Green Onions - Booker T & The MG's 1962
    Remembered by Billy Cox as being one of the songs that they played in the King Kasuals.

    100. Soldier Boy - Shirelles 1962
    After deciding to leave Clarksville for Indianapolis, Billy Cox says this was a song that they played in the competition there, where they came second to ‘The Imperials’, they surely played it as an instrumental or had female singers? eg the female singers photographed with them on stage at the Del Morocco? Their car broke down and they ended up going back to Clarksville. Three members of the Imperials joined the Kasuals there shortly afterwards. Bandmates remember them listening to the Shirelles and the Chantells. Then again, ‘The Beatles’ Ringo sang “Boys” by the Shirelles, which is even more odd!
    Incidentally, on Little Richard’s return to Rock & Roll TV on Granada’s UK (1964) show ‘It’s Little Richard!’ The Shirelles were notably featured as the ‘support’ - mainly dancing and clapping - and backing singers on the solitary gospel song he sang. On ‘Whole Lotta Shakin’ the Sounds Incorporated guitarst plays some excellent ‘heavy’ accompanying guitar and solo for those days. Richard also sings ‘Hound Dog’ later covered by Hendrix as well. Jimmy Saville, later a Radio One DJ, can be seen sitting in the audience and dancing with a young dark haired girl, He later introduced Jimi on the BBC’s TOTP’s twice. [After his death he was found to have abused his position at the BBC to ruthlessly prey on underaged girls]

    101. Nut Rocker [Nutcracker Marche] – ‘B. Bumble & The Stingers’ 1962
    This part of the popular Christmas ballet by Tchaikovsky, was quoted by Jimi during his solo on Stone Free with the Band Of Gypsy’s at the 2nd New Year’s show in 1969/70 These nutters got there first “Writer” of this single, and acid scenester Kim Fowley claims to have been an aquaintance of Jimi’s in 1966-67 London, telling the occasional, exaggerated anecdote, over the years.

    102. Soul Twist - King Curtis & His Noble Knights 1962
    Remembered by Billy Cox as being another of the songs that they played in the King Kasuals. Could it be possible that Curtis ‘McNair’ was influenced in the title of his group by this: Curtis Knight & The Squires/King Curtis & His Noble Knights - surely not

    103. Mockingbird - Inez & Charles Foxx 1963
    Jimi sang this (humorously) with Dusty Springfield on her UK TV show ‘It Must Be Dusty’ in 1968. It was also covered by his long term lover, Jeanette Jacobs’, band ‘The Cake’ on their debut 1968 LP

    104. Watermelon Man - Mongo Santamaria 1963
    Remembered by Billy Cox as a song the King Kasuals used to play

    105. Misty – Lloyd Price 1963
    Billy Cox, “Jimi could play ‘Misty’ in the original key”; according to Billy and several others Jimi was obviously into, or just impressed by “crooners” ie smoothie vocalists. Jimi also commented favourably on Englebert Humperdinck’s singing voice, but . . . .

    106. Walkin’ The Dog - Rufus Thomas 1963
    Faye Pridgon on Jimi playing in a Harlem club [implied: Small’s Paradise], “He did Walkin’ The Dog by Rufus Thomas, all by himself, and he really killed them, man, and from that time there was this certain crowd that really looked forward to him.” Also recorded by Jimmy (vocal) and “The Squires” (Lonnie Youngblood sax) [Any Curtis Knight involvement??] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    107. Tobacco Road – Lou Rawls 1963
    Lou also played this at the Monterey Pop festival. This was the last song that Jimi played on in public, during the jam with (Eric Burdon &) ’War’ at Ronnie Scott’s, two nights before he died. The lyrics must surely have reminded Jimi about his own troubled upbringing.

    108. You Got What It Takes - Joe Tex 1964
    Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966) Joe Tex was also admired by Bob Dylan.

    109. Bleeding Heart - Elmore James 1964
    Faye Pridgon mentions that Jimi was into this song in a big way. Jimi (vocal) recorded a version of this (unfortunately cut very short at only 1:59 mins) with “The Squires” [Any Curtis Knight involvement??] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966), a classic live version at the 24 February Albert Hall performance, a bland, straight studio version with Buddy & Billy in 1969, a very different, but awkward, studio arrangement with JHE [II] in 1970 and he also played it during the 1st of the four New Year’s concerts with The Band Of Gypsy’s

    110. Tail Dragger – ‘Howlin’ Wolf’ 1964
    Jimi sang lyrics from this during the long blues jam at the infamous ‘Morrison’ Scene club jam on 18? March 1968.

    111. Rock Me Baby – ‘BB’ King 1964
    Funky, or what? A speeded up version of this was part of JHE’s early sets, and the music from this eventually became ‘Lover Man’. Jim Morrison also butchered this during the
    infamous Scene club jam on 18? March 1968.

    112. Something You Got - Alvin Robinson 1964
    A New Orleans musician. We are told this was at the start of ‘The Popeye’ dance craze in the Crescent City. Billboard Pop #52; Cashbox R&B # 6. Maxine Brown released a duet of this with Chuck Jackson for Wand records later in 1964, Billboard Pop # 55. Also recorded by Jimmy (vocal) and “The Squires” [Any Curtis Knight involvement??](probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    113. Gloria - Them 1964
    JHE recorded a humorous version of this, featuring groupies and a dope bust, in 1968 at TTG Studios, Hollywood. Censored on the MCA Jimi Hendrix Experience 4 album set (although featuring several overt sexual references, only a small piece was removed which included the dreaded ‘F’ word) Interestingly on the 1966 Ray Sharpe (& King Curtis ) single ‘Help Me (Get The Feeling)’, that Jimi played on, the music is almost identical, only the lyrics appear different, although neither “Van” Morrison or Hendrix are credited

    114. Everybody Needs Somebody To Love - Solomon Burke 1964
    Noel Redding remembers this as one of the songs they played during rehearsals for the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Original features dubbed “live audience” who also sing some back up. Burke claims Jimmy played beautifully on this when touring with him. There is no other evidence that Jimmy toured with Burke though

    115. Hold What You’ve Got - Joe Tex 1964
    Also recorded by (with much hilarity) Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    116. I Feel Fine – The Beatles 1964
    The first record ever to feature intentional feedback guitar (by John Lennon). Jimi usually quoted this during performances of ‘Hey Joe’

    117. Mercy, Mercy – Don Covay & the Goodtimers 1964
    According to Don Covay and others, Jimmy is the lead guitartist, or alternatively the rhythm on the original, and according to Steve Cropper showed him how he played it. He also recorded a version with the “Squires” and played it as part of the early Jimi Hendrix Experience set list.

    118. What A Shame — The Rolling Stones 1964
    ‘B’ side of Heart Of Stone’ in the US. Released on 19 December. Jimi quoted lyrics from this during the blues jam at the Scene Club on 18? March 1968, and during the long Room Full Of Mirrors jam at Toronto on 3 May 1969.

    119. I Can’t Help Myself - The Four Tops 1965
    The fantastic Brenda Holloway!! backed by the King Curtis band was filmed singing this for the 1965 ABC TV special Beatles at Shea Stadium. Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) Jimmy (harmony vocal) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    120. Ain’t That Peculiar – Marvin Gaye 1965
    Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    121. Land Of A 1000 Dances – Cannibal & The Headhunters 1965
    A Latino version of this. This hit single features a dubbed “live” audience and degraded “live” sound similar to the “Curtis Knight” “live” recordings. Also recorded by Jimmy (vocal) and “The Squires” [Any Curtis Knight involvement??] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    122. Last Night - The Mar-Keys 1965
    Another of the many instrumentals covered, also recorded by “The Squires” [Any Curtis Knight involvement??] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    123. Shotgun - ‘Junior Walker’ & The All Stars 1965
    Jimmy (aka Maurice James) was filmed with members of Little Richard’s review ‘The Royal Company’ backing a song & dance duo - Buddy and Stacy (who were also part of Richard’s touring revue at this time - performing this for Nashville’s pioneering Night Train TV show in 1965. “Maurice” stands out from the rest of the band, being positioned directly to the right centre with Buddy & Stacy and using some of the the stage moves that he later used with JHE, including sweeping his elbow down the guitar neck. Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (Harry Jensen/Jimmy - lead guitar?/ rhythm guitar? that’s what the intro says, but. . .(probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    124. I Got You (I Feel Good) - James Brown 1965
    Also recorded by Lonnie Youngblood (vocal & sax) and “The Squires” [Any Curtis Knight involvement??] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    125. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction – The Rolling Stones 1965
    The Stones’ original features an early use of the fuzz box by Keith Richard. Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966) Jimi also quoted this at Randall’s Island festival and at the Isle Of Wight festival in 1970 during ‘Hey Joe’, possibly as a comment on the rubbish state of the sound system etc. Jimi aquired a rudimentary fuzz device not long after this single, apparently made by Ken Pine of the Fugs..

    126. Mr. Pitiful - Otis Redding 1965
    Also recorded by Lonnie Youngblood (vocal) and “The Squires” [Curtis Knight involvement?] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    127. In The Midnight Hour - Wilson Picket 1965
    Jimmy backed up Picket at least one time with the King Curtis band, at a hugely prestigious Atlantic records celebration gig, along with Percy Sledge and (Little) Esther Philips. Jimi & Noel also jammed on this with Stevie Wonder (on drums) at the BBC in 1967. Jimi: “Most groups wouldn’t let me do my own thing, like feedback ‘In The Midnight Hour’.” Apparently some acts allowed him the concession of playing this song with feedback at the time. Probably only the Isley Brothers though, who let him have a short solo spot.

    128. Wooly Bully - Sam The Sham & The Pharaohs 1965
    Yet another Latino hit. Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)
    Lonnie Youngblood also released his own version [no Hendrix involvement] in 1966

    129. I’ll Be Doggone - Marvin Gaye 1965
    Also recorded by Curtis Knight (vocal) and “The Squires” (Lonnie Youngblood sax) (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    130. Thaw Out - Albert Collins 1965
    Jimmy arranged his version of this and he, or quite likely Curtis (and/or Ed), re-titled it ‘Drivin’ South’ (see 089. Stranger Blues) to avoid paying royalties. Curtis unfortunately raps over the beginning of “The Squires” version, very likely a later overdub, as is the obnoxious tambourine (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)
    JHE recorded three different versions of this for the BBC in 1967, Jimi also played it in concert and used it in jams several times.

    131. Day Tripper – The Beatles December 1965
    Also recorded by Jimmy & Curtis (vocal duet) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966). During his 1967 visit to the USA Jimi recorded an instrumental jam based on this, with Ray Lucas on drums & ‘Bugs’ Gregory on bass at Studio 76, which was unfortunately later cut up by Ed Chalpin who then added dodgy overdubs by unknown musicians and vocals by Curtis. The JHE later recorded a version with vocals ( including a tribute – “Hey, Owsley can you hear me now!”) for the BBC in 1967

    132. Hang On Sloopy (originally ‘My Girl Sloopy’ by the Vibrations, 1964 Cashbox R&B # 10) – The McCoy’s 1965
    Later the “house band” at Steve Paul’s Scene Club, where Jimi jammed frequently from 1967 onwards. First released in 1964, on Atlantic, by ‘black’ R&B group the Vibrations as ‘My Girl Sloopy’ – incidentally featuring a dubbed on ‘live audience’ and with a ‘Latin’ feel. Also recorded by Jimmy & Curtis (vocal duet) and “The Squires” (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    133. Killing Floor – ‘Howlin’ Wolf’ 1965
    A song Jimi played from at least 1966 through to his last official concert, at ‘The Love & Peace Festival’ in September 1970 on the Isle of Fehmarn, West Germany. Two versions were also recorded by Jimmy (vocal) and “The Squires” [Curtis Knight later intro only?] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966) One version interestingly is in stereo, with the dubbed on “live” intro, but minus the dubbed on “live” “audience sounds”

    134. Like A Rolling Stone - ‘Bob Dylan’ 1965
    Jimmy/Jimi was a major fan of Bob. According to his then girlfriend Faye Pridgon, he once spent the last of their cash on, what was obviously, given the circumstances, his ‘Highway 61 Revisited’ LP [this has much later been wrongly confused by her with ‘Blonde On Blonde’, see London photo], which he played as loudly as possible and forced several friends to listen to. Faye, “You could hear it at 42nd Street probably, We almost got put out behind Bob Dylan”. His first label credit was on the Curtis Knight single “How Would You Feel”, as “arranged by”, the music was basically this song (Dylan was uncredited). He was also photographed in London in 1967 posing holding a Lenny Bruce LP and with the ‘Blonde On Blonde’ LP cover propped up facing the camera (which is where I feel the confusion of this title of ‘the Dylan LP’ came from I’m not saying he didn’t hear it, shortly before leaving, but he was obviously smitten well before B on B, andwhen he was actually living with her). A favourite of the JHE stage set from 1966 until 1969, although,reportedly, not recorded in the studio to Jimi’s satisfaction. Any studio recordings are missing, if indeed a studio recording was ever actually attempted.

    135. Hey Joe – Tim Rose 1966
    The song that brought Jimi to the attention of the European public, although it didn’t sell at all in the USA, the promo copy’s being more common! Jimi’s version is very close to Tim’s, uniquely slow arrangement, even down to the female backing vocals. Jimi acknowledged his debt to him on stage by dedicating it to him on at least one occasion. Hopefully Crosby’s overweening ego was severely dented on hearing Jimi’s version at Monterey. Obviously (hopefully) he had not heard the JHE single or he would have left it out! What an embarrassing moment – that is if he has ever seen it
    Obviously I love a lot of Crosby’s music though, but come on! He couldn’t possibly have heard it, surely, he obviously thought he was putting him (this unknown [to him] black punk) ‘in his place’ with their (he obviously thought) unassailably “classic” version – ha-ha-ha! Interesting that Jimi later indirectly referenced the Byrds recording of jet engines on their ‘Fifth Dimension’ LP (the choice of band name for the first psyche oriented ‘black’ [ie former ‘R&B’] group), but saying he liked to do ‘it’ [ie jet engine noises] himself just with his guitar. He was later very complimentary of CSN&Y which included Crosby - Crosby probably didn’t even notice

    136. Shapes Of Things – The Yardbirds March 1966
    Jimi: [made comments on this, I will find eventually]

    137. Wild Thing – The Troggs 1966
    The famous climax to most early JHE shows, including the notorious, incendiary end to the JHE debut USA performance at Monterey, the second and the last time he set fire to his guitar, the few other stories of him burning a guitar appear to be “mistaken”, if not just blatant fabrication.

    138. Get Out Of My Life Woman - Lee Dorsey 1965/66
    Note: This only entered the Billboard chart on 08 January 1966. Another New Orleans musician. [“A step towards ‘hip hop’” according to (the excellent) Mojo magazine]. Also recorded by Jimmy (vocal) and “The Squires” [Curtis Knight involvement?] (probably at Studio 76 in early 1966)

    139. Ain't Too Proud To Beg - The Temptations 1966
    Jimi & Noel jammed on this with Stevie Wonder (on drums) at the BBC in 1967
    Also covered much later by the Rolling Stones.

    140. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window - Bob Dylan 1966
    Bob’s ‘disappearing’ single. JHE recorded this for the BBC in 1967, and also played it live a handful of times in 1968

    141. East-West - Paul Butterfield Blues Band 1966
    Remembered by Richard Thomson of Fairport Convention (fellow Track Records artists in 1967 whom Jimi, loyally, mentioned) as a song they jammed together on in New York .
    Ezy Rider thinks that Jimi quoted part of Bloomfields intro in his version of Thaw Out, but I think Bloomfield is quoting Thaw Out! Whatever it turns out thanks are due to Ezy R for noticing this.

    142. Two Trains Running - Butterfield Blues Band 1966
    A combination of verses Muddy Waters’ ‘Rollin’ Stone ‘ and Rollin’ and Tumblin’ (no credit).
    Jimi re-arranged this, just reversing the order of the verses and adding his unique musical embellishment, for his ‘Catfish Blues’. See individual entries for above titles.

    143. Tomorrow Never Knows – The Beatles 1966
    The first recording of Jimi playing this is during the infamous blues jam at the Scene club in March 1968. Just after an extremely intoxicated Jim Morrison falls, groaning, to the floor Jimi starts to play this (ha-ha-ha, geddit?). He subsequently quoted this a couple of times during different songs at later concerts.

    144. Strangers in the Night - Frank Sinatra 1966
    Jimi often quoted this during the solo on Wild Thing. Jimi was signed to Frank’s own company Reprise Records in the USA & Canada, and was, apparently, very appreciative in his early days of ‘crooners’, regardless of ‘colour’

    145. La Poupée Qui Fait Non [“The ‘doll’ (ie ‘chick’) who says no”] – Michel Polnareff 1967
    Jimmy Page apparently played the session guitar on this.
    JHE recorded a studio instrumental version of this after hearing this major European hit while playing there in 1967.

    146. Dear Mr Fantasy – Traffic 1967
    Played at least twice by JHE in 1968, Traffic appear to have been Jimi’s favourite UK group, next to?/or more so? Cream. Steve Winwood, Dave Mason & Chris Wood all contributed to Electric Ladyland. Dave Mason, Chris Wood & Jim Capaldi (off stage left, un–mic’ed) also took part in the jam at the original JHE’s last concert on mainland England, at the Albert Hall on 24 February 1969. This jam line-up was a foretaste of the ‘Gypsy Sun & Rainbows’/ ‘Band Of Gypsys’/’Sky Church’, ie the usual trio - guitar, bass and drums - plus rhythm guitar and congas (& occasional flute)

    147. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band - The Beatles 1967
    Sometimes used as an opener after he successfully used it at the Saville in 1967 - a couple of days after it’s release, much to Paul McCartney’s delight (he was in the audience)

    148. Tales Of Brave Ulysses - Cream 1967
    In a BBC interview in 1967 Jimi said (slyly) , this was the first record that he heard the wah-wah pedal being used on, although he first heard it being used by Frank Zappa and almost immediately featured it prominently on both sides of his single Burning Of The Midnight Lamp which was released the day after the Cream single (ha-ha-ha) and later - to his severe cost – at a session with Curtis Knight at Ed Chalpin’s studio.

    149. Outside Woman Blues – Cream 1967
    Quoted several times by JHE usually during Sunshine Of Your Love - a tribute to Cream

    150. Sunshine Of Your Love – Cream 1967
    Played frequently as an instrumental, after Cream split up, (quite often with the above) as a tribute, introduced - tongue in cheek: “Not trying to say that we can play it better than them”.

    151. Born Under A Bad Sign – Albert King 1967
    Jimi recorded at least one cover by all four ‘Kings’ of the guitar. Recorded as a studio instrumental by the Band Of Gypsy’s in 1969. Cream also famously recorded a cover of this on their 1968 LP ‘Wheels Of Fire’. As well as being admired by Jimi, Albert King was also a notable ‘fan’ of Jimi’s [unlike most other R&B stalwarts who generally dissed him, with obviously made up rubbish – apart from Albert & also BB King] and recorded an excellent version of Jimi’s classic blues, ‘Red House’, before he died.

    152. Stop – Howard Tate 1967
    A notable 1968 R&B hit for singer Tate, it also entered the Billboard Pop chart. Later in 1968 Al Kooper & Mike Bloomfield used this as the basis for an instrumental jam on theirSuper Session LP. Buddy and the group stay very close to the original vocal version of the Tate recording for their three Band of Gypsy’s performances, though.

    153. Aware Of Love - The Impressions 1967
    A song from their ‘The Fabulous Impressions’ LP. The Gypsy Sun & Rainbows version recorded as the second part of a medley with Gypsy Woman at the Woodstock festival with Larry Lee on vocal. It’s quite likely a cover of the earlier, Jerry Butler (& The Impressions) version, though both are the same song written by Curtis Mayfield.

    154. Tax Free - Hansson & “Karlsson” (Carlsson) 1967
    In 1967 they were Sweden’s premier ‘psychedelic/alternative’ group. Jimi made friends with them when they jammed at Stockholm’s 1st (short lived) psychedelic venue - Klubb Filips, and when they were his support group at the Akademiksa Foreningen in Lund.
    JHE played this quite often during their 1968 & 69 concerts and recorded an excellent completed studio version in 1968, during the sessions for ‘Electrc Lady Land’, but it didn’t make the LP.

    155. All Along The Watchtower – ‘Bob Dylan’ Dec 1967
    From Dylan’s John Wesley Harding LP. One of the all time greatest cover versions of any song, Jimi really made this his own, although he appears to have been reluctant to play it at concerts and almost always fluffed the last line of the first verse lyrics. There is only one version when he sings this line clearly – San Bernardino 1970.

    156. Drifters’ Escape – ‘Bob Dylan’ 1967
    Another cover from Dylan’s John Wesley Harding LP. Jimi spent a lot of time on this very different, yet, overall - despite the numerous lead guitar takes - disappointingly awkward arrangement.

    157. Tears Of Rage – ‘Bob Dylan’ with ‘The Hawks’ (later aka ‘The Band’) 1967
    One of Bob’s many recordings with The Hawks at the ‘Big Pink’ house, circulated amongst friends in the biz, including Jimi. Jimi & Paul Caruso recorded a charmingly raw, intimate duet of this in a hotel in 1968 on Jimi’s portable tape deck.

    158. Asteroid — Pete Moore 1968
    Cinema advertising company Pearl & Dean’s dramatic theme, quoted in concert by Jimi several times during the outro solo of Freedom. eg at Fort Worth 9 May 1970.

    159. Crossroads – Cream 1968
    Played as the basis of a very odd version of ‘Red House’ at the infamous blues jam with Jim Morrison at the Scene club in March 1968

    160. Pearly Queen - Traffic 1968
    Often heard as the basis of the “Session Thing” jam at Electric Lady studios in 1970, and what’s the problem?

    161. Race With The Devil – The Gun 1968
    Often heard as an influence on a couple of late European tour live versions of “Midnight Lightnin’”, and what’s the problem?

    162. Everyday People – Sly & the Family Stone 1968
    A 1968 hit for them. This jammed together with the ‘B’ side ‘Sing A Simple Song’ are basically “Buddy’s” ‘We Got To Live Together’, even the title comes from there! (thanks to ‘purplejim’ for pointing this out)
    Jimi only jammed on ‘We Got To Live Together’ twice, both times with Buddy. It does appear to be an indirect political statement by Jimi (via Buddy), a rejection of the ridiculous ‘aparteid’ position of the ‘black nationalists’ ie the ‘Nation of Islam’; ‘Yorubists’, Karenga and his ‘lets speak Swahili’ nut jobs, the SNCC coup by Stokely etc. The Black Panthers can be looked upon almost as ‘moderates’ in comparison to these race/religion nutters.

    163. Sing A Simple Song – Sly & the Family Stone 1968
    ‘B’ side of ‘Everyday People’. See above (thanks to ‘purplejim’ for pointing this out)

    164. I Just Want To Make Love To You (original 1954 title: ‘Just Make Love To Me’) – Muddy Waters, from his 1968 LP Electric Mud. Instrumentally just a ‘psyche update’ on his earlier ‘Just Make Love To Me’ (Willie Dixon). One of the jams recorded at TTG 16 or 17 October 1968 with Jimi gtr, Jack Bruce bs, Jim McCarty gtr, Buddy Miles dms.
    First noticed by [?] and publicised in Jimpress.

    165. Five To One — The Doors 1968 (possibly only recorded after this jam)
    Jim Morrison groans out the chorus to this during the infamous blues jam at the Scene club on 18? March 1968.
    Last edited by stplsd; 09-06-17 at 10:49 AM.
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: Who Influenced Jimi?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ezy Rider View Post
    George Benson - Thunder Walk, released on Giblet Gravy (1968), which has a riff similar to the main riff of Hendrix / Mitchel's - Beginnings (Woodstock 1969)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ntnqO7fVyZI

    Not sure about that one
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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