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Thread: NOEL REDDING - Guitar For The Practicing Musician 1991

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    NOEL REDDING - Guitar For The Practicing Musician 1991

    GUITAR FOR THE PRACTICING MUSICIAN MAGAZINE

    APRIL 1991 - BY MICHAEL FAIRCHILD

    THE EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME

    For three years, from 1966 to 1969, Noel Redding was the bassist for the legendary Jimi Hendrix Experience. During that time, he toured the world, played on Hendrix's three most influential albums—Are You Experienced?, Axis: Bold as Love, and Electric Ladyland—and became a part of rock n roll history. After quitting school in 1962, Redding traveled around Great Britain and Germany as a guitarist for several unknown bands. During the next four years he had the opportunity to back-up singers like Johnny Halliday, Englebert Humperdinck, and Tom Jones. Then, in September 1966, he went to audition for a gig with Eric Burden's New Animals and found Jimi Hendrix instead. About life with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, Noel stresses, ..we worked so much we didn't sleep for three years. - By June of 1969, Noel had had the Experience of a lifetime and left the then highest paid touring band in the world to pursue a career of his ownwith bands like Fat Mattress, Clonakilty Cowboys, and Road. Twenty-one years later, Noel Redding continues to be amazed by the undiminished interest in Jimi Hendrix wherever he goes. His memoirs of those days, which were derived from his personal diaries by a companion, the late Carol Appleby, are tentatively titled Are You Experienced?

    GFTPM What are your favorite songs by the Jimi Hendrix Experience

    REDDING With my band The Secret Freaks, I like doing "Remember." We never played that before, so it's good to finally play it. We're playing "Can You See Me" really hard because we're playing with a good band. We've done "Hey Joe" once I think, but people expect to hear that. I find it slightly boring. But "Little Miss Lover," "You've Got Me Floating," and mainly the second album are some of my favorites. But there again, on the first album I always liked "Fire," "Manic Depression," and "Can You See.

    GFTPM You kept a diary during your Experience years. What does it bring back for you?

    REDDING If you look in my diary, it's sort of like, "Went to bed at eight Got up at nine. Went to a photograph session. Went recording and then playing in Manchester." That's it. We worked and didn't sleep for three years. It's not a blur, because I kept a diary. I've got a good recollection compared to the other member of the Experience (drummer Mitch Mitchell).

    GFTPM You designate October 6, 1966 as the first day that Mitch came down and you had your first jam with the full trio.

    REDDING That's right. We signed our contract on the 11th and played our first gig on the 13th in Evereux, France, opening for Johnny Halliday. It was like a four song promotional set. I remember carrying the gear, and myself and (Hendrix Manager/producer) Chas Chandler were the road managers (laughs).

    GFTPM In '66, the only tracks that seem to have been recorded were "Hey Joe." "Stone Free," and possibly "Highway Chile."
    You had a few recording sessions before "Hey Joe" want into the charts. Do you recall anything about the sessions at Kingsway Studio?

    REDDING Yeah, but we did "Hey Joe" in a few different locations. It could have been Kingsway, but recall that we did it about 38 times.

    GFTPM Did you sing backup on "Hey Joe" or "Fire?"

    REDDING Nothing on "Hey Joe," but on "Fire" I sang the "Let me stand next to your fire..." bits by myself.

    GFTPM The earliest live recording of the Jimi Hendrix Experience is from the "Top of the Pops" TV show on January 19, 1967. You had the Breakaway Singers and reportedly they only accompanied you on two live appearances to sing backup on "Hey Joe." Was there any other television work before
    this one?

    REDDING Our first telly was on "Ready, Steady. Go" (December 16, 1966) and I think we mimed it. We did it with The Mercy's, The Troggs, and (Yardbirds vocalist) Keith Reif. In those days you'd sort of go to the TV studio during the day, put down your backing track, and come back in like two or three hours. They'd do your makeup and you'd rehearse it again—then they'd do it. I'd say it was probably recorded and then we mimed to a backing track. Maybe Henpecked (Redding's name for Hendrix) then sang the song live, which is what they did in those days.

    GFTPM There are quite a few album songs that never turn up on concert tapes.

    REDDING There's a lot of songs we never played—ever—and tons of songs we never actually played live. We only did them in the studio. I remember recording a certain one called "EXP," when we were recording at Olympic, where myself and Henpecked actually put the guitars on the ground and started kicking them, and they recorded itl And we got this amazing feedback. I put a bass on it and they put it backwards, but I think we were all going backwards, as well (laughs).

    GFTPM Were the first songs recorded live in the studio by the band?

    REDDING Oh yeah, it's all first or second take. 'cause Chandler knew that I didn't like being in the studio. and he didn't like Mitchell anyway. It was like, 'Get this done and go play darts!'

    GFTPM Do you remember the equipment used for any of these early songs?

    REDDING On the first stuff, I was using Chandler's bass. It was a big Gibson. Then I got a Fender Jazz bass, which I used forever. I used it on a gig before it was used in the studio.

    GFTPM Did Jimi tend to write songs by himself?

    REDDING Yeah, sometimes you'd see him sittin' there on an airplane scrapping out an idea, and he'd sort of throw it in his pocket. Obviously, a few things were sort of made up in the studio. But then also, in his hotel he's scribbling away as well. And he'd keep a bundle of papers, which were basic lyric ideas.

    GFTPM Did you try to collaborate with him?

    REDDING I tried. There are a couple of times in my diary where it says, "Went to Jimi's room and wrote a song." But unfortunately, I haven't got a tape of the thing. I think some of those sessions were recorded, but they've all just sort of disappeared. Maybe at the beginning he wanted to do it all himself, but I think he realized later, like on demos when Hendrix played bass and I played guitar, that it doesn't help to write alone. I personally find it much better to work with somebody else, because you can bounce ideas, and if someone writes a lyric, you can go over it and write music and than go back to the other person and arrange the situation.

    GFTPM Was the song "Are You Experienced," the one with the backwards guitar solo, recorded in the winter of '67?

    REDDING The bass is backwards as well. Its just two chords, A and F, and we just did it Chandler probably recorded it and that was it. And then they did this backwards bass thing. That was done by (Hendrix engineer) Eddie Kramer, I'd say. 'Cause in those days, if they were ever setting up a phasing or something like the backwards bass, they'd say, "Go away for half an hour," and we would. We basically just learned the songs in the studio, and that was it.

    GFTPM You're playing "Remember" on your current tour. Do you recall anything about that song?

    REDDING I thought of the bass line, but I didn't get credited for it. There's a lot of songs like that "Midnight" was my song, you know. "My Friend" was a song I wrote while with Jimi. It is not the some song that appeared on Cry of Love. As I said, "Remember" is my riff, and the ending of "Foxy Lady." We were stuck for the ending, so at the end part, instead of going, "Foxy Lady," I said. "Let's play a note," and so that's how we ended it And that was my arrangement. I should've got 5% for it (laughs).

    GFTPM Did you show Jimi the bass line to "Remember?"

    REDDING No, no. no. He showed me the chords. It's in F#. right? Once I learned the chord structure. I'd start putting together something which we would consider a ballad sort of song. It was one of these off-the-cuff songs. We just sort of said. "This one's in A, how's it go?" We played the intro and had to get the tempo, and I just started doing that riff. And Jimi started picking up the riff. But lots of times he showed me some riffs, like on "Little Miss Lover." I think he showed Mitchell the intro to that one on drums too.

    GFTPM How did you come to be that there was no bass on "Red House?"

    REDDING "Red House" was done in London, and Hendrix said, "We're gonna do a blues," or something. I asked him to show it to me on the guitar, because I always learned most of the stuff on the guitar or the bass guitar. There was a guitar there, and I think it was Chandler who said, "Do it." I think it was a Hofner. It was awful. Jimi used a Stratocaster, and it probably took a couple of takes. I can't remember if Jimi sang while we played, but I remember putting two guitar tracks down and then hearing it back and noticing that we didn't notice there was no bass on it It was so full that one thinks there's a bass on it. And with Hendrix doing his lead stuff and I'm just keeping rhythm, it was a very bassy-type situation. I think that was done in the spring of '67. I don't know why it was left off the American version of Are You Experienced?. But if you're a European band, all the record companies used to remix or swap stuff for the American market, which I could never understand at all.

    GFTPM Did you ever play "Third Stone from the Sun" for an audience when you recorded it In the winter of '67'?

    REDDING No. I think we might have played it once, but then after we played it we probably ruined it and we all decided we wouldn't play it again. We never rehearsed. We didn't rehearse at all.

    GFTPM How did Jimi start the guitar-smashing ritual? The first account of him doing it was in the Big Apple Club in Munich in Novem-ber, 1966.

    REDDING I think the audience got rather excited, and they started pulling Henpecked off, right? They pulled the guy off, and he was trying to protect his guitar, and he put it back on the stage and it started feeding back, which is when I think the smashing started. It was laying there and feeding back, and the audience is going crazy, and then he finds that the neck was broken, so smash, crunch, kick! I was going (makes face), because I don't smash guitars, myself.

    GFTPM The next smashing account wasn't until he got to Finsbury Park in London to open the Walker Brothers tour In March, 1967. Why the delay?

    REDDING I think that we'd realized we were a bit tight on money. and you don't go around smashing up guitars at 400 pounds a go. But it was just publicity, as was the lighter fluid bit.

    GFTPM For two months in the summer of '67 you were In America. Do you remember using a wah-wah for the first time?

    REDDING I'd say it was on "Burning of the Midnight Lamp." We did that in New York at Mayfair Studios. Chas was producing and Gary Kelgren was the engineer. Aretha Franklin's backup singers. Sweet Inspiration, were on it, but I think they were put on afterwards. I liked that song, 'cause I liked the different chords in it and the bass lines. I think the first thing which he'd got interested in was a wah-wah pedal, which in those days was called a Crybaby pedal. But this was in London, before Monterey. I used to go and hang out in all the guitar shops on Charring Cross Road when I had nothing else to do. And this one guy found that I was playing with the Experience and he actually said, "We got this new thing. so bring Himself (Hendrix) in." So I got Himself into the shop, which was pretty hard to do, and he tried it out and I think they gave it to him. or he bought it, or whatever. Then he started getting into effects and that sort of stuff, and that's when Roger Mayer turned up with these things already made. But there again, Jimi ended up just using basically a fuzz box and a wah-wah.

    (Note: In a taped interview, Jimi confirms that he was recording with the wah-wah pedal before he knew anything about Eric Clapton's dabblings with it. Jimi used a hand-held version when he recorded "I Don't Live Today" in March, 1967. His first recording with the foot pedal wah-wah is on "Stars That Play with Laughing Sam's Dice," which was actually recorded in L.A. in June 1967).

    GFTPM What is your favorite of the three albums you did with Jimi?

    REDDING Axis.. Bold as Love.

    GFTPM Half the original mix was lost on that one.

    REDDING Yeah. Didn't Hendrix get into a taxi in London one day with the master and lose it?

    GFTPM Do you ever remember a time when you played the lead guitar onstage and Hendrix backed you up?

    REDDING The only time I actually played lead guitar would have been in a club in Cologne. and he played bass. It's called the Storyville Club, and I used to play there previous to the Experience. So we went in there and there was some band playing, and we jumped up to have a play and Hendrix says, "You play guitar and l'll play bass." And he played my bass backwards (Jimi was playing left-handed). I can't remember what we did, but it was just a jam.

    GFTPM There's a review from Tivoli Gardens in Stockholm (September 4, 1967) that says you played lead guitar and JImi played a right-handed bass upside-down.

    REDDING That's right. I also played rhythm guitar on "Red House" at a gig in Paris (Janu-ary 28, 1968) and everybody thinks it's Hendrix playing. But he's playing the lead guitar and I'm playing the rhythm guitar and doing the bass lines. It was Keith Richards' guitar, a gold-top Les Paul. So that's me and my guitar a bit on full-bass. That's two guitars and no bass, though it sounds like there's bass on there. We were rather loud in those days.

    GFTPM Can you tell me anything about the recording of "If 6 Were 97"

    REDDING Oh, hang on, yeah. On the end of it, when we all go into three separate time signatures, that's basically an idea of mine, because we didn't know what to do at that one point in the song. So I started doing this (sings-bass line) and Mitchell did this other rhythm and Hendrix was playing something utterly different. And then at the end, because we didn't know when to come back in, I went boom-boom, boom-boom, at which part we all started doing that and all to the end.

    GFTPM What do you remember about recording "You Got Me Floating?"

    REDDING I played an 8-string bass on that one. I think. It was a Hagstrorn. and I used it on that song, "Spanish Castle Magic" and "Little Miss Lover." I got the bass in New York. I was asleep in a hotel and someone said, "Go downstairs, someone's got a bass for you." So I went down and I had a photograph taken outside this hotel and they gave me this bass, and I've still got the photo. I'm sitting there looking very bleary; I'm in my nightshirt and a pair of funny shoes. And they gave me this bass and I've still got it. That'd be worth a bit, wouldn't it? But I wouldn't sell it. We thought playing an 8-string is basically like playing a 12-string, but they're hard to tune up and they're hard to play. So we used it on three songs because we felt that by not using it too much, it'd make the effect. I used it onstage a few times, like in Rotterdam at the Hippy Happy Market (November 10, 1967).

    GFTPM How about "One Rainy Wish?" Do you remember putting on the sound effects, the Octavia, and the backwards solos?

    REDDING I remember that. That was done at Olympic, I think (October, 1967). I think we took a long time going through it because if Jimi found a complex song, we'd go through each pad, stop, check it, and then go on to the next part until we were ready to attempt putting it down.

    GFTPM At the end of "Bold as Love," where the phasing technique of two tape recorders Is used for the ending-

    REDDING Right. The ending and the build-up was all spontaneous between the whole band. The phasing was first done by the Small Faces, though, on a song called "Ogden's Nut Gone Flake."

    (Note: "Ogden's Nut Gone Flake" was recorded in 1968, whereas "Bold as Love" was recorded in October 1967. Although "Bold as Love" was the first major record release to popularize phasing of sound, the technique had been experimented with by the Beatles and other London groups. In one interview, Jimi referred to a 1959 record called "The Big Hurt" by Tony Fisher, which is probably the first instance of tape phasing.)

    GFTPM Could you tell me about the origins of "She's So Fine," the song you wrote for Axis?

    REDDING Well, that was written in the "Top of the Pops" studio (March 30, 1967). It was before or after we did the television. because we were going down to record after the TV show. The lyric is not about a particular girl, I think, just a basic generalization on women. It was a song about the hippie situation. And I sussed out the riff, 'cause when we did that in the studio, I'd show Hendrix the riff which I'd got for it and which Chandler was saying, "Yeah. that's good, let's do it." I think I played rhythm guitar on that. But Hendrix threw in the G in the middle for me. It's in A, see he thought of that, so it's a bit of a collaboration. He just said. "Let's go to G." and then we did the break, then the bass came in again, and then back into the A to go back into the last verse. Chas Chandler was actually thinking about that one as a single.

    GFTPM You did a tour with Pink Floyd and the Move in the fall of '67, and people wanted to hear "She's So Fine" in concert, but you had a confrontation with Hendrix about It.

    REDDING Yeah. I've got it in my diary. Hendrix refused to play it. It was in L.A. or somewhere, and in my diary it says, "Hendrix pulled a moody." Because people were asking for "She's So Fine," but we never played it. And I was saying. "Okay, we're playing all his songs all night, how come we can't play one of my songs when the audience is asking for it?" So that's basically logical, isn't it? But he's the leader of the band, so what could one do? I could just sort of slag him off. Maybe he was jealous because I'd have to sing it.

    GFTPM Jimi wasn't communicating much with you during the next tour, and you kept saying you wanted to have a group talk?

    REDDING Yeah. But he had become a star, hadn't he?

    GFTPM Do you remember Anaheim on February 9, 1968, where the press panned Hendrix for not doing any theatrics?

    REDDING Oh yeah, he pulled another moody. It's in my diary.

    GFTPM Did you know he was sick with a cold or the flu at that time?

    REDDING He wouldn't sing and I criticized him for it. But I'm allowed to criticize him: I'm the bass player. And then there was the Fort Worth gig (on February 17th). I remember it vividly. We arrive at the gig, and normally you sit in a crappy room before you play and have a chat and a joint or a beer. But there, we got put in separate dressing rooms, which I couldn't relate to. I went to hang out with him in his room and he asked what I was doing there. He was trying to be a star. That was the night I spoke to Chas Chandler about leaving the band. And Chas said, "Do it now." But we got things back together about a week later.

    GFTPM At that same gig, Mitch Mitchell accused the roadies of sabotaging the equipment. Were you having gear problems?

    REDDING No. no, no. I'll tell ya. I'd play through anything. I'd play through a cardboard box, and if it exploded, we'd play acoustic. But then Hendrix was being like, "Hang on, I've got a buzz in my amplifier." I think he was alienating himself from the road crew at that point, which is the worst thing to do. And I think maybe Mitchell picked up on that. I don't think it was sabotage, but back then, we were carrying amps on airplanes and there were no flight cases or anything like that. Then we'd just take the guitars out, tune 'em up, and play. So an amp might go wrong there.

    GFTPM You had another big fight with Jimi during the "Voodoo Chile" sessions for Electric Ladyland in New York on May 1, 1968. You left again and Jack Casady from the Jefferson Airplane and Steve Winwood ended up on the long version that's called "Voodoo Chile." What happened?

    REDDING Well, I told him to get all the people out of the studio. I came into the place and there's like thirty people in the booth where you're trying to work and I said, "Excuse me, can I sit down? I'm just the bass player." And then I had a real big go at Hendrix and I walked out. It was right in front of all these people, which was embarrassing for him, not for me (laughs). I came back later to do the version of "Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)," and that was filmed by a crew in the studio.

    GFTPM Did you play bass on "House Buming Down" Of "Rainy Day, Dream Away?"

    REDDING No. I think it's Jimi on bass. I might have played bass on the original take of "Electric Ladyland," but I think Hendrix took it off and put the bass on himself. But that was the point when the band had gone silly, you know? We weren't really working well together at that point. I played on "Come On, Part 1," I think. I probably did the original of "Long Hot Summer Night," but again, that's maybe another one which Hendrix overdubbed.

    GFTPM Did Jimi play piano on "Spanish Castle Magic?" He said he played on "Crosstown Traffic" in December, 1967.

    REDDING He played on "Crosstown", it's like a drone note. I played bass on it, and Dave Mason (from Traffic) sang backing vocals with me and Mitch. I don't know of Jimi playing piano on "Spanish Castle," though. He did play electric harpsichord on "Burning of the Midnight Lamp."

    GFTPM Dave Mason played acoustic guitar on "All Along the Watchtower" on January 20, 1968?

    REDDING He played the bass, too. I didn't play the bass—I left. Nobody knows that Mason played bass on it, but it's all in my diary. Later on, we got lots of requests to play it onstage, but we never did. I don't know the chords to it. I didn't play on it. It's in A minor, isn't it?

    GFTPM What about the bass solo on "1983?"

    REDDING That's Hendrix. I didn't play on "Gypsy Eyes," either.

    GFTPM So, what you're saying Is that Electric Ladyland is your least involvement with the Experience?

    REDDING That's right. I did play on "Burning of the Midnight Lamp." "Midnight" is my tune, but it's credited to Hendrix. I put in my diary: "Did my Booker T. riff." And that goes back to a Booker T. and the MGs riff, an F#7 to an A. It was inspired by a single, on the other side of "Green Onions" or something—"Homegrown," I think. Hendrix would ask me to show it to him on the guitar. So I showed it to him on the guitar backwards (a left-handed setup) or I'd find another guitar and play it and he'd normally play the bass as well. I wrote "Little Miss Strange" in a hotel in New York and I play guitar on that, a Gibson, but Hendrix did the solos. When we were doing Electric Ladyland. I'd be turning up at the studio at six o'clock and Hendrix wouldn't be there. So I worked on my stuff, and there's also a few tracks which I did with Stephen Stills. Some of my tapes are still at Electric Lady (the New York studio built by Hendrix), but they wanted $10,000 to let me have them. "She's So Fine" and "Little Miss Strange" are the only two songs from the Experience that I still receive royalties from.

    GFTPM The Copenhagen, Denmark show from January 10, 1969 is one of the most inspired Hendrix gigs I've ever heard. At that show, Hendrix uses for the first time the two-handed hammer-ons that are associated with Eddie Van Helen. It was during "Taxtree." It seems like he invented that technique right there.

    REDDING That's right; I remember that. You say that the European tour was really inspired, but it was horrible for us. It was bad mentally. I think it all related to the basic business situation at the time. I was conscious of us being legally stolen from, but the thing is, Mitchell and the band didn't care. I was thinking that I wanted to retire and become a record producer. But they just didn't care. We could go anywhere and do anything and they'd love it. Tapes from the tour might sound good, but I don't know. We were probably just working very hard then and playing very seriously. I'd say.

    GFTPM It's been reported that Mike Jeffrey (the Experience's manager after Chas Chandler) had to cajole you into doing the last Experience tour of the U.S. in the spring of 1969.

    REDDING Yeah, I know. I didn't want to do it. All the people were saying that the only reason I did that tour was because I could get my band Fat Mattress to open on the tour, but that's incorrect. I didn't want to do the tour and they said they were going to sue me. So I said 'We'll all go, and I'll do the tour with my band along, too.' I didn't know it was going to be the last tour, but to me, the band was over in '68.

    GFTPM Did you know that Hendrix was secretly flying bassist Billy Cox into New York In '68 and was planning the Band of Gypsies?

    REDDING No, but we were all planning our own bands at the time. The idea was that we'd each have a band and all tour together. Then at the end of the night, we'd play as the Experience. That was the original idea.

    GFTPM Your last gig with the Jimi Hendrix Experience was in Denver on June 29, 1969. Did you know that it was the last gig when you got there?

    REDDING No, I just got on a plane. There were no more bookings after that, and I don't know why. But we were pretty tired by then, so I was looking forward to a break.

    GFTPM You and Jimi weren't friends before the Experience, you were hired into that band.

    REDDING Sort of. Mitch and I hung out a lot together, but we're English. If we'd go out, Jimi would stay in his room. But any bad feelings came from us being three guys who were traveling too hard, getting too tired, and taking too many drugs. I personally feel it was tiredness that did us in. I liked Hendrix. I don't like Mitchell. At the time of the Denver gig. I really wanted to play with Fat Mattress, because that was giving me an outlet for writing. In the Experience, I wasn't allowed to write in the band apart from my two songs, and I thought I should actually co-produce. I left the band In Denver, but I knew it was over back in '68. If the Experience had toured after that, I'd have played, but the thing is, I started getting into the business. I was seeing lawyers and the rest of the band was sod of taking my advice. And I'm saying. "Be careful! I'm not gonna work if I'm not getting any money." We were earning lots of money, but where did it go? So in Denver, I got on the plane because I was fed up with touring.

    GFTPM Do you believe that in time you all would've gotten back together again?

    REDDING I'd say yes. Like, if I have an argument with someone, I'm not afraid to walk up and say, "I'm sorry for what I said, let's go and talk about it"

    GFTPM The Fat Mattress was beginning to do gigs and recording, with two albums in the summer of 1969. But then you came to America in November and you had a spat, and the band broke up in a number of weeks. Did that prompt you to rejoin the Experience?

    REDDING No, but they did ask me to rejoin, and I said yes. It was for a tour in '70. We had a meeting in February, 1970 at Mike Jeffrey's place in New York. It was an interview for Rolling Stone magazine. We all agreed to do it, I shook hands with Hendrix and it was wonderful. But that's when Billy Cox came in on bass, and I didn't know about that until I came in for rehearsals: Mitch's girlfriend told me. When I saw Hendrix again, he was very apologetic. We jammed in a studio called the Sound Center, but the tapes are still at Electric Lady. Stevie Angel is on drums. Lee Michaels played organ on a few things, and two guys from The Churls were doing singing and playing guitar. I was doing bass. guitar and vocals, and we also had some strings on a thing called 'Walking Through A Garden." We had a bagpipe player. too. Hendrix came down and I played him a song.

    GFTPM There's an article that mentions you were playing with Johnny Winter at some point in the spring of 1970, while Hendrix was touring with Billy Cox and Mitch Mitchell. During that some period you were going to tour with Jeff Beck.

    REDDING I wasn't actually playing with Johnny Winter. I was probably hanging out with him. I just jammed with him, maybe at the Scene. He thought about asking me to join his band, but he didn't want any foreigners—he's from Texas. Beck used to come and play at my house and eat bacon sandwiches, 'cause his wife wouldn't let him eat bacon at home (laughs)! But he only played bass there; I'd play guitar all the time. And the tour never came off.

    GFTPM There are reports that Jimi had no royalty money to build Electric Lady Studios, so he had to use gig money.

    REDDING No, no, no. While I was there, Warner Brothers loaned the money to Jeffery and Hendrix. That was all my royalties, everyone's royalties.

    GFTPM Have you heard the new tapes that Chas Chandler has uncovered of the Experience that he's had for all these years? Weren't you going to re-do some of the rhythm tracks with him?

    REDDING Yeah. We went to Newcastle and over-dubbed everything about three years ago. I did nine tracks in a day. Mitchell took Iwo weeks to do one track. There's a bunch of tracks on there that have never been heard, about ten I'd say. They're from the Are You Experienced? and Axis period. One track is like a party.

    GFTPM The "Devil Jam?'

    REDDING No, that was done in Los Angeles in October, '68. There's a lot of songs that are related to other Hendrix-type songs. I think we do "Sunshine of Your Love." Chas told me he's got enough unreleased stuff for three albums. But the album is already bogged down with legal stuff. so the tapes are at a stalemate. When they release them it's going to be like multi-platinum in about ten minutes. It's all unreleased stuff, not alternate takes of what's out there.

    GFTPM Does listening to these old Experience tapes interest you?

    REDDING I don't listen to them. I prefer to verbalize about it. I'd probably play it once and put it in my cupboard. I'd probably listen to the overall sound, seeing what the vibe of the band is at that point, to see how well we're playing, 'cause now I've got a different opinion at the playing. I try and treat playing now as having a good time. But in those days, we were very serious because we were very young and we were very successful.

    GFTPM What do you remember most when you think about those years?

    REDDING Getting no sleep for three years (laughs). Well, I still feel sad, obviously. And I think about the financial situation, which I never got. Other people who didn't even know the band are gettin' these millions of dollars which I worked my ass off for. That gets up my nose. But I've got fond memories and I miss Jimi. We'd talk mainly about business things, but the rest of the time we were just basically hanging out and having a good time. After this book comes out I'll get rid of my stage clothes, just keep my old albums and concentrate on the future. When the book comes out, it'll all be out of my system, thank you very much. I'm gonna carry on and I might do a bit of touring, and I've thought about starting up painting again. But my advice to musicians is that they should become a lawyer and an accountant at the same time, and never sign anything without getting a copy of it, and never trust anyone (laughs)! You have to be very careful in this business. There are still people getting ripped off all over the place.

    GFTPM Do you think Jimi was moving towards a jazz-type setting for his music at the end?

    REDDING I think he would have gone into a bit more of a jazz situation. But I don't know: I can't predict. I'd say he would have gone towards jazz because he needed to have a change. His material had sort of basically run out. He really needed to take a year off and rest. He should have taken some time off and let me and Mitchell write some more songs. But he put all the burden on himself. So he got very tired. He needed to relax. He should have moved to Ireland. I think if it had kept together we would have been on par with the Rolling Stones and that sort. But the "might-have-beens" don't bother me anymore. It used to, but it doesn't bother me now. I just like to have a good time playing music. I hope people enjoy what I'm playing, and that's about it.

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    Re: NOEL REDDING - Guitar For The Practicing Musician 1991

    Henpecked:
    adjective
    1. browbeaten, bullied, by one's wife, girlfriend, etc.: a henpecked husband who never dared to contradict his wife.

    Noel Redding, quote: ".......maybe Henpecked (Redding's name for Hendrix) then sang the song live, which is what they did in those days."

    Why did Redding nickname Jimi "Henpecked"?
    I'm thinking HE may have tried to henpeck Jimi, who else?

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    Re: NOEL REDDING - Guitar For The Practicing Musician 1991

    Jimi referred to Noel as "Bob Dylan's grandmother"

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    Re: NOEL REDDING - Guitar For The Practicing Musician 1991

    '...REDDING Yeah. We went to Newcastle and over-dubbed everything about three years ago. I did nine tracks in a day. Mitchell took Iwo weeks to do one track. There's a bunch of tracks on there that have never been heard, about ten I'd say. They're from the Are You Experienced? and Axis period. One track is like a party....'
    ---
    Do we have these 10? tracks he's talking about?
    Is this what is on the Noel Redding Experience Sessions LP?
    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....wL._SX522_.jpg

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    Re: NOEL REDDING - Guitar For The Practicing Musician 1991

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Lucas View Post
    '...REDDING Yeah. We went to Newcastle and over-dubbed everything about three years ago. I did nine tracks in a day. Mitchell took Iwo weeks to do one track. There's a bunch of tracks on there that have never been heard, about ten I'd say. They're from the Are You Experienced? and Axis period. One track is like a party....'
    ---
    Do we have these 10? tracks he's talking about?
    Is this what is on the Noel Redding Experience Sessions LP?
    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....wL._SX522_.jpg
    Noel is referring to the tracks that he and Mitch overdubbed, which first surfaced on the Studio Haze boot in the 90s. By npw every track has been released in some form by EH.
    https://www.discogs.com/Jimi-Hendrix...elease/4532403

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    Re: NOEL REDDING - Guitar For The Practicing Musician 1991

    Quote Originally Posted by souldoggie View Post
    Henpecked:
    adjective
    1. browbeaten, bullied, by one's wife, girlfriend, etc.: a henpecked husband who never dared to contradict his wife.

    Noel Redding, quote: ".......maybe Henpecked (Redding's name for Hendrix) then sang the song live, which is what they did in those days."

    Why did Redding nickname Jimi "Henpecked"?
    I'm thinking HE may have tried to henpeck Jimi, who else?
    According to one of the biographies (i forget which), in the early Experience days, one of the roadies swore he once saw the band billed as the "Garry Henpecked Exposition", hence the nickname. They had numerous names for each other. They would also sometimes call Jimi "The Bat", because he avoided sunlight, and preferred it dark in his hotel rooms...

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    Re: NOEL REDDING - Guitar For The Practicing Musician 1991

    Quote Originally Posted by DevilsAvocado View Post
    According to one of the biographies (i forget which), in the early Experience days, one of the roadies swore he once saw the band billed as the "Garry Henpecked Exposition", hence the nickname. They had numerous names for each other. They would also sometimes call Jimi "The Bat", because he avoided sunlight, and preferred it dark in his hotel rooms...
    Makes me rather think of Devon Wilson henpecking Jimi!

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    Re: NOEL REDDING - Guitar For The Practicing Musician 1991

    What is pretty obvious, also from this interview, is that Noel held a serious grudge against Mitch. And Mitch didnt speak particularly fondly about Noel either, although i've only heard Mitch's opinion of Noel as a musician ("Billy was a Bass player, Noel was a Bass OWNER", or something to that effect).
    Some day, i would like to know what really went down between those two. It seems to have escalated in the years following Jimi's passing....
    I heard Noel speak at a musician's seminar once, and he said that he had never been friends with Mitch, but all he offered as an explanation, was that he himself came from a working class background, and Mitch was more from a middle-class situation. Could it be as simple as that?

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