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Thread: Noel Redding - Goldmine Interview 1997

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    Noel Redding - Goldmine Interview 1997

    From Goldmine Magazine Issue June 20, 1997

    Interview By Dave Thompson


    Noel Redding was the engine room of the Jimi Hendrix Experience. As flamboyant a bassist as Hendrix was guitarist, Redding provided the bedrock from which his bandmate could depart on his own flights of fancy,. More than that, he supplied the impetus behind those flights.

    A liquid, fearless guitar player in his own right, when Redding played the bass it was with the same fluid style as he handled the lead, and a melodic power which left Hendrix with no alternative but to match, and try to surpass him. Only occasionally did he succeed, and it is with· no disrespect whatsoever to Hendrix that one can say that. With drummer Mitch Mitchell completing a dauntlessly symmetrical triumvirate, the members of the Experience were equals, as bandmates and as musicians. .

    The remastered editions of the three albums this trio recorded together, Are You Experienced, Axis: Bold As Love and Electric Ladyland hammer this point home like never before. In returning to the original master tapes of those records, Eddie Kramer and George Marino also returned to the original spirit of the band, to the unadulterated democracy which permeated the sessions.

    Rock 'N' Roll history, whether powered by nostalgia for all that Hendrix once represented, or sadness for all that he didn't live to achieve, has tended to champion Jimi almost beyond recognition. From hippy demagogue to mystic demi-God, it is a process which past reissues of his catalog have, perhaps inadvertently, but certainly damagingly, hastened. There is, after all, nothing like a poorly mastered, umpteenth generation tape to distort a recording. To listen anew to those albums is to realize afresh what was involved in their creation; to appraise once again the dynamics involved. Three musicians, three instruments, three equal contributions, with the "fourth member" of the trio, manager Chas Chandler, providing both the creative and spiritual glue which held everything together.

    To even attempt to deny that, or to deny Hendrix's partners the plaudits and rewards they so richly deserve, is not only to ignore the evidence of one's own senses. It is to purposefully denigrate everything that Hendrix himself stood for, and believed in. That is a lesson which any current chroniclers of the Hendrix legend would do well to heed. Historical untruths have a nasty habit of backfiring on even the sincerest liar.

    Considering his past; considering the larger than lifesize status which is his for the taking, Noel Redding remains a remarkably modest man: Compliments are accepted with an embarrassed laugh, and comment on his success, and he admits he doesn't understand it. "They liked us, for some reason" is a common explanation. But he is under no misapprehensions about what he created, and the role he played during that process. He knows his worth, and if he sometimes
    sells himself short, that's the nature of the man, not the status of the musician. For the musician himself is just that, a consummate; musician, a natural showman, a born trouper.

    The night before we spoke, a ticketing screw up forced him to miss a concert in the Channel Islands; it was a small club, and a small crowd, the kind of bread and butter event that pays the phone bill and is forgotten days later. No big deal, right? Wrong. It was the first show Redding has missed in years. And while he might have forgotten it if he'd got there and played, he will never forget it now. Because now he has to start counting again.

    Noel Redding has worked almost consistently in the years since the Experience imploded. Bands like Fat Mattress, Road, and his own Noel Redding Band remain fond memories on both the British and American live circuit, while the acoustic duo which he formed with girlfriend Carol Appleby became a major attraction on the club circuit even without the added benefits of Redding's name. There is no telling how high their stock might have risen were it not for Carol's death in a road accident in 1990. as the pair returned home from a gig. Since Redding's career has only diversified further.

    He has made several television documentaries, including the acclaimed BBC documentary Linda McCartney Behind The Lens; he has published a musicians' manual, The Noel Redding Method Bass Book (Carol Fisher Music), his second book, following the autobiographical Are You Experienced (Da Capo Press), which he co-wrote with Carol. He is a fully paid up member of the Rock'n'Roll Hall Of Fame, the Experience was inducted in 1992; and this year, the guitar manufacturers Fender unveiled their own tribute to his genius, the Noel Redding Jazz Fender Bass. He has appeared onstage with Mountain, and guested with Phish; and has recorded with members of Pearl Jam and the Yardbirds.

    Goldmine: What else are you up to right now?

    Noel Redding: I've been trying to retire for the last couple of years, only I can't afford to. Thankfully, people keep phoning up and offering me gigs all the time, so at 51 years old, I thought I'd give it a last go. I've got Eric Bell (ex-Thin Lizzy; he developed the signature lead which powered 'Whiskey In The Jar') on guitar; my drummer since 1969 is Les Sampson (ex-Stray 'Dog); I've got another guitarist, a guy called Anthony Krizan who played with the Spin Doctors and Mick Taylor, and a vocalist called Amanda Leigh, who's from New York. I thought I'd add a female vocalist to bring something new to it. And we're going to be called, Redding, Willing and Mable. I've been trying to use that name for some years, but I've always been afraid.

    Presumably the problem is finding someone willing to be renamed Mable?

    "That's what I'm going to say to the audience, 'This is Amanda on vocals, so we have to find out who Mable is.' One night I'll get Eric or the drummer drunk, and make them wear a dress.

    Are you looking for a record deal?

    I can't treat music that seriously any longer. I've got no time for all these people who are so serious, trying to get deals, and become stars and all that rubbish.

    Plus you've already been there, done that. You're in a position now where you can just relax and do it for the right reasons.

    That's it. So this thing, Redding, Willing And Mable, is hopefully going to happen in July, and we're going to come across to the US for a few gigs.

    It's great, though, because I don't actually have a 'band' anymore. I have musicians I work with; there's one group in Britain, there's one group in America, there's one group in Ireland, which is where I now live. And we get together, we rehearse for seven. minutes, and we're off. It's so much easier than being 'responsible' for a single group of musicians.

    I've also been working in France and Italy with this band from.Switzerland; they're called More Experience ... yes, I know. They do play all Hendrix stuff, but it's kinda interesting, and it's a cushy gig for me because they go on, then I jump up and play bass on about six tunes, then on the encore I jump up and play guitar,. which freaks them all out."

    Guitar was your original instrument, wasn't it?

    It was all rather strange when I joined the Experience, I went to the audition for Eric Burdon and the New Aninals, but they'd already found someone, and I was about to leave when Chas Chandler, God bless him, walked up to me and asked if I could play bass? I said no, but I'll give it a go, so I was handed this bass guitar, and introduced to these other guys, other musicians, who were, in the studio, So we started jamming, played these three tunes with a keyboard player, 'Mike O'Neill; a drummer, Aynsley Dunbar; and this American gentleman wearing a funny raincoat.

    "Then afterwards, the American gentleman asked me if I wanted to go down the, pub, and of course, musicians always say yes to that. So we went down the pub, and he was asking me all about the English music scene, I was asking him all about the American music scene, then he asked if I'd like to join his group. And that was Hendrix.

    You'd never played bass before?

    I'd never played bass before in my life. What I did, being a guitar player, I just withdrew the top two strings and thought about the four that were left. Chas gave me a few little learners, a few pointers, and after that, I had it sussed. It was very quick; we were working within two weeks. We only rehearsed for something like three days."

    Did you have a drummer at the time?

    Yeah. It was me and Hendrix, and· Aynsley again. We tried out John Banks, who was a very good friend of mine, he's passed on now; we tried him, and me and Hendrix got on really well with him, but he wouldn't join the group because he hated flying. Then there was another drummer, some guy from Newcastle who was rather good, and then we tried Mitch Mitchell, who was with Georgie Fame's band, the Blue Flames, at that time. And we liked all of them; Mitch was a steadier drummer, which I preferred, and Hendrix preferred, but in the end, Chas tossed a coin to decide. And Mitch Mitchell got the job.

    After that, and Chas has said this on film, he and Hendrix were secretly auditioning other drummers for the next year. But in the end Mitch stayed on pretty much the whole time, even after I left the group.

    The Experience made its debut in Evereux, France, opening for Johnny Halliday. That seems a very strange pairing.

    It was, but we went down really well. The French loved us, for some reason. There's a plaque there now, a marble plaque which the Mayor of Evereux unveiled last year, to mark the 30th anniversary of our first ever show.

    Then it was into the studio to record "Hey Joe," which would become the Experience's first single.

    "Hey Joe" we started recording that in November '66. We went to tons of different studios, it was a matter of availability of time, and availability of cheap sessions. For example, we'd be playing in Birmingham, we'd drive back to London that night and go straight into the studio for two or three hours. We must have taken that track around half a dozen different studios in London, and we must have done the song 38 different times, until finally, at some point Chas said 'that's the one.' And we just went 'huh?' because by then, we couldn't tell the difference between any of them . I hate recording over three takes. But we got it down, they put it out around Christmas, we did the last but one episode of the Ready Steady Go television show, and by January, 1967, it was in the chart. We were made within' a couple of months.

    It really was that quick, wasn't it?

    It was. I met Hendrix on 28 September. We got Mitchell, we did two days rehearsal which wasn't really rehearsal because we just went down the pub and discussed what we might do. We did the Halliday tour, then we came back to London and started doing all these little clubs, and that's when we noticed that the Beatles were coming to all the gigs, and the Rolling Stones, which freaked me out because I was only 20 years old, We did a stint in Munich in November, then back to London, more clubs, the TV, and suddenly we had a #7 hit, and "Purple Haze" was already ready to go. Chas always said we never planned to do anything, we just recorded whenever we could.

    Forgive an awkward transition here, but what had you been doing before you joined the Experience?

    I went professional when I was 17, after I left art school, and I'd been playing mainly in Scotland and Germany, with a band called the Burnettes. In those days, you played from 7 o'clock till 1 o'clock in the clubs, so I put in my time there! Then I had another band after that, called the Loving Kind, and our manager was Gordon Mills, who managed Englebert Humperdinck and Tom Jones, and in the 70s, Gilbert O'Sullivan. We did three Singles for Pyel-Piccadilly, did a few gigs and all that rubbish, but then I remember one day, Gordon Mills phoned me and said 'you're supposed to be playing in Wales tonight,' which was something like an eleven hour drive. But I got all the guys together, we got in the van, we drove to Wales, and when we got there they said 'sorry lads, you're on next week.' So I left the group, I walked out, and Gordon Mills told me I would never work again.

    Which is when you joined the Experience.

    In the spring of 1967, we did the tour with the Walker Brothers and Humperdinck, and Mills was there. But it gets better. Humperdinck's guitarist was taken ill on the first night, so I'd do my spot with the Experience, then I'd run round after that, they gave me a chair behind the stage and a long lead, and I'd play guitar for Humperdinck without being seen: And I got an extra three pounds a week from Gordon Mills!

    That must have infuriated him!

    Yeah, I think it probably did

    You came off that tour, and it was straight over to America to play the Monterey Pop Festival.

    That was great, because of course, I'd never been to America; we flew over, and I was sitting next to Brian Jones, of all people, who'd taken me under his wing in London. He used to take me back to my hovel of a flat in his Rolls Royce, drop us off, drop in for a joint. He was great. Anyway, we went to Monterey and I suppose it was that which actually made the band in America. It got us the record deal with Reprise, it made everybody aware of us.
    After that, we went up to San Francisco, and did the thing with Bill Graham at his place (the Fillmore), then we were going to come home; it was funny, because we really were only supposed to be here for a couple of weeks. But that's when Michael Jeffries, our other manager, phoned up Chas and said, 'ah, I've got this great tour for you,' and Chas went 'what's that?' And Jeffries said, 'The Monkees!'

    Chas completely freaked out, but Jeffries had already signed the thing, and we had to do it.

    Was it the mismatched nightmare that everybody remembers it as?

    We died a death with the audience, but it was an experience. I had a great time. There was the Monkees airplane, I got a Monkees badge. We started with them down in Florida, we worked our way up the East Coast, and we got to New York, and that's when Chas and Dick Clark, who was the promotor, said 'we have to get them off this tour.' So they leaked this thing to the press that the Daughters of the American Revolution had said that our act was obscene, which got worldwide press and that just made the band bigger. So we left the Monkees tour, but we stayed in America for another three months, through the summer of 1967.Then we came back to Britain, and by that time in Britain, we were huge.

    That fall of 1967, the Experience played what remains one of the greatest package tours of the era, scouring the British Isles for two weeks on a bill which reads like a who's who of British psychedelia: the Experience, the Move, Pink Floyd, Amen Comer and the Nice. Was it really as magical as it sounds?

    It was hilarious. I remember the Move were playing once, and I rode a bicycle across the stage. Another time we put stink bombs underneath the drummer's foot pedal.

    Was there much socializing between band?

    Yes, it was completely ... everyone used to hang out with everybody else. Us lot were really close with the Move. We played for 45 minutes, they had half an hour, and it was like the shows we did with the Who; they'd try and upstage us, we'd try and upstage them. But it was really friendly as well. Trevor Burton, the rhythm guitar player with the Move, always used to travel with us, and if I was running late, I'd travel with the Move. After gigs we'd all go to pubs together, get pissed, then attempt to get on the coach at the proper time; we'd miss the coach and have to get buses and trains. We did it and we went everywhere, all over Britain.

    You seem to have spent a lot of time on the road!

    I started touring in 1964, and never stopped. After the Move tour, we came back to America in 1968, and we did the sort of tour which I would never ever do again. It was something like 66 dates in 67 days, it was unbelievable. That's why, when I go out working now, I'll only go out for three weeks at the most, then come home and get sane again. Otherwise I won't do it, because I did it all then.

    Looking back, it seems that the band had shifted its attention completely towards America, and were intending to make this your base. The long tours, and of course the decision to start recording here; was there a sense that you'd already done all you needed to in Europe, and this was the logical place to be?

    I think the (Electric Ladyland) studio was part of it. Hendrix was already thinking about moving to New York and opening his own place. But Mitch and I never liked America; I did live here for a time in the early I970s, and then I suddenly realized 'no, I can't stand America.' So, I think it was because of the studio that Hendrix wanted to come back. It was never a permanent thing, though. Hendrix did always like England, and it was an English band really. It started in England, and he finished in England.

    Plus, your best records were the ones you made in England.

    Yeah, I agree with you. The stuff we did in America, apart from "Burning Of The Midnight Lamp," didn't work as well. I'd say we all preferred working in London. After we rushed around making "Hey Joe," we did most of our recording at Olympic Studios, which is where we met Eddie Kramer, who was an assistant engineer there. I remember while we were at Olympic recording for our last album, the one which became Electric Ladyland, the Stones were next door. We were in there, and we used to go and hang out, have a smoke, all that stuff, and it was a good atmosphere. If Chas wanted to do a bit of mixing, he'd go 'alright lads, go down the pub,' and we'd troop off. It was very laid back, very relaxed. Whereas American studios were··always so clinical. It wasn't such a good environment to be working in.

    How did things go off in the studio?

    In England? It was very relaxed. I like to make mistakes on records, there's mistakes on the Experience albums that probably no more than one percent of people would notice. I remember, I'd call over to Chas, 'hey, I hit a wrong note,' and he'd go 'don't worry, no one will fucking notice,' in that wonderful Geordie accent of his. Then Hendrix used to drop a couple of notes here or there, or miss a slight lyric, and Chas would say 'don't worry, mate.' It was great, we paid a lot of attention to what we were doing, but it was the feel we were after, more than technical perfection.

    Although you only have a couple of songs on the albums, you were writing quite a lot of material at this time, weren't you?

    Yeah, that's why I did the Fat Mattress album. That was in late '68. I went in and did the first Fat Mattress album, as a writing outlet. People said it was because I was still a frustrated guitarist, and I wanted to go back to playing guitar, but really, it was because I was writing so many songs, and I wanted to get them .out.

    I had two tunes released with Hendrix. There was "She's So Fine," which I wrote at Top.Of The Pops; I wrote it there, and played it to Chas, and he said 'yeah, I like that,' so we did it. And Chas was nearly going to put it out as a single, because it would be a good PR thing to say 'here's a song written by the bass player.' But it didn't happen, I don't think the record company (Polydor) went for it.

    Then there was "Little Miss Strange," which is on Electric Ladyland. That was done in '68, when we were attempting to record the album, and things were falling apart within the band. I went into the studio two days running, and Hendrix didn't even turn up. So I recorded "Little Miss Strange," just me and Mitch, then when Hendrix came in and heard it, he overdubbed the guitar.

    I did some other things. "Dream" and "Touch You" were also recorded during the Electric Ladyland sessions. On "Dream;" I played lead, Hendrix played bass. Then there was "Dance," which was going to have Mitch singing lead, only it didn't really work, so we scrapped it. Hendrix took the riff and turned it into "Ezy Rider." There were a couple of sessions with Stephen Stills, something with Larry Coryell. All that stuff has disappeared, no one knows where it is, apparently. It'll probably all turn up at some point, on a new compilation, but it doesn't really make a difference to me either way, because I don't get any money for any of that stuff.:

    You are joking, of course?

    No. I've never received a penny from the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Sorry, a cent. I get my writing royalties for the two songs I wrote, but I have never received anything from the Experience."

    How does that work?

    It's a long story, read my book! Basically: I was paid off in 1974, 30,000 pounds, and that's it. It sounds a lot, but compared with what the catalog has earned, and is continuing to earn, it's peanuts.

    That was under the old administration, the Alan Douglas crew, of course. Now that the rights to the catalog have gone to Jimi's family, an organization which apparently prides itself on its honesty, ethics, and doing the right thing by ]imi, surely things will change?

    Put it this way. Luckily, I'm still working. Luckily, I can still play.

    When did you actually leave the Experience?

    By the time we recorded "Little Miss Strange," the band had already broken up, although no-one knew about it. Chas had already left the session; we were doing these sessions in New York, and this was during that period when Hendrix would arrive with 14 people, and I'd go into the booth and there'd be nowhere to sit. So I'd say to someone, 'can I have a chair?' and they'd go 'who are you, man?' I'd say 'I'm sorry; but I'm the bass player.' And I had a huge argument with Hendrix, in the booth, and I walked out.

    We carried on playing together for a bit longer, but it was all over. We did a huge tour of Europe and America, and then we got to Denver, where some journalist asked me what I thought about Hendrix announcing to the press that he was going to expand the band. I said 'well, he hasn't asked me,' and I left. I did the gig, and I got on the next plane back to London.

    ...Any regrets?

    No. None at all. But after I left, and Chas left, there was nobody to kick him up the ass, which is why there were no more records.

    He did seem very directionless during that period, up until his death.

    That's why we· were going to get back together. After I left, I did another Fat Mattress album, then the Mattress deflated on an American tour, and in January, 1970, Michael Jeffries phoned me up in England and said 'look, we're going. to put the band back together again, can you come across and have a meeting?' So I flew over to New York, and we did this huge interview with Rolling Stone, and it was all planned. We were going to get back together, we were going to do a huge tour of America, a major tour of Europe, Australia, Japan.

    And then, in about March, I went back; we were supposed to rehearse, but we never rehearsed anyway, and I was caIling up Hendrix and I could never get through to him. Which is when 1 found out he'd got·Billy Cox in, for some reason. I don't know why, but it didn't work for him. So I did an album of my own in New York, and Jimi did come and play on one track; the album's called Good Luck Thank You Very Much, and some people are talking about putting it out. It's never been released before; in fact, I've only just got the tapes back.

    Anyway, that was the last time we played together. There was still talk of reforming the Experience, Chas was coming back into the picture, the whole team was going to get back together. And then Hendrix passed away.

    See, Jimi was lost without Chas Chandler, and he knew it. Chas was wonderful with him, he was a great producer, a good bloke, he'd hang out, he was wonderful. And he's really the one who has never got his due; he never even got paid. Chas never got paid!

    They've just put out Electric Ladyland again, and poor Chas, who actually did produce "Crosstown Traffic," "And The Gods Made Love," "All Along The Watchtower," all the great tracks on the album, doesn't even get a credit. It doesn't seem right. When he died, his widow told me that she .was in a bit of a bad situation, and that's infuriating. There's all this money floating around, and they can't spare threepence-half penny for the people who ... you know, it's so strange to see history being rewritten; to see your own history Being rewritten. I've read some of the things that are coming out about Hendrix now, and if I didn't know any better, I'd say Hendrix must have had six hands, because there was no drummer or bass player. Eight hands, because he need two at the consul as well.

    And I'm only glad that most people, at least people who've got any sense at all, realize that Hendrix, bless him, couldn't have done it without Chas, and Mitchell and myself.



    Here's a link to Corky Laing's website were he talks about Noel Redding's time as a member of his band "Cork" which included Leslie West.


    http://www.sandiegoreader.com/weblog...ild-man-fisch/

    Last edited by RobbieRadio; 10-14-11 at 02:53 PM.

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    Re: Noel Redding - Goldmine Interview 1997

    That's a great interview and so is the intro to it.

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    Re: Noel Redding - Goldmine Interview 1997

    OK, so it was 1997 but Noel never would let it lie, bless his soul. Anyway, just thought I'd highlight this from RR's excellent post:

    "Although you only have a couple of songs on the albums, you were writing quite a lot of material at this time, weren't you?

    Yeah, that's why I did the Fat Mattress album. That was in late '68. I went in and did the first Fat Mattress album, as a writing outlet. People said it was because I was still a frustrated guitarist, and I wanted to go back to playing guitar, but really, it was because I was writing so many songs, and I wanted to get them .out.


    I had two tunes released with Hendrix. There was "She's So Fine," which I wrote at Top.Of The Pops; I wrote it there, and played it to Chas, and he said 'yeah, I like that,' so we did it. And Chas was nearly going to put it out as a single, because it would be a good PR thing to say 'here's a song written by the bass player.' But it didn't happen, I don't think the record company (Polydor) went for it.


    Then there was "Little Miss Strange," which is on Electric Ladyland. That was done in '68, when we were attempting to record the album, and things were falling apart within the band. I went into the studio two days running, and Hendrix didn't even turn up. So I recorded "Little Miss Strange," just me and Mitch, then when Hendrix came in and heard it, he overdubbed the guitar.


    I did some other things. "Dream" and "Touch You" were also recorded during the Electric Ladyland sessions. On "Dream;" I played lead, Hendrix played bass. Then there was "Dance," which was going to have Mitch singing lead, only it didn't really work, so we scrapped it. Hendrix took the riff and turned it into "Ezy Rider." There were a couple of sessions with Stephen Stills, something with Larry Coryell. All that stuff has disappeared, no one knows where it is, apparently. It'll probably all turn up at some point, on a new compilation, but it doesn't really make a difference to me either way, because I don't get any money for any of that stuff.:


    You are joking, of course?

    No. I've never received a penny from the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Sorry, a cent. I get my writing royalties for the two songs I wrote, but I have never received anything from the Experience."

    How does that work?

    It's a long story, read my book! Basically: I was paid off in 1974, 30,000 pounds, and that's it. It sounds a lot, but compared with what the catalog has earned, and is continuing to earn, it's peanuts.


    That was under the old administration, the Alan Douglas crew, of course. Now that the rights to the catalog have gone to Jimi's family, an organization which apparently prides itself on its honesty, ethics, and doing the right thing by ]imi, surely things will change?


    Put it this way. Luckily, I'm still working. Luckily, I can still play."

    Some things will never change it seems. Appears friendship between Noel and Jimi, which continued way after the original JHE split, counted for nothing.
    "That's the best news I ever heard" Bob Dylan

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    Re: Noel Redding - Goldmine Interview 1997

    I can't find it now. I have no idea where I read this. But somewhere I read that the day Jimi died some girls came over to Noel's place and wanted to kill themselves. He said that although he wasn't religious, he took them to church. Then later on that night they went out drinking. I like to think that if Hendrix had lived the original JHE would have got back together for at least a few gigs.

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    Re: Noel Redding - Goldmine Interview 1997

    Quote Originally Posted by Defender007 View Post
    I can't find it now. I have no idea where I read this. But somewhere I read that the day Jimi died some girls came over to Noel's place and wanted to kill themselves. He said that although he wasn't religious, he took them to church. Then later on that night they went out drinking. I like to think that if Hendrix had lived the original JHE would have got back together for at least a few gigs.
    I think Noel said this on the ITV SouthBank Show documentary.

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    Re: Noel Redding - Goldmine Interview 1997

    Quote Originally Posted by Aidan View Post
    I think Noel said this on the ITV SouthBank Show documentary.
    Do you know where I can find this documentary?

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    Re: Noel Redding - Goldmine Interview 1997


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    Re: Noel Redding - Goldmine Interview 1997


    Thanks

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    Re: Noel Redding - Goldmine Interview 1997

    I was just listening to Winterland 10/12/68 2nd show.Jimi had technical problems throughout and during Sunshine Of Your Love let Noel improvise quite a beautiful solo. Check it out if you can.
    Last edited by jhendrixfanatic; 12-18-10 at 10:47 PM.

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    Re: Noel Redding - Goldmine Interview 1997

    Quote Originally Posted by jhendrixfanatic View Post
    I was just listening to Winterland 10/12/68 2nd show.Jimi had technical problems throughout and during Sunshine Of Your Love let Noel improvise quite a beautiful solo. Check it out if you can.
    I'm sure I would appreciate it. I'm a fan of Noel's bass playing and believe he was underrated. Considering that he was providing half the rhythm section for the world's greatest guitarist, I felt his playing was tasteful, balanced and at times innovative. Plus, his timing was outstanding.

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    Re: Noel Redding - Goldmine Interview 1997

    Very fascinating!

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    Re: Noel Redding - Goldmine Interview 1997

    Just discovered this youtube video of the Clonakilty cowboys. Great rythym by Noel and band, great guitar playing by Eric Bell.

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    Re: Noel Redding - Goldmine Interview 1997

    Could not agree less....Redding was just ok...remember, Jimi frequently would wipe Noel's studio stuff, and replace it with his own bass lines!...that was not because Jimi and Noel had their problems getting along, just Jimi knowing that Noel could not deliver the goods as Hendrix wanted...Redding didn't accept the reality that The Jimi Hendrix Experience was just that.....it was never intended to be The Hendrix, Redding, Mitchell Experience...I mean, just think about how far Noel, and Mitch, went on their own talents, after Jimi died.....Chas Chandler considered sacking both of those guys on several occasions.

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