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Thread: 1970-05-01 Milwaukee Auditorium, Milwaukee, Wisconsin USA

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    1970-05-01 Milwaukee Auditorium, Milwaukee, Wisconsin USA

    Friday, May 1st, 1970

    1. Spanish Castle Magic
    2. Lover Man
    3. Hear My Train A Comin'
    4. Ezy Rider
    5. Freedom
    6. Message To Love
    7. Foxy Lady
    8. Star Spangled Banner
    9. Purple Haze
    10. Voodoo Child (Slight Return)



    Last edited by Dolly Dagger; 03-13-11 at 04:45 PM.

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    Re: 1970-05-01 Milwaukee Auditorium, Milwaukee, Wisconsin USA


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    Re: 1970-05-01 Milwaukee Auditorium, Milwaukee, Wisconsin USA


    Last edited by billo528; 04-05-16 at 06:57 PM.

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    Re: 1970-05-01 Milwaukee Auditorium, Milwaukee, Wisconsin USA

    Friday 01 May 1970
    Milwaukee Auditorium, Wisconsin, USA. JHE [II]
    Concert at 20:00
    Tape: audience, 60:00 minutes, reasonable, by unknown
    Support: Oz
    Promoter: Concerts East and Concept Nine Ltd.
    Poster: B&W psyche-ish drawn portrait by Brad Cantwell
    Audience: ~ 3,000

    Songs:

    Spanish Castle Magic (43)
    Lover Man (27)
    Getting My Heart Back Together Again (39)
    Ezy Ryder (18)
    Freedom (13)
    Message To Love (27)
    Foxy Lady (78)
    The Star Spangled Banner (31) (John Stafford Smith [music])
    Purple Haze (87)
    Voodoo Child (Slight Return)

    The Milwaukee Sentinel (02 May) ‘Passions Go Wild With Hendrix Call’ - review by Patti Colla: “Rock singer Jim [sic] Hendrix called the tribe together Friday night. About 3,000 responded, choking the Milwaukee Auditorium to its seating capacity. The night started calmly enough. The Oz, an acid rock band, recounted their version of the Arkansas Train Robbery of 1949. It was loud, yes. But there were some almost ‘quiet’ moments, and ‘Maxene Don’t You Worry’ might also be counted as a ballad.
    AND THEN CAME HENDRIX! You may not like Hendrix. You might not even want to classify his sound as music. But after an hour of it - if your ear drums haven’t collapsed - the vibrations get to you. Most of those in the definitely under 30 crowd stuck closely to their seats, puffing their mod ‘peace pipes.’ Trying to enforce the ‘no smoking’ ordinance turned out to be an impossible task. Guards continuously had to prod a few of the young people back into their seats, away from the stage and Hendrix. The black singer-guitarist had a red, white, and bluish purple scarf tied around his Afro styled hair. The group went wild with ‘Easy Rider’. Some got up and began to do a snake dance. By ‘Foxy Lady’ it went out of its mind into pure, primitive passion. Hendrix invited everyone to stand for an acid rock version of ‘The Star Spangled Banner.’ Sweat glistened on his face, his eyes barely open. A group rushed to the front of the stage, some trying to touch Hendrix. Others held their hand clenched in a fist, or in the ‘V’ sign of peace. Then Hendrix said it was over - that he had to be in Madison the next day. Fury broke loose as the kids shouted for ‘moooooore’ in one long scream, repeated again and again. But it was over and though a few stamped their feet up and down, they eventually streamed out into the cool and relatively quiet night.”

    Kaleidoscope (22 May- 04 June) ‘Hendrix!, zzzzz…..’ - review by unknown: ”Hendrix concert Friday the 1st was a tired affair on Jimi’s part - absolute minimal involvement with the city and audience being performed for and it’s sad to see one of the greatest sliding around in a rut and reduced to “doing gigs” or whatever motions Jimi was going through. Crowd didn’t like the short set and the indifference, either, and after the curtain closed there were a coupla minutes when they might have swung in the direction of trashing the Auditorium - the energy swell didn’t reach upward enough, how ever, and we were left with piss-off and astonishment vibes dissipating out on the street. Oz played a creditable set, and bears watching, esp. if you ever get up to Madison.”

    The Milwaukee Journal () ‘Real Hendrix Lost in Sound’ - review by Jerold J. Jackson: “Noise, noise, noise.
    It was that kind of experience Friday night when the blues-rock sound of Jimi Hendrix and his group blasted through the Milwaukee Auditorium.
    Several thousand fans sat in aisles and stood on seats throughout the performance, responding enthusiastically as Hendrix picked a guitar and sang.
    But Hendrix came off as a tired, noisy blues-rock singer. His voice strained as he sang. The show seemed to be without feeling.
    Hendrix tried to combine the sound of white rock music with that of the black blues and the attempt was disappointing. Rather than create one sound or the other, Hendrix is lost somewhere in between.
    The overamplification of the instruments and the mod style of flashy clothes gave the performance an air of phoniness. Perhaps the real Hendrix sound will come out in a couple of years.
    The Oz, an acid rock group, also appeared.”

    Interview with Scott Finch

    Rob Lewis: What do you remember from the Milwaukee Auditorium show on 1 May 1970? Scott Finch: There was a curtain in front of the stage. They had pulled the curtain after the opening act was done. A band by the name of Oz. There was some shifting around going on behind the curtain. At a certain point you heard someone checking the bass amp... probably the bass player. Then someone tested the bass drums... a few kicks and once around the drum set. Maybe roadies were making sure everything was ready, I don’t know. The crowd was very quiet. Then you suddenly heard just a few notes out of the guitar that sounded like “Who Knows.” It was obviously, beyond any doubt, Jimi Hendrix on the guitar. It could not have been anyone else testing the guitar. It had that tone. It was Hendrix. No one else in the world could sound like that. The place went completely wild at that point. I felt that most of the people had never seen Hendrix before. That was pretty exciting. That was the high point of the show as I remember.
    RL: The next night at Madison was a much better show. [were you there? At both shows? If so, why aren’t you being interviewed?] What [else] do you remember?
    SF: When the curtains finally opened, they started playing. It was really noisy. It sounded like a big blurry mess. At first you could see him fiddling like he was trying to fix his amps to improve the sound. After awhile he just gave up. There was no way lie could come across to the audience and affect people the way he wanted to. So after that, he just went back and turned all three Marshalls up to ten and went through the motions because it just didn’t make any difference. That’s why the best part of the night was the first few notes he hit. Hendrix was still optimistic at that point. He still had that curtain between him and a terrible sounding room. Hendrix came out with “Spanish Castle Magic” or some thing. Big noise right from the start. He stood motionless in one spot...kind of hunched over. He looked down at his feet and pedals during most of the set. Then he would look up to sing. He seemed very depressed.
    RL: Jimi was very ill at that time and probably felt sick. He had some glandular problems at the start of this tour, which would have been at this time. Near the end of this month they cancelled three gigs because he began to feel sick again.
    SF: Well, that was pretty much the whole show. When “Foxy Lady” came along, Out of nowhere, he just started doing somersaults and stuff on stage. Very lackluster, it was amazing that he did it at all be cause you could see that he didn’t feel like doing it... but he did it anyway... like he had to. Just like he had to play those songs. People upfront were screaming, “Foxy Lady, Purple Hazel” He just felt so obligated to play the old stuff.
    RL: It is unconfirmed, but Vic Buff says that Hendrix had a girlfriend sitting in a chair on the stage during this show. Is that true?
    SF: I remember Mitch had a huge drum set and I seem to remember a girl sitting in a very large chair right behind Mitch’s drums throughout the whole show. I don’t know who she was.
    RL: The newspaper articles give this show a bad review.
    SF: I don’t remember an encore... if there was one. It was cool that it was Hendrix. I had already been playing in bands for six years by 1970 myself and had played big ugly auditoriums. I knew what it was like and just figured that he was so bummed out by how it sounded that he just gave up. It was just a big blurry mess.
    [Scott Finch Is a local Milwaukee guitar player/ musician who owns a recording studio.}

    Bob Reitman: “The first time I saw Jimi Hendrix was in downtown Milwaukee in 1968. The venue was a supperclub venue called THE SCENE. Seated maybe 400 people. Jimi and The Experience were animated flashing colors and sounds from a place none of us had ever heard before. He played with an intensity and joyfulness that would stand in sad contrast to what I saw two years later. A different Jimi Hendrix returned to Milwaukee in 1970. I had a chance to meet him back stage after the show and he was a shadow of his former self His smile was gone and he would look around with darting furtive glances as though he was expecting some thing rather frightening to confront him. His music was still great but lacked the joy of earlier times. Whatever happened to Jimi in those two years took him to a scary and pathetic place.” [in 20/20 hindsight. Ed.]
    [Bob Reitman is a Milwaukee radio personality and complete arse who works with WKTI Radio.]
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: 1970-05-01 Milwaukee Auditorium, Milwaukee, Wisconsin USA


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