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Thread: 1968-02-01 The Fillmore, San Francisco, California USA

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    1968-02-01 The Fillmore, San Francisco, California USA

    Thursday, February 1st, 1968
    The Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, California USA - 2 SHOWS
    with Soft Machine, John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, and Albert King


    NO SETLISTS KNOWN
    no recording has surfaced
    Last edited by Dolly Dagger; 04-06-11 at 05:12 PM.

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    Re: 1968-02-01 Fillmore West, San Francisco, California USA

    Last edited by billo528; 04-02-16 at 03:33 PM.

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    Re: 1968-02-01 The Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, California USA

    In late 1967 I joined with some fellow students at Sacramento State College to form a “social club” at the school. It was a rag tag bunch of students; several football players, several music students, and three guys in bands. We called it “The Students for the Appreciation of Pop Music” and our sole purpose was to bring big time rock and roll to Sacramento. Oh, Sacramento had its share of local rock and roll bands, but some of us had worked in a light show all summer at Kings Beach Bowl on the north shore of Lake Tahoe and the bands that played there were the part of the sixties rock explosion; The Grateful Dead, Buffalo Springfield, Moby Grape, Big Brother and the Holding Company, and Quicksilver Messenger Service were a few. We saw the impact they had and we figured that if we could get a big facility in Sacramento like the Men's Gymnasium on campus we could bring some of those acts to the school. Thus we had to form the “social club” to be eligible to use the gym. We had to get an academic sponsor, a professor, which we did; write up a charter, and elect officers. The professor helped us do that and we became a legal entity at the college and immediately got down to business.
    At Tahoe we had done the light shows and hadn't hired the bands but the owner of the Bowl had relied on our suggestions on who to hire and let us deal with the booking agents so were ready to wheel and deal with our connections! We had a meeting, decided how much money we had to start off with and began calling. Our first call turned out to be a winner. Creative Artists Management in Los Angeles had Big Brother and The Holding Company with Janis Joplin open on a Thursday night and we booked them on the spot. It turned out to be a great show since they were rapidly becoming famous and they filled the gym and we banked some money in our “next show” account. I had a hunch it was going to be an exciting time when Chuck Barnett the agent at CMA called me the day before the Janis Joplin show and told me he just got an open date on Jimi Hendrix less than a month after the Joplin show and we could get him at a good price. It would be good for us and Hendrix because they had a hole in their schedule and if we took them it would complete a tour. We went with our collective gut feeling and even though we hadn't produced a show yet, we committed to hiring Jimi and sent the deposit money. Given the short notice Barnett assured me he'd have the signed contracts back to me within a day or so.
    However, as the date grew near we still didn't have the signed contract and the radio stations and newspapers we were advertising with were warning us about a last minute cancellation which would have done us and our bank account in. Therefore, since Jimi was playing on Feb. 1st at the Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco with Albert King and John Mayall and The Blues Breakers, we'd just take a little trip to San Francisco and tell Bill Graham the promoter that we were promoters too so he'd let us in and we'd get Jimi to sign it in person!
    Standing outside the Fillmore after Bill Graham had told us he didn't care if we needed to see Jimi or not; “get in line and buy a ticket, I've got problems of my own”, we were both excited to see Jimi, and apprehensive as to what was going to happen; so far we didn't have a contract and Bill Graham the man who could have taken us directly to the dressing rooms had shot us down! Nevertheless we bought tickets and entered the Fillmore. Once inside we headed right for the dressing room and told the security guard who we were and that we had to pick up the contract. Luckily he went for it and opened the door. Stepping inside my vision swept the smoky room which was full of people. Men and women in regular clothing, others in total hippie attire, several Fillmore staffers and what appeared to be several musicians. It looked like what I had imagined, a true behind the scenes hangout. But, in one corner seated in an overstuffed arm chair was one Jimi Hendrix. He stood out like a sparkling jewel. His colorful clothes, radiating smile and the fair maiden sitting on the arm of his chair formed a perfect picture of a rock star before the show! Of course he knew nothing about any contract but had heard that they were going to Sacramento. “Hey when I get there we can hang out a bit!”
    It was quite a night, Mayall and King were great but Jimi was on his meteoric rise and blew everyone away. We drove home later that February night marveling at what Jimi had done and stopped worrying about the contract! Hey, Jimi said when he got to Sacramento we’d hang out a bit so that was that!!!


    source: http://www.hollywoodhangover.com/htm...ultze_page.htm


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    Re: 1968-02-01 The Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, California USA

    These shows were actually at the Fillmore Auditorium not the Fillmore West.

    Fillmore West was a completely different venue originally called the Carousel Ballroom which was attempted to be owned and operated by Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead. Bill Graham took over the Carousel Ballroom renaming it Fillmore West in July 1968 and ran it through July 1971 and for the most part stopped having shows at Fillmore Auditorium. Some noticeable exceptions such as the December 1969 Grateful Dead shows at what then became known as "The Old Fillmore" while the Fillmore West and East was still in operation until 1971

    The original Fillmore Auditorium was renamed the Elite Club in the early 80s and run by someone else. Bill Graham reopened the original Fillmore in the mid 80's but damage from the 1989 San Francisco Earthquake forced its closure. In 1994 after Bill Graham had died those close to him reopened the original Fillmore Auditorium and it still has bands playing there to this day (although not run by BGP anymore.)

    Fillmore West is now a Honda dealership.

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    Re: 1968-02-01 The Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, California USA

    Last edited by billo528; 04-08-16 at 12:03 PM.

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    Re: 1968-02-01 The Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, California USA

    1968-02-01 - The Fillmore Auditorium - San Francisco
    Partial setlist:

    - Red House
    - Purple Haze
    - Foxy Lady
    - Fire
    - The Wind Cries Mary

    http://jimihendrix.forumactif.org/t2...r-fevrier-1968

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    Re: 1968-02-01 The Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, California USA

    Wolfgang's Vault used to have a pretty good Forum (now no longer there or wiped at some point and started anew) which had a lot of Jimi reviews on it. Because sometimes I enjoy reading hard copies more than electronically I printed hard copies of the forum at some point. I thought I would transcribe some of them here since they are no longer available at Wolfgang's.

    Here is one review in the forum posted by "Al" Tuesday May 10,2011:

    Early Show

    I went to the Thursday show at the Fillmore and the lineup was different with the Soft Machine as the opening act followed by Albert King and then Jimi.

    This is the concert referenced by Albert King in the monumental 1983 "In Session with Stevie Ray Vaughan" recording on Stax Records where Albert tells Stevie to play Jimi's part of "Blues at Sunrise"

    When Albert ended the first set he was met with multiple standing ovations from a stunned audience of Jimi fans who were completely seduced by Albert's classic blues. Finally after several encores Albert begged the audience to let him leave the stage because he was "cuttting into Jimi's set and Jimi was in the wings of the stage getting pissed"

    Jim's set followed and after a couple of songs Jimi just walked off stage. After what seemed like a long time he came back with a Gibson Flying V like Albert was playing and did about half of the set playing smoking hot blues on the Fllying V before returning to his stratocaster and his Experience material for the remainder of the set, playing at times behind his back, between his legs, with his teeth and finally lighting the strat on fire: All reminiscent of his Monterey Pop performance the year before. It was like he needed to win the audience back by proving his blues roots. And he did!

    Jimi also received multiple standing ovations.

    Late Show

    After the intermission The Soft Machine did another improvisation for their second set and Albert King's band started to set up for their second set when Jimi walked onto the stage to talk with Albert. Albert took the microphone and announced that the bands were going to get together for a jam session for the rest of the evening. What transpired was PURE MAGIC as both epic performers traded licks in a monumental jam which included, as the night wore on, guest shots by other bay area musicians like Janis Joplin who were backstage or in the audience.

    This is the performance date I wish you had a copy of. To this day it's probably my favorite concert.
    Last edited by Experiencereunited; 02-24-15 at 10:55 PM.

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    Re: 1968-02-01 The Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, California USA

    Many thanks for preserving! Sounds like one of the concerts for my "wish I was there"-list!

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    Re: 1968-02-01 The Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, California USA

    Quote Originally Posted by Experiencereunited View Post
    Here is one review in the forum posted by "Al" Tuesday May 10,2011:
    Thanks, but no thanks. What happened to the Bluesbreakers? Sounds like the usual 40 odd years too late, wildly exaggerated bollocks (complete with flaming guitar!) by a fantasist who probably never even saw the band.
    Last edited by stplsd; 04-05-16 at 07:38 PM.
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: 1968-02-01 The Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, California USA

    I would expect no different response from you STPLSD because apparently in your view most people just enjoy talking shit when it comes to Jimi and unless you can document it yourself it can't possibly be legit. Jimi played a lot in the bay area yet there is still a lot that we don't know about those shows except from eyewitnesses. I posted this one because it felt legit. There are many others from that forum that I was like WTF?
    Last edited by Experiencereunited; 02-27-15 at 10:02 PM.

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    Re: 1968-02-01 The Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, California USA

    Nearly the entire 1st JHE US “tour”, ‘The British Are Coming’ (Soft Machine roady, Hugh Hopper: “the ’68 nightmare tour”), was done in two months (The San Francisco gigs were a 4 night residency, they were not moving ie “touring”), the tour proper only started on 5th in Tempe (Phoenix), Jimi was back home in New York on the 3rd April so 5th Feb - ended 2nd April, 40 cities in 58 days (43 cities in 66 days – if you must) Mitch exaggerated it to “40 cities in under 50 days” and then “49 cities in 52 days and “We were doing two shows a night,” as if that was the norm, which it wasn’t.), the most in February ([29 nights] 18 different cities (Anaheim is just a suburb of L.A., 19 if you count S.F.); 21 dates (25 if you count S.F.), so no gigs on 4 nights); 22 shows (30 if you count S.F.) – ie Anaheim (ie ‘L.A.’ They likely stayed at the same hotel in L.A. for four nights, only interrupted by their brief trip to Seattle and back) was the only 2 show gig on the ‘tour’ proper in February. Of these gigs on the ‘tour’ proper (ie not including the 4 night residency in San Francisco), 3 cities were two night gigs, so no travelling between gigs on three nights and the two nights they played in Arizona they most likely spent in the same hotel in Phoenix (Tucson was 2 hours travel by station wagon from Tempe - a suburb of Phoenix). The rest were in March ([31 nights] 18 cities, 18 dates (so no gigs on 13 nights), 24 shows – ie only 6 dates were two show gigs) & April (4 cities, 4 dates, 5 shows – ie only 1 date was a two show gig. Jimi was back home in NYC on the 3rd anyway).
    This “tour” finished over a week before the ELL sessions began.
    For Jimi, a ‘New Yorker’, back in his home town the 1st US ‘Experience’ “tour” finished after the gig in Montreal, from where he flew back to his home in NYC (wherever he ‘laid his hat’ - usually a suite in the Drake Hotel it seems)
    Noel: “The PPX mess prevented any royalties being paid.”
    Any US earnings from Hendrix’ US Reprise recordings were being held in escrow pending the settlement of the Chalpin case in June and were likely not released until Yameta was finally ditched in December and were therefore unavailable to all parties. His UK Track Records monies were, it seems, also held in escrow until that case was settled in 1973, so he didn’t see much cash from Track ever, unless it was an advance.
    Jimi had returned to live in the US again, it was Jimi’s home, New York had been his chosen ‘home town’ for years, he was not a visitor like the rest of them. He had already been back home in the US for more than two months (‘the Summer of love’) in 1967, much of it spent back in his home town, New York. He only ever visited Europe - the UK was not his home, he was only based in London (UK) for about nine months of his life - as a career move. He was back home again after another visit to Europe (four months only), again based in London, to record the Axis LP and play some Scandinavian gigs. He spent almost all of his life and musical career in the US, his famous musical career was mostly based in New York - apart from his 9 month ‘star’ creation in London/UK - he was back in the US and his ‘home town’ New York again in time for ‘the Summer of Love’ 1967. This ’68 “tour” was only Mitch and Noel’s second visit to the USA. They never really left their ‘England’, often returning to re-connect with “their [English home] life”. For them 1968, apparently, seemed like one long ‘tour of duty’ which the pathetic, commercial ‘Rock world’ following Jimi’s (so sad that he commired suicide because of his evil manager, or hinting at it untimely death, has also attempted to graft on to how Jimi felt, as if he was English! All these shite English stories about what Jimi would have wanted! Puke! (see above, a ‘New Yorker’). Mike his other manager [Chas was like Mitch & Noel, never could stand leaving the confines of ‘England’ for too long] and Jimi’s favourite engineer Kramer (a ‘Jewish’ South African ‘refugee’ from its bigotry had also moved there, full time). The whole set up with the, just opened, Record Plant sounds like, “This was organised with Jimi in mind as he has assured us he will be be living here permanently.”
    Mitch and Noel’s second visit to the USA. After their arrival in February 1968 they returned to the UK, or abroad for holidays, for weeks and months at a time and went back to England again from 3-12-68 – 21-03-69, ie nearly 4 months, during which they only played a 15 date tour (5 dates in Scandinavia and crossing the border they continued with a further 10 dates in West Germany), two weeks after that they played 1 show in London and another a week later.
    Mitch: “We went back to America in February 1968, with The Soft Machine and at some stage, The Eire Apparent. An all-Mike Jeffery [& Chas Chandler, don’t forget his business partner Chas Ed.] package. I didn't know The Soft Machine too well at that stage. I'd seen them at the UFO club in London and had met them in the Gerrard Street office [Track Records. Ed.] a few times, and I liked them and their music, but that was about it. I know Hendrix thought very highly of them — a great band. Night after night they never lost their impetus. It was always a challenge to them, especially some places in the Mid-West, where it wasn't really their audience. They were a hard act to follow, every night. We were doing two shows a night on the tour and had to get up at seven o'clock in the morning.” [Noel has the less exaggerated, but still rubbish, ‘eight’. How often would they have had to get up at that time? not a lot, if ever, it’s not like they were flying to Japan or Australia. Most flights were around an hour, the longest time the musicians spent travelling between gigs – door to door - was three hours, unless you count flying from Paris to New York City (2 nights no gigs), NYC to S.F. and Houston (TX) to NYC (2 nights no gigs. Ed.]
    “This was the time where i’-you know. It was his time. Of going back to New York after doing the ‘chitlin circuit’ and the times he would go to New York where, you know, just too... it wasn’t really under his own terms, you know. Of going doing the ‘Cafe Wha?’ and really struggling in Greenwich Village. I mean, now, y’know, the guy is back under his own terms [he’d already done that in the summer of ‘67. Ed.] and I can’t say, you know, [...] He decided to make it a base [ie ‘back in his home town (from winter 1963/64) again’. Ed.].
    Eddie: “Jimi at this point feels, ‘Wow! I’m in New York. This is my real spriritual home.” [He apparently felt that from winter 1963/64 when he moved there Ed.]
    Neville: “We did something like nine weeks.” [very close, they did 3 days over the nine - if you count Jimi staying in New York as him “touring” Ed.] “. . . days off, maybe four or five days.” For Neville that is, the boys had much more – only 4 days off in the 4 weeks of Feb., but 13, ie nearly two weeks, in March and they only had to play four more “tour” dates in April and two of them were in nearby NJ and NY state, when they were back staying in New York again! After which Noel & Mitch went back to England for a week’s holiday, before beginning the sessions for ELL at the Record Plant.
    “I have in my diary, maybe, 19,000 miles of driving alone,” (ie average 288 mp day – if he drove every day with no days off!? Gear was obviously shipped by air sometimes - eg to Seattle and Philadelphia).” Even if we allow for some exaggeration, it was very tough on Neville. But he did have a partner – Soft Machine’s Hugh Hopper and they could have shared the driving, but, according to Hopper, Neville chose to do it all. No doubt why he went back to London at the end of this 1st tour, burnt out, never to return. The boys, Gerry and Abe (when he was there, about a month – according to him) though were flying between most gigs.

    Hugh Hopper: “I was at school with Robert Wyatt and I was in a band [the Wilde Flowers] here in Canterbury with Robert, which then split up into Soft Machine. [The Wilde Flowers] continued in Canterbury slightly different. And Robert left with Kevin. But they were actually doing songs of mine anyway... that we played as Wilde Flowers... and then about one year after they’ve been in London, I think, Robert asked me if I wanted to be a Soft Machine roady , because their roady had left... [but] I was involved with them anyway, musically and as friends.
    Hendrix had one roady who was Neville Chesters. And Soft Machine had one roady, which was me. I had to set up Soft Machine’s gear and also both of us loaded all the gear. To start there was only one load of gear, there was only one lot of Fender amps... At the beginning of the tour Fender actually provided, I think, something like three or four amps, which had to be used for both bands, which was not a good situation. And in fact Neville wasn’t told this ‘til we were getting on the plane... It could have been disastrous. In fact it was fairly disastrous anyway, because it wasn’t the right gear for Hendrix. It was too clean and not enough orbit... He did most of the driving, mainly because he could only drive when he was on speed. If he didn’t have speed he sort of kept hitting the side, but he wouldn’t let me drive because he was the chief roadie. He was a nice guy in some ways but he was also very kind of obsessed by some things... He was very conscientious. He really sort of cared... We always got to a gig late but I mean he cared whereas I didn’t really care. I [was] only just doing it ‘cause I was working for friends...
    Gerry was actually the guy that kept that tour together... In fact if it hadn’t been for him, well.. [it] could easily have been a real disaster... As it was, it was kind of limping along... Because it was very thrown together. And we started off with a few gigs and most of them were changed [See some of the early bookings below. Ed.]. But then more and more [were] added as Hendrix became more and more known... But I always thought, compared with today when you have a road crew, thirty at least, three trucks, lighting. I mean it’s a joke, two people! One person for Hendrix, one person for Soft Machine... We started out first of all flying the gear. But this was before [the] flightcase stage. So in fact a lot of the things got broken, amplifiers got smashed; so in the end it wasn’t worth flying. So we had to drive, so it meant driving overnight to the next gig... We were always late, every gig. I think we never were on time at all. Because it was such long distances...
    It wasn't technically very difficult. It was just very hard long hours... In fact, nothing much really went wrong with the gear, except that things would be completely smashed in an airplane, so that was gone... so, no, in fact a lot of things kept going... and also during the tour more and more equipment got added. I mean, we started with very little equipment. Not enough. We ended up with about three times that. And various people would actually give us equipment on the way... By the end of the tour it meant that we had a truck full of stuff whereas before we had, sort of, a small truck half empty... There were times when I'd been actually loading this gear that I had taken out of the truck only a couple of hours before, loading in at 1 o'clock in the morning in this strange place, in the middle of nowhere in America, you know, to go somewhere else. Some nights we checked into the hotel maybe for an hour just to get a shower... So I was really starting to get disorientated and feeling strange...
    Occasionally in a big theatre there would be a sound person or a lighting officer... it was nothing like today...
    [The pay] was not very much. I started off on a 100 dollars a week [ie over $1,000 equivalent today & tax free no doubt! Ed.]. There weren't many expenses....and Neville was very generous. He liked to pay for my hamburgers! It was part of his thing, you know... We were always complaining 'cause it was so hard, so difficult to actually get to the gig and set it up...the two of us...so eventually the management put it up to 150 dollars [$1,500] a week...

    Neville: “I probably gave him a bit of a hard time. He is a very nice guy. On the road there are not that many people that I could get on with.”

    Noel: “We’d play in, sort of, like, eh, Toronto one night, an ‘en Texas the next night an’ ‘en New York an’ then Seattle and then, eh, Florida. It wasn’t planned, it was silly, really. [this is just bullshit, they never did anything like that. It was Texas first, (logically arriving via Denver, after their West Coast sojourn), the four separate gigs there ended February 14, then two days and two nights off in New York, then two nights at the one club in Philadephia (ie no travelling between gigs one day) to which they were driven in a station wagon by Gerry (82 miles). They then flew 445 miles to Detroit and then flew 238 miles to Toronto (24th) (then flew 235 miles to Chicago etc. ie three of a six gig series all in the Great Lakes area). They didn’t play Florida until 18 MAY!, just one of only three gigs (Troy (NY); New York & Miami each separated by over a week) they played during a 45 day lay off from ‘gigging’, they didn’t leave until 21st., when Noel flew to England]

    Mitch: “I-I have a certain amount of bitterness ab’-especially this-is-for, for my friend Jimi. It’s giant stupidity you can’t do that, you must take some time off to write for the record. You can’t do two, you know, or three things ha-ha, or four things at the same time.” [That’s why Jimi took a load of time off from gigging to record Axis and even more to record ELL. Ed.]

    “I think it’s giant stupidity from-from management point of view, from agents point of view [ie from Mitch’s ‘point of view’, obviously not the management’s. Ed.]. You know, y-y-you’ve got plans going from one side of America to another [yes, that is the object of the exercise Mitch. It’s a very wide country so when you were touring you travelled from one side to the other], an’, you know, more or less, you-you’re supposed to be grateful because, [parodies Chas’ Geordie accent], ‘’Ey, in my day used to be on a Greyhound Boos’ [actually Mike Jeffery (with Chas and the Animals) pioneered playing gigs in the US by ‘plane, instead of “touring” ie ‘on the road’, one town after another, day after day by bus/train. Ed.].

    “It wasn't quite thrust down our throats, but it was made clear to us that we were lucky to be travelling by plane. Hendrix never said much about it, because he'd been raised on doing the Greyhound bus circuit, all over America. Every other English band up to us, I suppose, had done that as well. Not many people were flying around. I suppose it was luxury of a sort. However, after doing a gig and being a silly lad partying all night and getting an hour's sleep, to be woken up at seven with a plane to catch didn't go down too well.
    I had a routine of checking into a hotel and taking these two great big bolts with me, which I would attach to the door. I then took the phone off the hook. Frequently they had to call the fire brigade to break down the door to get me up, but it did get the flight times altered. It was ridiculous: on the first half of that tour with The Soft Machine we did over 40 cities in under 50 days [actually 40 cities in 58 days. Ed.].

    Trixie Sullivan: “And they’d [‘they’ ie Chas & Mike. Ed.] put him on at one side of the country for one day and you’re supposed to be at 3,000 miles away the next day to do another gig. [That never happened, they always had two days between shows that were very far apart, apart from the first Seattle gig.] ‘They’ (inc. Jimi?) decided to begin the tour on the West Coast and work their way back East to Texas, flying from there to their base, Jimi’s ‘home’ town, in New York, no doubt for what seemed a very good reason, so they had to fly the 2,572 miles, 5 hours, to San Francisco (for their 4 night residency). The only other times they flew particulary long distances was (after their West Coast sojourn) from Texas - 1413 miles, 4 hours 15 min. - to get back to their base (Jimi’s ‘home town’) in N.Y., but they had two days between gigs, and during their West Coast visit when they flew the 940 miles from their base in L.A. to Seattle when they also had two days between gigs and, logically, worked their way back down the West Coast to L.A. again. Ed.]
    No one seemed to think of a schedule where he could go from one place to the other, quite, in a normal manner [‘normal’ manner, ie spending days on the road plodding along by bus or train between gigs, sometimes playing gigs that don’t pay much, just because the town happened to be en route and/or choice venues were unavailable; instead of being based in New York, mostly, playing choice gigs for top dollar and flying between gigs (2 hrs max usually) which enabled them to spend loads of time inbetween in New York (and L.A. when on the West Coast); visiting Europe and having weeks and months off from gigging at a time].

    Kevin Ayers [in Uncut magazine, no doubt having been presented with their meaningless scribble of a map as if a fact by Uncut, (no dates and all joined up without reference to sequence, designed to make these three separate “tours” (the Softs were only on two) look like one continuous insane mess)]: "I think whoever booked the tour from an office in London [Jeffery & Chandler had an office in New York and used US booking agents, most of the gigs were booked after they had arrived in the US and several early dates booked while the team were in London were changed] had absolutely no idea of the geography of the USA and the vast distances required to travel from one state to the other. [Jeffery, Chandler & Hendrix, all veterans of touring the US, new exactly what was involved. Ed.] It was as if the VW logo was drawn on a map of America and there it was the itinerary." [yes, that pretty much sums up the pathetic Uncut “map” Kev. Kevin (much as I have enjoyed his music and relaxed charm) of course had never been to the US before, and had no idea about touring as he’d hardly played any gigs and most of those were around London. He sabotaged his own career as he didn’t like playing concerts, or doing anything else, apart from writing, for long periods, preferring to lie around in exotic countries getting wrecked – which sounds good to me]

    Chas: “As an artist is generating publicity his album is going up the chart, your first section of the tour might be in two or three thousand seater auditoriums, the next section might be in five thousand seaters, by the time we finished that 68 thing we were doing big arenas and state fairs… and we were picking up, like, a hundred thousand bucks a night by the end of that tour.” [ie no point in planning gigs too far ahead, they will hopefully be needing larger venues and negotiating higher fees as time goes on. Ed.]

    Kevin Ayers: “Two months [Kev got that bit right - nearly. Ed.] non-stop – a real bash. We did top to bottom, coast to coast. I don’t think there was a main city we didn’t play. Punishing itinerary? Not at that age. You can do anything when you’re 20. I remember the poor roadies used to have to set off after having broken down the gear at about three in the morning and then be there for the next gig, having driven 600 miles or something, tanked up with speed or whatever. They needed something.”

    Hugh Hopper: “Roger Mayer was supposed to be the electronic wizard, so he showed up for a couple of big gigs and then cleared off and didn’t do a thing [apart from] having a good time .... he didn’t do anything. He just came over on the strength of having built Hendrix’ Octavia.

    Neville: “The electronic boffin! Strange guy... He was very straight, didn’t fit in. He was very normally dressed and we weren’t... He did bits and pieces to guitars... Because he was boffin it was difficult to actually appreciate what he was doing. I think we were all afraid that if we got this electronic gadgetry going, that was going to mean more problems. But of course Jimi didn’t see it that way, he insisted, "Roger brought his new toy along and it sounds good, I have to have this."

    Roger Mayer: “We were all-eh walking wrecks, you know. You can’t be doing 50-60 flights in thirty days and not be tired.”
    [Roger it seems had never been out of England before. Their first month of the 1st “tour”, by far the busiest period they ever had (they never did anything like that again), they did 20 cities in 29 days. They had to travel between cities, so 21 journeys max! Most were flights but several were close enough for Gerry to drive the three by station wagon (roomy, three seats in the front), which he did. Nearly the entire month was spent on the West Coast, before, logically, heading back East for some gigs in Texas via Denver, followed by a flight to New York. Of course all that partying on the West Coast probably took it’s toll; Average 1-2 hours on a plane, followed by a 45 minute show, my heart bleeds!]
    What would Roger Mayer (never accompanied a band anywhere previously, nevermind toured), or any of the Brits on this know about “touring” the US? (outside of the UK, ie mostly in & around London!: Kevin Ayers - Soft Machine had played a short residency in a club in St. Tropez, France. On their first US visit, Mitch & Noel had only played a few gigs in New York; California (5 cities); a week’s residency in Washington, a gig in Ann Arbour (MI), and 4 cities down south with the Monkees travelling in luxury. Prior to that, Redding, the most ‘experienced’ had played a few venues in West Germany and Mitch had played a couple of shows at the Star Club in Hamburg and an awards show in Montreux with Georgie Fame) They'd hardly been outside the tiny confines of the UK. I think it's they that didn't understand the geography, nevermind the available venues, different demographics, the speed, the money, and Hendrix' involvement (it was his tour too, unless you want to accept that he was merely an incommunicado pawn - he was also an American who had previously toured all over the States & Canada (even to Bermuda), as had Chas, Mike having organised the Animals previous US tours. These THREE, knew what was involved and what was going on behind the scenes. Let's face it, the rest were basically employees, Jimi did not discuss business with them, unless pressured, mainly by Noel, with whom he would just trot out his, "Oh, I have no control it's all down to Jeffery” flim-flam, and with whom he eventually grew tired, leading to Jimi, for all intents and purposes, sacking him) etc. etc.
    Noel: “Jimi must have known more about what was going on than he let on.” [For sure and the boss wasn’t going to be seriously discussing his financial business with his, not hugely talented, and often annoying bass player either. Ed.]

    Mark Boyle [‘Sensual’/’Sense’ (depending on percieved puritanism of particular state) Laboratory’ light show. 1st 1968 “tour”]: “This guy Mike Jefferys, who managed us all, was a remakable guy, and he and Jimi had figured out, I think, that to tour a band around the United States using air transport was really not that much different from touring it round London using road transport.[Mike had already worked that out with the Animals’ US tours earlier, and, following in his footsteps, the Who’s managers Stamp & Lambert did this with the Who [mainly Stamp. Lambert was a curiously Eurocentric combination of Chas & Mike, but that didn’t extend to organising US tours/business though, which appears to have been Stamp’s forte]

    Hugh Hopper: “Mark Boyle was very pro Mike Jeffery. Because Mike Jeffery supported him a lot... you never heard a word against Mike Jeffery. He thought he was a great guy.”

    Noel: “Following Steve Weiss’ advice, to self-promote and save the agent’s percentage. Instead of doing tours, we were performing a series of huge one-off concerts.”

    Noel: “The logic of touring by ‘plane meant that geographical proximity was unimportant.”

    Rick Derringer: “Jimi would do a gig somewhere out in the United States and fly home in time to-eh, get in to The Scene, because they didn’t even close the doors until four a.m. [ie chucking out time was later]

    Hugh Hopper: “As much as I saw Hendrix [not a lot apparently. Ed.], Hendrix wasn’t out to partying... because on the road it usually was hotel, hotel, hotel, so during the day Hendrix wouldn’t get up until Gerry Stickells woke him up [‘cause he’d been up half the night partying?]. Neville used to say that on the first tour he was known as ‘the bat’ [Neville was only with the JHE for their last couple of gigs on their 1st ‘visit’ to the US. Ed.], ‘cause he was always in his dark room and had his clothes on. I wouldn’t really see Hendrix until half an hour before he was due to go on, you know. Gerry Stickells was the guy who’s had the problem of waking them all up... I don’t know how he did it... he was certainly the guy who held that tour together. Everybody was smoking obviously, that was normal. I think things like speed, acid. I think that’s as much as there was. I certainly don’t think there was any heroin... I could not even remember if I ever saw Hendrix smoking but I’m sure he must have done, everybody did... I remember Mitch always seemed to be awake during the night and asleep during the day and he always said he was on downers during the day and uppers during the night, which I don't know if it's true... in fact the best time we saw Noel play was when he had obviously drunk a bit more than usual but was not incapable and he played like a dream and he was sort of fluid and all that... There wasn't any kind of crazy, sort of ‘over the top’ things. Certainly not before a concert...
    The few times I actually travelled with him and flying he’d be kind of distantly, sort of obviously thinking about things like [lyrics]... always feeling, sort of digging things...he was really kind of a quiet guy actually in public, in most occasions. He was very kind of within himself and digging things from a distance...He was never kind of a raving party-goer like Noel and Mitch... Noel always seemed to be like a kid. He liked jokes and he liked, sort of, practical jokes and playing tricks on you...but Mitch is a sharp guy, he is really kind of intelligent and witty and sharp, sardonic, so I can see that Noel would actually get on [Jimi’s] nerves...
    I only remember Hendrix saying very few things to me. I mean things like, ‘Hey, hey, where’s my guitar?’ because often he wouldn’t have a guitar with him, he’d just arrived from the hotel, ‘Hey, hey, where’s my guitar?’

    Gerry Stickells: “I think the funniest thing that happened with the group is that, you know, I’d get up in the morning to get ‘em to go and catch a plane, an’ they’d all get up, then they’d sit in their rooms and, say, ‘Well, is so and so down stairs?’ I’d say, ‘No-no he’s not down yet,’ ‘Well, I’m not coming down ‘til he’s down,’ then the other’d say, ‘Well, I’m not coming down ‘til he’s down.” So you’d have three of them sitting in their rooms an’ I’d try to lie to one of ‘em and say the other one’s down there, you know-huh-huh. So they’d all just stay in bed until the rest were ready and they’d come runnin’ down.”

    Chas [veteran of several US tours]: “When you’re in a band and you’re on a roll you don’t get tired. You don’t get tired from touring, you get tired from partying.”
    “I think pressure is an overused word in the industry. What’s a musician really doing?
    Doing what he wants to do more than anything else in the world. Where the hell is the pressure in that?”
    [Well, there could be many pressures, especially if you’re THE STAR & a major songwriter (unlike any of the Animals, who mostly just played cover versions) and not just the bass player. But still, he does have a point. Ed.]

    Kevin Ayers: “Yeah – we used to knock around together. . . Not on a regular basis: It was far too punishing for me. I couldn’t cope with the intake or the hours [of partying] that they [JHE] did, every night and every day... [Jimi] was a leader, but he was led quite easily by other people of a similar stature. He was led by fast talkers and people with nice pockets, and packets of nice things in their pockets.”

    Noel: “We all coped in different ways. I’d go to a bar. Jimi’d retreat to his room, sitting with the shades drawn and a scarf over the light, storing up energy. So we’d call him ‘The Bat’. I also called him ‘Henpecked’. He called me ‘Bob Dylan’s grandmother’. Besides ‘Mitch Miller’, Mitch was ‘Julie Andrews’ or ‘Queen Bee’.”

    Going to bed at four [ie your choice, Noel Ed], getting up at eight [Mitch exaggerated this to seven! How often would they have had to get up at that time? not a lot, it’s not like they were flying to Japan or Australia. Ed.]… getting on two aeroplanes [ie: one there and one to the next gig (usually the next day) unless you want to stay where you are! Ed.], doing another show [that is the object of the exercise. Ed.], doing a press reception in the afternoon [Yeah? Like one only in the Copter club at the start, you mean. Jimi did the interviews anyway. Ed.]. You get half an hour off, you can go get a hamburger. [Well, you will stay up all night partying! Ed.] Gig, club, bed, aeroplane… for about three months.” [more like two months only and that was that. Ed.]

    “It was impossible to stay straight [unless you said, ‘No thanks I’m off to bed’ - eh? Ed.] We would awake stoned after a short nights’ sleep [top tip, ‘go to sleep earlier’ Ed.] and begin the cycle again. Everywhere we went we given handfuls of various substances which... we did out best to consume [!! Ed.]...There was an endless stream of new highs [DMT? MDA? ‘Angel Dust’. Ed.]. We [bought] an amount of lovely Columbian grass which we carried in an airline bag. Before each landing, I’d...skin up. The second we were in the limo, we lit a joint each. We mixed chemicals so badly. Knowing there were only a few hours to squeeze a night’s sleep into.[‘cause you’d been up all night partying. Ed.]...so a few drinks and a sleeper sped you on your way. But ‘plane time would come long before the sleeper wore off, hence the leapers. But the flights are terribly boring when you’re up, so a creeper rounds off the edges and a lot of drink takes a lot of the cotton wool out of your mouth. But booze (well over a bottle of vodka a day now) makes life a bit grim, so ‘just a bit’ of acid makes you feel all tingly and good. But it’s hard to concentrate on acid, so a quick sniff of coke....brings the brain briefly to attention while you smoke some grass or hash to take the nerviness out of the coke. Then, as you’re beginning to feel a bit tacky by the time the flight’s over, the hotel is found, and it’s gig time: a bath, a snort of methedrine and a big tobacco joint puts you on stage. Repeat as neccessary. As a result, I was a bit tired most of the time [ha-ha-ha! Ed.].”

    “The drink (vodka and beer), smoke (grass, hash, opium), psychedelics (acid, mescalin [& DMT? MDA? Angel Dust?. Ed.]), leapers (amphetamines, methedrine, dexydrine etc.) and creepers (miscellaneous tranquilisers) and other various pills made me feel constantly flu-ish as I got more rundown.

    Mitch: “Miami” (actually Hallandale) [‘1968] Pop Festival’. We were booked for two shows Saturday afternoon and evening. We’d been out partying the night before, got to bed about seven [a.m.], so by the afternoon show, we were pretty tired. Anyway this guy comes along and says, ‘Hey guys, I’ve got a little something to perk you up,’ and through foolishness, Hendrix and I accepted. We thought it was some sort of speed or amphetamine to give us some extra energy, but it turned out to be some sort of hallucinogenic.”

    Mitch: “Contrary to what some people have said, Jimi was never a junkie — that is he was never addicted to any drug, particularly heroin, which he had tried once or twice but didn't like. Also there is no truth in the story that our management ever forced dope down Jimi's throat. Drugs were certainly consumed in those days by bands on the road many of the same drugs used by millions of housewives and businessmen. They did become a way of life. Even if you tried to avoid yourself some asshole would come along and spike your drink. It was very hard to get away from.”

    Neville: “I suspect [there was] a lot [of drugs around]... We all had our own little set ups. The main thing that I ever took drugs for was to keep awake. I never saw any evidence of anything like heroin, there was coke about certainly, and lots of other things, poppers, loads of uppers. Everybody had it in those days and most of the people who followed the Experience... I was never aware of Jimi drinking a great deal, he did have bouts of it, but he didn't drink half as much as Noel. Noel drinks continuously. There was a stage where we were signed up with Dr. Roberts [sic, James Robertson] in Harley Street and prior to going anywhere Mitch used to go and get his stocks. And he had an airline bag, a shoulder airline bag, and he had three compartments in it... I couldn't tell you what they were but he had all kinds of stuff in there. He had uppers for leapers, downers for sleepers and Mogadon for creepers... And presumingly in effect it was all legal 'cause he used to take it with him everywhere through the customs. It was all on prescription.... I think [he specialised in pop stars], he seemed to me like probably ten or twenty [years] older than we were...[no trouble getting stuff from him] within reason, Mitch seemed to do okay! The airline bag went everywhere - the pills cabinet! That was really quite amusing.”

    “I had to help [Gerry] with getting the boys up... They were bloody dreadful to organise. Jimi would lock the door and all you could get from him was groans and moans... From Mitch you'd get abuse and from Noel you'd get all kinds of things. I mean the number of times I've put Noel to bed and I thought that other people in that state would have been dead. There was very little movement. I've worried about him when I sometimes put him to bed and the next morning he was bright and breezy. Most strange! Mitch used to be like a bloody bear with a sore head, it wasn't good to upset Mitch. I think I rather would have upset Jimi than upset Mitch.”

    Kevin Ayers: “It, it was more than, more than drugs it was, ehm, a movement. To ask questions and the drugs were part of that, because it opened up parts of your brain that hadn’t been explored before. They were called mind-expanding [‘psychedelic’, actually, ‘mind-manifesting’. Ed.] and that’s exactly what, what it did, if you didn’t abuse it, you know. It just made you see things another way.”

    “LSD. I mean you can’t play on acid [depends how it hits you at the time. Some have performed their most brilliant work: art, athletics, play etc. on acid, it can be a huge boost or a huge disaster. Jimi was allegedly on Owsley at Monterey as was Carlos Santana at Woodstock. Ed.]. As Syd Barrett found out, ehm. But yes, it does make your mind work in a way that-eh, you’re not taught at school.”

    [There you have it, straight from the horse’s mouth: all partied out! There are many tapes, photo’s, interviews, quotes, diary entries etc. to show that the lads all enjoyed a drink (especially Noel!), not to mention dope/acid/coke etc., staying up half/all of the night clubbing/jamming/partying/shagging etc. I would have too, best to make the most of it before it’s too late Ed.]

    Kevin Ayers: "By Jimi inviting us on that tour we had this amazing exposure that we never had before.”

    “I was with the same management. I was signed to Mike Jeffery as a songwriter before Soft Machine. He was a weird guy, Jeffery.
    [We were worried that Chas and Mike were going all out for Hendrix and might not keep their interest in us. But they did.] Hendrix said, ‘It’s fine with me,’ or something like that. He liked us, because we were weird. Weird and very white. We weren’t like a rock ‘n’ roll band and absolutely no threat of any kind. Not that he’d worry about that. And we were cheap.”

    Hugh Hopper: “The basic reason [Soft Machine was on the tour] was because it was part of the same management... There was no way you would be on it [otherwise]. Because that tour consisted of about six bands... Hendrix and us, there was the Animals and Eire Apparent, Alan Price... I mean it was an Anim agency [ie ‘Jeffery & Chandler Inc.’ Ed.] tour... Most of the time it was just Hendrix and Soft Machine going around. And there was the Animals and Eire Apparent on another circuit. Sure, obvious if Hendrix hadn't liked the band then there was no way he would have allowed it, or he would have made it heavy...”

    Robert Wyatt: “I don't remember a single conversation about [how Soft Machine got onto the tour]! It's more like being a private in the army, you're not at the generals’ [ie Mike & Chas. Ed.] discussions of strategy...”

    Kevin Ayers: “I don't remember the tours [ie plural, they were on, most of, two, separated by 4 months. But not on the third, in November – 13 cities, 13 dates, 13 shows. Then JHE took December through the first week in January 1969 off, ie 37 nights. Noel & Mitch spent theirs in the UK, Noel had a brief jaunt to Majorca. Ed.] I was usually pretty drunk and out of it. But I can't remember anybody who wasn't excited by Jimi Hendrix. An audience is an audience, they either give you feedback or they don't. He just came on like no one else did at that time, it was just in his presence.
    Jimi was always very social. He had a nice sense of humour. I had dinner with him on occasion. He liked male friends as much as he liked girlfriends. Mainly our relationship was always sort of a dressing room relationship. It did get a bit further sometimes. I think we talked about everything. He wasn't that articulate, he was often tongue tied. But he'd put things in a way that would just dazzle you, forget all the intellectual crap, he'd just go 'zoom' and we'd go 'Yeah, right Jimi!'
    My guitar playing is definitely influenced by him. He had a unique rhythmic approach that we'd never heard before. When I first saw him I was in my early twenties. What he did, he did uncompromisingly. He thought 'normality' was very boring, much as I do. And he was prepared to pay the price. He just went for it and said, 'This is how I'm going to be and whatever happens happens.
    I was too dazzled to be critical. We were young kids from England. We never felt intimidated by his amazing power at that time, we could easily have been intimidated though, because it was really strong. When you're there, especially at that young age, it's just a travelling circus. I was personally affected by Jimi Hendrix's magic. It was just a very immediate contact, it was very obvious that this guy was magic. The secret of Jimi Hendrix, apart from his innate talent and presence, was he was just somebody who was just so intense and had no sense of compromise at all. We all knew that he was going to go out fast. It's the kind of intensity that everybody dreams about but no one dares do it. Or dares to follow. Most people take risks conditionally, they have something to fall on, he was not in the least bit calculated, he just went for it.”

    Robert Wyatt: “With Hendrix neccessity became the mother of whatsit, because they didn’t really have many tunes. They had ‘Hey Joe’ and a couple of other things, so they would really extend them. But at the same time, what was great about Hendrix was that he didn’t like long boring gutar solos. He wasn’t a grandstanding type, really. He always wanted to keep things shifting and changing.”

    "He was an old-fashioned entertainer in a way. If you were playing in a very loose club filled with wise guys and hipsters in New York, he would go as far out as it was possible to go. But if you were playing in some aircraft hangar in Texas in front of 14,000 15-year-olds, he'd play the hits, and keep it crisp. He was very conscientious like that. He wasn't a theorist, he didn't sit around talking about it.”

    “I think that people underestimated the importance of say Mitch on drums. Mitch’s reputation preceded him, he was already a heavy weight... He was very fluid, he would just kind of 'swoop and dive' along with Hendrix, so that it all helped to make this kind of swirly atmosphere instead of that kind of ploddy atmosphere that most rock bands have...
    I didn't expect it. You don't expect it in pop groups. You don't have to be a very good musician to be a good rock musician [!]. Mitch was holding the sticks right! In the end I start holding them wrong - you can break rules when you know them- and a lot of people thought, "well you can't if you play rock 'cause it's too loud", but he did...
    [Mitch and Noel] both had their role I always compare it with the John Coltrane Quartet - it is very important that the bass player and the pianist stepped into these very simple anchor points... I don't think Noel's interested in improvising and all that. And I think that three improvisers wouldn't have worked... Noel and Mitch, if anything, suffered in reputation 'cause they were so good at being that one sound, getting the effect that Hendrix was after and allowing him to be the spectacle, the front of it...
    Jimi didn't actually display himself as a working musician the way a lot of the musicians do... If you listen to his records they were really the heavier side of the black funk of that period. He was interested in getting those rhythm's right...I do remember that he would work with Mitch on the drum parts. As the composer of the pieces he would have an idea of what everybody would be doing, or at least what the basis would be. Like he wouldn't just compose his own bit. Having said that, once they got the feel then they [Mitch and Noel] were as free as the wind... If we got flack for playing incomprehensible music, or for not playing hits, Hendrix was always saying, "don't pressure them." He was very keen on people experimenting, I think he liked the fact that we were trying out unusual things more then the results...”

    “Someone might want to be Hendrix influenced, but to learn a brilliant guitar routine and then do it, that’s not Hendrix influenced. The Hendrix thing is the risk. It’s the pushing into unknown territory. Like Miles Davis said, ‘Play beyond what you know.”

    “He'd draw the curtains, get the candles out, and start playing heavy funk - and the room would turn into a whole other place in about an hour. If there was an aristocracy, he was just immediately handed the crown, even by the other aristocrats.”

    “It sounds sentimental, but he was a lovely man. Everybody can hear what a great musician he was, I don’t have to talk about that. But he was such a nice man: polite and encouraging. I wish more people were influenced by his behaviour offstage as on it.”

    Summing up Jimi Wyatt had just this to say: “Love”

    Kevin Ayers: “Because we were on tour together we were often at the same hotels. I mean, you know, normally you have the support groups hotel and then you have the star’s hotel. Right, the peeling ceiling, heh. Yes probably. But sometimes we stayed in the same hotel and-ehm, occasionally I-I saw Jimi Hendrix in the early in the morning before, ehm, he started to become Jimi Hendrix there an’ he was just, so’t’of, you know, real sweet little kid an’ really innocent, you know – once the groupies have gone - an’ very shy an’, you know heh, an’ then he would have to go through this whole process of various things to get to being that other, the one that was expected, yeah. But th-the difference was staggering between, you know, seeing the guy who wakes up in the morning a-and the guy who’s on stage, you know, burning his guitar and humping amps and stuff like tha’-playing brilliantly. So tha’-I mean that alone is a massive challenge for anybody, to have to keep repeating yourself. I think it was written into his contract [not. Ed.], after a while, that he had to go through those motions of, like, humping the guitar, ehm, setting fire to it, humping the amps and all that stuff. An’ he was really pissed with that. He said, ‘It’s, you know, something I do spontaneously and now I have to do it. And you could see it. I mean, I was a real fan so I-I used to watch him, the supporting act from the, from, an’ we used to see him. He used to grimace, really, say, ‘Oh no, I got to do this again,’ you know. An’, an’-and that’s the thing about ‘the business’, isn’t it, yeah? An’ it gets you, takes away things you do that are original, that are spontaneous that, ehm. Suddenly you’re obliged to do it and you have to get there every fucking night, you know.”
    “I became friendly with Jimi Hendrix himself. We used to go out to nightclubs together. I think that must have been something to do with me being basically a lyric writer in those days and he liked that. He was struggling to write and express all these things he felt and all the new experiences. Also I was a pretty blonde white boy. I think he went both ways actually. Any way possible, in fact, not just both!”

    “Sometimes I visited Jimi in the morning in his room, when we were staying at the same hotel and what struck me was that when he woke up he seemed to be very vulnerable and very shy and then would construct this character called Jimi Hendrix by a gradual application and intake of various substances. And girls and things around and stuff. One time when I went there he was besieged by guitar manufacturers. They would try to get him to endorse stuff by playing it, so they’d leave him these guitars which he’d promptly give away to his groupies.
    And you could see this almost inarticulate kind of very shy behaviour , touching his mouth and looking down and looking away. I was struck by the guy who got up on stage at night from the guy who woke up. It seemed a huge difference and it seemed like he was building this new person, filling this thing he’d developed. Everyone has that to a certain degree, especially in the performing arts where you’re not the same person on stage as you are when you’re at home with your family or friends, but I was quite shocked by the extremity of the change and what it took to get there.
    I think he was struggling very much because he was taking so many mind-expanding experiences, drugs as well as the other thing of playing in front of so many people and being adored, of having this incredible response and trying to live up to that. Needing to express his private feelings about the cosmos and man’s position to his fellow man – that sort of thing. I think he was very concerned about it and in his private moments he was a deep thinker. But then he was an odd sort of combination. He was an amazingly ostentatious, outgoing and energetic showman and at the same time he had this very moody, sensitive and often perceptive side.”

    Robert Wyatt: “[Jimi] was so cool and so shy. Spoke quietly. I mean he had his act but apart from his act you didn't feel like invading his privacy in the same room, at least I didn't. I can see people did and it was very embarrassing. Sort of an illusion that because you admire somebody they want to have you breathing down... When he wasn't working he was usually protected by sort of a praetorian guard of leggy women...obviously rather more interesting than some fucking drummer!”

    Kevin Ayers: “Our drummer, Robert Wyatt became very friendly with Mitch Mitchell. And with Noel Redding, for that matter.”

    Mitch: “As the tour progressed I got to know them, particularly Mike Ratledge, the keyboard player and Robert Wyatt, the drummer. Robert, in fact, put me on to people like Cecil Taylor who I wouldn't have heard otherwise.”

    Hugh Hopper: “We stayed in the same hotels, sometimes. There was no real separation...more times than not we [the roadies] were in the same hotel. But sometimes we had to stay en route somewhere else, like in a Holiday Inn, because it was easier for us to go on...
    Robert and Noel were quite matey...”

    Kevin Ayers: “What was great was, eh, for the first time in history you had a younger generation, ehm, fighting back and saying, you know, we don’t really want wars and bad food and we don’t want all that shit. There was a, kind of, feeling of unification, of people coming together, of that generation that I was talking about. Ehm, of people questioning, you know, their betters and all that, eh-eh, supposed betters. Ehn, saying, you know, why do we have to have this set of rules and the bands were the, kind of, glue. The bands like Soft Machine and Pink Floyd and... they were like the marching bands, you know, they provided the, ehm, the rhythm, the energy. It was just BIG for young English boys, or girls-heh, erm. And just made us examine our lives more and our life styles and, and our teachings. I mean yo’, talking about things like ‘Howl’ [Allen Ginsberg. Ed.], right? Yeah, I mean that’s an amazing piece of work, Ehm, no one had done that in England, so it was, ehm, stunning for us to get that, in the face, you know. HEY, you know.”

    “I remember it was great to be young and good looking and playing music. But that’s about all I remember.”

    ‘Have You Ever Bean Green’ (Robert Wyatt & Hugh Hopper)
    [from ‘Have You Ever Been Experienced’? ie they weren’t, they were ‘green’ – until this 1st US tour. Ed.]
    From the Soft Machine’s 1969 LP ‘Volume 2’
    Sung by Robert Wyatt:

    Thank you Noel and Mitch
    And thank you Jim
    For our exposure
    To the crowd
    and thank you
    for his coattails Mike
    you did us proud

    Didn’t you?

    01.
    Thursday 1 February 1968
    San Francisco, The Fillmore, 1805 Geary Boulevard, CA, USA.
    JHE flew in from NYC for a four night residency, moved after the 1st night to the much larger Winterland.
    Note: It was almost never and no one ever called it ‘Fillmore Auditorium’ apart from ‘officially’, like in contracts (as was Winterland), which is more of a description, really. The sign on the building, most advertising (a few posters have ‘auditorium’ in small text) and almost everything else was just ‘The Fillmore’.
    Fender amps
    Albert King: “[Bill Graham walked into the Manhattan Club (East St. Louis, Illinois) and offered me $1,600 to play three nights at the Fillmore]. I hadn’t made $1,600 for three days in my life. "He said, ‘How much deposit do you want?’ I said, ‘$500.’ I sent him a contract and he sent me a check for $1000. When I got there, I found out I was on the show with Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin.”
    Hugh Hopper: “At the beginning of the tour Fender actually provided, I think, something like three or four amps, which had to be used for both bands, which was not a good situation. And in fact Neville wasn’t told this till we were getting on the plane... It could have been disastrous. In fact it was fairly disastrous anyway, because it wasn’t the right gear for Hendrix. It was too clean and not enough orbit.”
    Neville: “On to Fillmore, set up gear while Gerry went back for group. They came 5:00 and tried new gear out and went back to hotel.”
    Two shows (40 minutes each)
    Show #1: The black leather ‘cowboy’ waistcoat; the black satin shirt; the choker, the ‘triangle’ & ‘chandelier’ necklaces; R. one ring; L. 2 rings; black silk trousers w’ the round chain-link belt & green/yellow neckerchief belt; white/rose strat w’ the cloth ‘0’s & X’s’ strap & a spare white strat; 2 fuzz faces linked.
    Show #2: The cowboy hat w’ the purple cloth & chain link bands; the ‘Afghan’ waistcoat; the ‘luck’ shirt; the choker, the ‘triangle’ & ‘chandelier’ necklaces; R. one ring; L. 2 rings; black silk trousers w’ the round chain-link belt & green/yellow neckerchief belt; white/rose strat w’ cloth ‘0’s & X’s’ strap & painted flying V w’ ‘floral roundels’ strap.
    Support: John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers; Albert King; Soft Machine with The Mark Boyle Sensual Laboratory light show. Noel’s book, from his diary has “The New Animals, Alan Price, Soft Machine”!
    Lights: Holy See
    Promoter: Bill Graham
    Photos: Grant Jacobs (1st show?) & Baron Wolman (2nd show?)
    Audience ~ 1,250 each show, but probably as many as Graham could get away with less than 2000.
    This appears to be about the size of the audience that saw them at the Tuscson V.I.P. Club
    Accomodation: Travel Lodge motel, ‘By The Bay’[?] at “Fisherman’s Wharf”. Jimi was photographed at the Travel Lodge motel by Baron Wolman of Rolling Stone.

    Songs 1st show:

    Red House
    Purple Haze
    Foxy Lady
    Fire
    The Wind Cries Mary
    and others unknown

    Songs 2nd show: unknown

    Neville: “1st went down a bomb.”

    Albert King: “The first time I saw him after he left Tennessee was in San Francisco. I hadn’t seen him in about five years, and he had this hot record out. So I went back in the dressing room and we laughed and talked and hugged one another. I was glad to see him. I think I shook him up a little bit because he didn’t expect me to be that close to him, playing-wise. Everybody said, ‘He’s a hell of a blues player.’ Now wait a minute! That night I taught him a lesson about the blues, playing your blues where they can understand it, instead of floor-showing. He had a row of buttons on the floor, and a big pile of amplifiers stacked on one another. And he’d punch a button with his foot and get some smoke. And punch a button and get something else.Then when he’d get through playing he’d take his guitar and ram it through his amplifier (laughs). Now, that record he put out, Foxy Lady, that wasn’t blues, but it was big. But when you want to really come down and play the blues, well, I could’ve very easily played his songs, but he couldn’t play mine.”

    “We started out at the old Fillmore but it was too small, so we had to move to Winterland.
    People had been waiting to hear me play for a long time before I even showed my face out there."

    “I was very surprised — and very glad. They made me welcome, treated me nice. Bill Graham opened up a young, white crowd for me by putting me in there.”

    Mick Taylor: “In John Mayall’s band I was lucky enough to do some shows on the same bill as Hendrix at the Fillmore West [sic] - Albert King was playing as well. Seeing Albert King for the first time was unbelievable - someone who had developed completely his own style, left-handed with the guitar strung upside-down. I can remember me and Jimi Hendrix standing together listening to Albert playing. Both of us were in awe of him.”

    New York Times (23 February) ‘The black Elvis’ - review by Michael Lyndon: “‘Will he burn it tonight?’ asked a neat blonde of her boyfriend, squashed in beside her on the packed floor of the Fillmore auditorium. “He did at Monterey, the boyfriend said, recalling the pop festival at which the guitarist, in a moment of elation, actually put a match to his guitar. The blonde and her boyfriend went on watching the stage crammed with huge silver-fronted Fender amps, a double drum set, and whispering stage hands. Mitch Mitchell the drummer came on first, sat down, smiled and adjusted his cymbals. Then came bassist Noel Redding, gold glasses glinting on his fair, delicate face, and plugged into his amp. ‘There he is,’ said the blonde, and yes, said the applause, there he was, Jimi Hendrix, a cigarette slouched in his mouth, dressed in tight black pants draped with a silver belt and a pale rainbow shirt half hidden by a black leather vest. ‘Dig this, baby’ he mumbles into the mike. His left hand swung high over his frizz-bouffant hair making a shadow on the exploding sun light show, then down onto his guitar and the Jimi Hendrix Experience roared into ‘Red House’. It was the first night of the group’s second American tour. During the first tour, last summer, they were almost unknown. But this time two LP’s and eight months of legend preceded them. The crowds in San Francisco - their three nights here were the biggest in the Fillmore’s history - were drooling for Hendrix in the flesh. They got it: this time he didn’t burn his guitar (‘I was feeling mild’) but, with the careless slovenly and blatantly erotic arrogance that is his trademark, he gave them what they wanted. He played all the favourites. ‘Purple Haze’, ‘Foxy Lady’, ‘Let Me Stand Next To Your Fire’ and ‘The Wind Cries Mary’. He played flicking his gleaming white Gibson between his legs and propelling it out of his groin with a nimble grind of the hips. Bending his head over the strings, he plucked them with his teeth as if eating them, occasionally pulling away to take deep breaths. Falling back and laying almost prone, he pumped the guitar neck as it stood high on his belly. He made sound by swinging the guitar before him and just tapping the body. He played with no hands at all, letting his wah-wah pedal bend and break the noise into madly distorted melodic lines. And all at top volume, the bass and drums building a wall of black noise heard as much by pressure on the eyeballs as with the ears.”
    Rolling Stone (1 (9) March) - interview by Jann Wenner [?] –
    Jimi: “Last night was the first time we played in so long. We’ve been doing new tracks that are really fantastic and we’ve just been getting into them and set our mind. We just got snatched while we were there. You just can’t do it if you really enjoy your music. It was like a scene: we were in the studio and we were really into some groovy things. Some really funky little things. And we were snatched out of the studio within a day of knowing nothing. There we were, thrown into the Paris scene, the Olympia Theatre, and we found ourselves waiting for two hours in the London Airport. Then we found ourselves in New York lost in the street. All these within hours of each other Then they had a press conference and here you are thinking about these songs. You have these songs in your mind. You want to hurry up and get back to the things you were doing in the studio, because that’s the way you gear your mind. And then we were thrown into the Fillmore: we wanted to play there, quite naturally, but you’re thinking about all these tracks, which is completely different from what you’re doing now It’s not exactly completely different, but it is more polished, more together, more, you know more us. Plus you play through strange amp’s... if people only knew what state of mind we’re in, like we’re half there or not; like I don’t even remember the Fillmore last night. I felt completely out of my mind.”

    ‘Al’ [a fantasist 2011, Wolfgang's Vault post] ‘Early Show’
    “I went to the Thursday show at the Fillmore and the lineup was different with the Soft Machine as the opening act followed by Albert King and then Jimi.
    When Albert ended the first set he was met with multiple standing ovations from a stunned audience of Jimi fans who were completely seduced by Albert's classic blues. Finally after several encores Albert begged the audience to let him leave the stage because he was "cuttting into Jimi's set and Jimi was in the wings of the stage getting pissed" [Bollocks. Ed.]
    Jim's set followed and after a couple of songs Jimi just walked off stage. After what seemed like a long time he came back with a Gibson Flying V like Albert was playing [pish, his guitar would have been standing next to his amp as usual and unlike King’s it was hand painted in beautiful psyche scrollery. It was not a ‘special treasure’ only to be brought out on special occasions. Ed.], and did about half of the set playing smoking hot blues on the Flying V [highly unlikely, he’s already said that JHE played at least two non blues at the start. He often played quite long versions of Red House, he may even have played ‘Hootchie Cootchie Man’ to let King know who was ‘boss’ as well, but anything more would be stretching it, ‘Catfish Blues’ at an outside stretch?. Ed.] before returning to his stratocaster and his Experience material for the remainder of the set, playing at times behind his back, between his legs, with his teeth [yeah, we all know that was part of his usual act. Ed.] and finally lighting the strat on fire: All reminiscent of his Monterey Pop performance the year before. [obvious bullshit, ie he’s seen the Monterey film and assumed Jimi often burned his guitar Ed.] It was like he needed to win the audience back by proving his blues roots [as if! Ha-ha-ha. Ed]. And he did!
    Jimi also received multiple standing ovations [bollocks’ does he know what a standing ovation is? The audience would have been standing from the start anyway, there may well have been some applause/response after a particular solo, or two, comments he made, whatever and ‘rock’ audiences frequently applaud a bit when their favourite songs are announced, or begun And if he had even played one encore it would have been a rarity. Ed.].
    ‘Late Show’
    After the intermission The Soft Machine did another improvisation for their second set and Albert King's band started to set up for their second set when Jimi walked onto the stage to talk with Albert. Albert took the microphone and announced that the bands were going to get together for a jam session for the rest of the evening. What transpired was PURE MAGIC as both epic performers traded licks in a monumental jam which included, as the night wore on, guest shots by other bay area musicians like Janis Joplin who were backstage or in the audience.” [obvious bullshit, not even hinted at by anyone else, and what happened to the Bluesbreakers Ed.]

    Thursday 1 February 1968 at latest. (Cover Mar/Apr)
    USA
    CRAWDADDY, (Back cover) full page advert of ‘Axis: Bold As Love’ sleeve art.

    Thursday 1 February 1968
    USA (Detroit, MI)
    FIFTH ESTATE (page?) ‘AXIS: BOLD AS LOVE, HENDRIX EXPERIENCE (Reprise)’: Jimi Hendrix Experience is without a doubt the finest trio in pop music. All three are brilliant in their expertise and they don't limit themselves to the usually tight confines of rock and roll harmony, progressions, and rhythms. Hendrix often overwhelms the listener with his piercing guitar runs spawned of charged emotion. His ability and unique style enables him to wade effortlessly through any type of material.
    Jimi Hendrix basically is a rhythm and blues guitarist, some of his heretofore unique guitar riffs are often beard flowing from the amplifiers of the Bobby Womacks and the Steve Croppers of Memphis, Tennessee.
    He has incorporated and absorbed everything that separated musicians like Mike Bloomfield, Jeff Beck, and Danny Kalb from the pack and integrated it with the abundant knowledge and skill he already possessed. The result is apparent, he is the best and he still has a long way to go.
    A couple of the cuts are weak but as a whole the album is better vocally and instrumentally than the first. 'Castles Made Of Sand,' 'If 6 Was 9’, 'One Rainy Wish,' and the flamboyant 'Bold As Love,’ seem to rise above the other tracks in the area of involvement and quality.

    Thursday 1 February 1968
    USA (Milwaukee, WI)
    KALEIDOSCOPE (page?) IT’S HAPPENING
    Tues. Feb.27
    THEATRE – Douglas Taylor’s “Oh, Pioneers,” Milw. Rep. Theatre, repeated Tues-Thurs. thru Mar. 22.
    ROCK-Jimi Hendrix – Madison’s Factory
    LECTURE – “The Negro in a time of revolt,” Nathan Hare, UWM, Bolton, 150.
    Wed. Feb. 28
    ASH WEDNESDAY- Cremate a friend!
    TRAVEL - "Satellite Countries & Yugoslavia," by Mrs. Lorin Tiefenthaler. Old Museum Lecture Hall, 7 :30 pm.
    ROCK-Jimi Hendrix Experience,
    The Scene, repeat 2/29

    Thursday 1 February 1968
    UK
    MELODY MAKER (page?) [B&W photo of Donovan] ‘Musica '68 set’
    THE line-up of names for Musica '68, the festival of jazz and popular music which is to take place in Majorca from July 22 to 27, grows larger.
    As set so far, the festival looks like this. Monday (22): The Byrds from America, Sweden's Hep Stars,the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the Animals, the Grapefruit and Los Pekenikes. Tuesday (23): Georgie Fame and, it is hoped, Francoise Hardy, Brook Benton and the Basic band.
    Wednesday (24); Electric String Band, Julie Felix, Donovan, Spanish singer Peret and, it is hoped, the Ofarim. Thursday (25): Bill Evans Trio, Maynard Ferguson, the Dutch Swing College with Beryl Bryden, Johnny Dankworth and Cleo Laine, Selina Jones, Blossom Dearie and perhaps the Charles Lloyd or Roland Kirk group.
    Friday (26): Marian Montgomery and the Laurie Holloway Trio, Gene Pitney, Gilbert Becaud and the Tages. Saturday (27); Sandie Shaw, Scott Walker and the Peddlers.
    (Page?) The Raver’s Weekly Tonic: ... Jimi Hendrix sat in with Sam Gopal’s Dream at the Speakeasy, and just about every other group in London according to their publicists. [...]
    (Page?) MAILBAG
    ROW
    THE latest Pet Clark v. Jimi Hendrix fan row in Mail-bag must be the most ludicrous ever. Of course Pet is entitled to an opinion, and so is Jimi!
    Both Pet and Jimi are great artists in their own right. If more time were spent by fans in listening and trying to understand all musical fields, there wouldn't be time for these irrelevant and useless comparisons. Anyway, I hate Des O'Connor.—MIKE BATES, Palmers Green, London. ● LP WINNER.
    I HAVE always been to the forefront of the Eric Clapton, Peter Green, Jimi Hendrix wrangles and I was pleasantly surprised to hear such a superb display of guitar work from Tom McGuiness of Manfred Mann on a Willie Dixon standard.
    He must be the most underrated guitarist in the country. "Mighty Quinn" is a good commercial record, but I would rather hear the drumming of Mike Hugg and the guitar of Tom McGuiness brought out on a jazz or blues number. — NIGEL SUMMERLEY, Kettering, Northants. ● LP WINNER




    Thursday 1 February 1968
    France
    LE MONDE (page 13) les variétés ‘Les Animals Au « Musicorama »’ Par Claude Sarraute:
    Variety ‘THE ANIMALS AT “MUSICORAMA”’ by Claude Sarraute:
    This the best of the genre, the psychedelic genre. The Animals were not long to follow in the steps of the Who and the Yardbirds, these pioneers of the “break out heart” 1, but to do so they had to change their line-up and corporate name.
    Very honourably known since 1962, the band broke up in 1966 and reunited some months later around its singer, a lard-fat, short legged boy who likes to reveal - between the belt of too tight pants and the hem of a too short shirt - some attractive bulges; young English girls would eat them, so they say: Eric Burdon is seen as the height of seduction across the Channel and thrills the crowds in the literal sense.
    Around him, leant against huge metallic amplifiers, real strong-boxes of sound, a drummer with a beautiful face of Christ on the Cross, two guitarists and an electric violin specialist, eyes lost under meringues of frizzy hippie hair, manage to cover the wild screams and strident whistles of the kids (average age fifteen) who cheer them. The noise is flowing back, constant and powerful backwash, from the audience to the stage, as the spotlights flicker, red and green lights, as the large whirling wings of the light beams pass over the hectic band, as orange spirals dear to Delaunay2 draw in the background, as incense clouds rise, colours, smells and sounds collide and meet. The tone increases, high and strong. Obviously brought by chemical means, hysteria crashes to the exact bearable limit. Here, paradoxically, violence claims to be in the service of non violence.
    Less futuristic, more relaxed, the show Jimmy Hendrix then offers, claims to the same style. He's a black American, English by adoption, which features under a Mexican felt hat, colourful silk pyjamas and embroidered sheepskin vest. With him, musique concrète and pop music almost meet, and his "experience" appears at times such as a popularization of certain attempts previously reserved only to the musical domain. This is not surprising. Soon spread, quickly lost, influence waves today encompass both vertically and horizontally the farthest points of the history of art and geography.

    1What does he mean? The original quote was in English, so not a mis-translation
    2 French avant-garde painter 1885-1941, co-founder of the Orphism art movement

    Thursday 1 [?] February 1968
    UK
    MUSIC MAKER (page?) [full page photo of Jimi holding guitar vertical] ‘Jimi Hendrix Interview’
    (Page?) [small B&W photo, ‘‘On my first gig I got 75 cents and three hamburgers.”] Jimi Hendrixthe music maker interview’[interview 9 Oct ‘67, in Jimi's room, "Hotel St. Petersbourg", Paris] by Mike Hennessey: A little more than a year after leaving the colourful bohemia of New York's Greenwich Village where, after backing such established artists as Little Richard, Otis Redding and B. B. King, he was trying to make a name as an artist in his own right, Jimi Hendrix has, at twenty-one, been voted the best pop musician in the world by Melody Maker Readers. In Paris, where Mike Hennessey obtained this interview, the Jimi Hendrix Experience were topping the bill at the Olympia Theatre—the place where the trio made its first public appearance almost exactly one year ago. With his "electrocuted porcupine" hairstyle, his way-out clothes, which seem to be made out of woven herbaceous borders, and his furry hoots, Jimi Hendrix looks a somewhat daunting prospect for an interview. "Who,” an ostentatiously English guest at Jimi's Paris hotel was heard to observe, "is that bloody savage?" But the slightly fearsome appearance is completely misleading.Jimiconducted this interview while lying naked in his hotel bed and despite a chronic lack of sleep— a scarcely avoidable hazard in Paris—he was disarmingly genial, relaxed and natural, and was utterly impervious to the barbs of impertinently provocative questions. From time to time he would just chuckle happily into his pillow when a question temporarily threw him, or amused him. It's a good test of anyone's equanimity to submit him to ninety minutes of probing questions when he is trying to catch up on sleep after a head-hammering night out. Jimi didn't even wince—neither during the interview nor at the end of it when the road manager came to get him out of bed for a photo call just when he was about to turn over for another couple of hours.
    ■ After a year in Britain, what is your opinion of the country?
    Britain is O.K.—but I wish we could play more places around the country. I miss playing in a lot of different places like we used to. But the problem is that we are doing more recording now and more tours abroad, so we don't get around England so much. We used to play different places every night of the week, but I guess it's not possible now.
    ■ How does the pop scene here compare with the scene in the States ?
    Oh, it's pretty much the same. In the States you've got the West Coast sound happening now—and there's the Motown sound and the Memphis sound. In England there seems to be a more earthy style emerging. I really like a lot of the English music that is happening now. The Eire Apparent, the Irish rhythm and blues group we worked at the Saville with—they're really good. And I liked the last record by the Marmalade.
    ■ Are you happier in England than you were in the States?
    Yeah—I'm much happier here because in the States I was always playing behind other people and I found it difficult to contain myself. It's O.K. at first, but then you get to a point where you can't stand any more. Of course it was great experience playing behind Joey Gee [sic, ‘Dee’], Little Richard, Chuck Jackson, Jackie Wilson, B. B. King, Otis Redding, the Isley Brothers and so on—but it's much better now I have my own group.
    ■ When did you first start playing guitar?
    Professionally when I was about fifteen or sixteen—I've been playing for about six years. My first gig was in Seattle, Washington, where I born. I got 75 cents and three hamburgers. Since then I've worked and lived all over the States.
    ■ Do you intend to return to the States?
    Not for the moment. I want to stay in England—and I understand there won't be any difficulty about getting work permits and so on as long as I'm a good little boy. I think I'd like to go back to the States eventually and buy a house in Hollywood.
    ■ Does the racial conflict in the States bother you ?
    I haven't had too much bother. I never paid too much attention to it. Seattle was an integrated city. I got pulled up by the police in Washington D.C. once and I was refused entry to one or two restaurants—but that was becaus I was with a couple of hippies. One of them looked a little like Sitting Bull. But it wasn't a racial thing.
    ■ Have you suffered from colour prejudice in Britain?
    Not really. I just don't get involved in it—as long as nobody doesn't bother me.
    ■ But how can you as a Negro fail to be involved in the racial problem?
    I don't even think about it.
    ■ Would you join a freedom march if you were asked?
    No, I don't think so. I'd really have to go into it very thoroughly before I took that much interest. I used to go on Sunday afternoons in Nashville to watch the fights downtown. But normally I just don't think along these lines. I have other more important things to do—like playing guitar. I'm not one of those political types.
    [small B&W photo, “Colour just doesn’t make any difference. Look at Elvis. . .”]
    ■ What do you think about the concept of Black Power?
    I don't think about it. Oh, there's a lot of silly talk on both sides. I'd have to get really involved in this before I could say anything.
    ■ But, as I said, aren't you automatically involved?
    I don't feel involved. I don't look at things in terms of races. I look at things in terms of people.
    ■ Some coloured musicians resent the fact that white people have had more money out of their music than they have. Do you?
    I haven't even thought about it.
    ■ But isn't it true that most white beat groups have derived their inspiration from coloured musicians and singers?
    I guess so—I've never thought about it.
    ■ You don't think that Negro culture has been exploited more for the benefit of white people than coloured people?
    Oh, man, people say things like that—but it's selfish and stupid. I always say let the best man win. If you can play the music—O.K. Whether you are black, white or purple. If somebody likes your music enough to be inspired by it, then that's fine. It's silly to say this kind of music can only be played by coloured people. Really, some people seem to think from their kneecaps. Colour just doesn't make any difference. Look at Elvis. He used to sing better when he sang the blues than when he started singing that beach party stuff. He could sing the blues—and he's white.
    ■ Who were your main influences?
    A lot of people—like Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly, Muddy Waters and different blues artists. I was largely influenced by blues artists when I first started.
    ■ How would you describe the kind of music you play now?
    I never think about it—until people start asking and trying to categorise it. Let's call it freak and funky music.
    ■ Your act was criticised in the States as being too erotic. What is your comment on this?
    Well, I suppose that came about because we were playing on the same bill as the Monkees and it was a bit of a contrast. We hadn't really played to that kind of kids' audience before and you have to realise that though the parents of the kids in England don't interfere too much, the parents in the States are something else. And then there are all those different kinds of stuffy organisations over there. We actually pulled out of that tour because there was a hassle. And we had a lot of other work coming up, including a tour of Scandinavia.
    ■ But is your act too erotic for kids?
    No. It's not really erotic. There's some sex in it I suppose and I might move around in certain ways and girls in the front seats might have funny expressions on their faces. But it's not downright sexy. My main thing is to put the words over. And I also like to entertain myself on the stage. I get tired of just standing up there. Our music isn't all that organised. We get on stage and start calling off tunes. We never have a set programme— we just play it by ear. So really anything can happen. But you've heard about American parents— and American people in general!
    [small B&W photo, “I'm really surprised by the success I've had”]
    ■ Do you think there is a more liberal moral climate in Britain?
    Definitely—and there's more understanding, too.
    ■ What do you think about being voted top musician in the MM pop poll?
    Oh, that's pretty groovy. It was very surprising, too, because I've only been playing in Britain a year. I'm really surprised by the success I've had. I still can't figure it all out yet—can't really understand it. But, of course, I'm glad. And I must say that Chas Chandler and Mike Jeffries helped a lot. When we first started playing there were a lot of question marks in people's faces and we didn't know whether they liked us or not. But it seems they did.
    ■ How did the famous Hendrix hairstyle develop?
    Well, I've always worn my hair pretty wild—it used to be longer than it is now. My dad used to cut it all the time when I was a kid and I used to go to school looking like a plucked chicken. Maybe that gave me a complex—so I had to start letting it grow. Now I just have the ends cut from time to time.
    ■ Did you have a happy home background as a kid ?
    Well, I stayed mostly at my aunt's and grandmother's. There were family troubles between my mother and father. My brother and I used to go to different homes because dad and mother used to break up all the time. Mostly my dad took care of me. He was a labourer, a gardener, and he'd once been an electrician. But we weren't too rich!
    ■ Do you still keep in touch with your family ?
    Yes. I still write home occasionally.
    ■ But you left home at sixteen.
    Yes. I joined the Army—and I was so bored. Army people tell you what to do all the time. I was in for fifteen months, then I broke my ankle and hurt my back in a parachute drop. That was about the best thing in the army—the parachute drops. I did about twenty-five. But the Army's really a bad scene. They wouldn't let me have any thing to do with music. They tell what you are interested in, and you don't have any choice. The Army is more for people who like to be told what to do.
    ■ After you came out of Army was it always your intention to get your own act together?
    Yeah. While I was backing those other artists I always had the idea that I would go on my own eventually. But it took me a little time get things together. Some things I do impetuously. But this I had to wait for.
    ■ You first started playing with your own group in the Village?
    Yes. And it was pretty tough at first. I was often in a situation where I didn't know where my next meal was coming from. People would say, "If you don't get a job you'll just starve to death." But I didn't want to take a job outside music. I tried a few jobs, including car delivery, but I always quit after a week or so. I'd worry a bit about not having any money—but not enough to go out and rob a bank. Then when Chas Chandler came over I decided I'd give England a try—I’d never been there before. Record companies had started to show a little interest in me when I was playing at the Café a Gogo. A year before Mick Jagger had tried to get me on a tour. But I wasn't really ready then [ie in Nov 1965. Ed.].
    ■ What sort of things bug you in the music business?
    I guess there are lots of little things that bug you. But I can't think of anything in particular.
    ■ You're a pretty happy guy, then?
    I guess so.
    ■ Do you ever lose your temper?
    Well, sometimes when you're resting after working for eighteen hours in a day and trying to have a quiet meal somewhere, you get annoyed when kids come in and bug you for autographs and pictures. I think this shows a complete lack of consideration. You get no kind of private, personal life in this business. Look at what they did to the Stones. People working in offices can get a private life, but not us.
    [small B&W photo, “You get no kind of private life in this business”]
    ■ Do you have a lot of girl friends?
    I used to have millions in the States. They kept me from starving when I was in the Village a year and a half ago. I didn't have a thing—no money, no job. I even had my guitar stolen. But those girls helped me. One of them even bought a guitar for me.
    ■ Can't girls also be a problem ?
    Yeah. Sometimes it's a problem to be nice to all of them. If they invite you to their place and you say no thanks then they think you are big-timing them. And half of them ask you such silly questions. Like when was the last time you saw John Lennon, and can you get the Box Tops' autographs. There's also a big challenge thing with some girls. They'll say, boasting, "Oh, I've been with him before," to their friends. And they'll say, "I wonder what it's like to sleep with John Walker?" There are always some who want to sleep with you. But there are others who you can actually talk to.
    ■ Do you have a steady girl friend?
    No. I used to. But I can't get along with just one girl. I don't like to be tied down too much.
    ■ Have you run much into the belief that coloured men are more virile than whites?
    Yeah, I've heard that. But there's nothing to it. It's got nothing to do with colour. It's just another stupid generalisation. Like they say Swedish girls have got no sense of humour. But in Stockholm I met some that had a great sense of humour.
    ■ Pop groups generally have greater privileges and opportunities when it comes to sex, but do you think they should set a moral example?
    I think pop groups have a right to their own private life—as I said before. People should judge them by what they do on stage—as singers and musicians. Their private life is their own business and people shouldn't know too much about that. You can't expect artists to be goody-goodies all the time. In any case kids aren't as dumb and easily influenced as some people think. They have a lot of common sense. Any kid that does something bad because a certain pop idol did it would probably have done it anyway.
    ■ Does marriage figure in your immediate plans?
    No. I've no intention of getting married. I really couldn't imagine it.
    [small B&W photo, “It's wrong to classify all drugs under one heading.”]
    ■ Are you religious?
    I used to believe in different things as a little boy. I believed that if you put a tooth under your pillow a fairy would come in the night and take the tooth and leave a dime. But as for now—well there are so many different beliefs going round. I believe there must be some kind of God—but there are so many different religions. I believe that human beings somehow just happened. So many things are unexplained. I don't really talk about religion. I was sent to church when I was a kid—and one time somebody got excited and hit me in the eye with their elbow. I guess that turned me off church. I suppose human beings have to believe in something—they feel they have to be directed in some way, have to have something to follow, regardless of whether it's true or not.
    ■ So what do you believe in?
    I believe in myself more than anything. And I suppose, in a way, that's also believing in God. If there is a God and He made you, then if you believe in yourself, you're also believing in Him. I think everybody should believe in himself. I don't believe in heaven and hell and all that stuff—but I suppose there must be something in religion.
    ■ For an increasing number of people, pot seems to have become a substitute for religion. What are your views on marijuana?
    I think smoking pot will probably be legalised in five or ten years. I don't, on the other hand, think drink is a good thing. They should carry out a big inquiry into the effects of pot just to see how harmful it really is. It seems to me to be silly to be sent to jail for smoking a natural
    plant. You've got winos and drunkards out in the streets begging for money and nobody seems to care about this. Yet some people will kill for a few cents to buy a drink. I think the situation will get itself together soon. This is just the beginning of the cold war between those who want pot and those who don't. One thing I am sure of—it's wrong to classify all drugs under one heading. Pot is completely different from hard drugs. I really don't see how anyone can put a needle in themselves. I had pneumonia when I was young and I used to scream and cry every time they put that needle in me.
    ■ Is there anything you regret in your life?
    Only that I didn't start singing and playing on my own much earlier. I also regret that I'm lazy—I used to write thousands of tunes, but I don't seem to get around to it now.
    ■ What are your plans for the future?
    First of all I'd like to see a lot more festivals in Britain. I'd really like to get a Monterey scene going. I'm also trying to work out a whole new concept of putting on a show— something more in the form of a play with good stage presentation, a completely different approach. But it will be some time before we get into it. I'll also be experimenting with different instrumentation. We'll keep the basic trio but add other musicians temporarily when we want a different sound. And finally, I'm looking forward to our six-week tour of the States which starts next February. But most of all right now I'm looking forward to going back to sleep.
    (But, unfortunately, he never made it!) ■
    (Page?) [title?] I'M a guitarist and I am trying to play like Jimi Hendrix, but there is always something wrong with the sound. Could it be his guitar or his fuzz-box that makes the difference? Please ask him to help me.— FERIT ERGIN, ANKARA. TURKEY.
    JIMI HENDRIX replies: I've got about eight guitars, but the two I use most are a Fender Stratocaster and a Gibson Flying Angel which is shaped like a letter A, and is extremely rare in Britain. The only other one I know about is owned by Dave Davies, of the Kinks. On stage I use two Marshall and two Sound City 100-watt amplifiers and I find that this combinanation provides the sound I require coupled with reliability. Each amplifier has four 4 inch x 12 inch cabinets. But the secret of my sound is largely the electronic genius of our tame boffin, who is known to us as Roger the Valve! He has rewired my guitars in a special way to produce an individual sound and he has made me a fantastic fuzz-tone, which you can hear to good effect on our new LP. "Axis, Bold As Love". Actually, it's more of a sustain than a fuzz. He got a special sound out of the guitar on "One Rainy Wish" and "Little Miss Lover". It comes through a whole octave higher (doubles the frequency of the guitar) so that when playing high notes it sometimes sounds like a whistle or a flute. Whatever incredible sounds we think up, he manages to create them, but I want to emphasise that we seek only to get a variation of sound, not gimmicks.
    (Page?) [large B&W Polydor pop art split-ad, looks like alien hands] [R.] Jimi Hendrix ‘Axis: Bold As Love[Track logo] [L.] Cream ‘Disraeli Gears’ [Immediate logo]

    Thursday 1 February 1968
    USA
    NEW YORK POST (page?) [B&W photo, ‘British pop stars (l-r) Ernie Grahame of Eire Apparent, Mitch Mitchell ofJimi Hendrix Experience, John Weider of Animals and Kevin Ayers of Soft Machine take U.S. in stride. They're here on tour. Post photo by Gummere]
    ‘British Rock Stars Clatter In To Town’ By Alfred G. Aronowitz: When the press conference was over,Jimi Hendrix sat behind a scotch and coke in the Copter Club on the top floor of the Pan Am building and talked about a girl friend in Buffalo who once sent him to the hospital with a stomach attack.
    "She really worked the roots [herbs] on me,” he said. “I mean she was into some kind of
    voodoo.”
    Jimi Hendrix had to go to England to become a pop star. When he tried to play Harlem's Apollo Theater a few years ago, the people took one look at his uncombed, frizzly hair and started mumbling things like, "Who does he think he is, a Black Jesus or something?"
    They Stand and Wait
    Last night, he arrived for an American tour with a troupe of 32, representing four English rock groups, and found several dozen reporters, magazine writers, radio interviewers and that CBS camera crew, waiting for him.
    Auother camera crew from ABC television would have been there to, but the press conference started more than an hour and half late.
    "Sometimes," Jimi Hendrix said, “the audience says ‘Hooray’ so loud it scares me out of my mind. I want to say, 'Not so loud.’ But I like it. It makes me feel like crying."
    Through the rain-dropped window, 58 stories below, he could see Park Av. pointing its tracer bullets at 96th. St. He left his home town of Seattle seven years ago and hasn't seen his fattier since.
    At 23, he can probably play the electric guitar better than anyone else in the pop-world. He can play it with his toes, his teeth, his nose and his elbows.
    "My father never heard me play," he said. "When I left home, I still hadn't gotten it together. I didn't start on the guitar till I was 16, 17. Kids today start to learn to play it when they're 4." The press conference was scheduled for 6:15 p.m. but the plane from London arrived 15 minutes late and helicopter flights from Kennedy Airport to the Pan Am heliport had been grounded by poor visibility all day. By the time the groups arrived by limousine, the canapes had run out and the photographers were taking pictures of themselves.
    A Missing Animal
    There was the Eire Apparent, a brand-new Irish group. There was the Soft Machine, which claims to create bridges between musical idioms.
    There was the Sensual Laboratory, a team of light show specialists who had just won the biennial award of the Arts Council of France.
    There was Eric Burdon and the Animals, minus Eric Burdon, who had missed the plane in London when customs officials demanded an additional duty payment on his America car.
    But the obvious star was Jimi Hendrix, who strode in wearing a green flowered jacket, a black hat with a purple band and checked madras pants.
    When his trio, the Jimi Hendrix Experience, released the first album last year, it rose to No. 6 on the pop charts.
    “Let’s start with LSD," a TV interviewer, asked him.
    "What do you want me to say?” answered Hendrix.
    "Should we legalize pot?" the TV interviewer asked.
    "Well, there are a lot of pot smokers and a lot of people will get busted if you don't." Hendrix answered.
    A Small Disturbance
    ■ The press conference broke up when a member of a television camera punched an advertising executive in the nose for getting in his way. With blood streaming down his face, the advertising executive got up on chair and called out, “If anybody saw me get hit will you please step forward and give me your name?"
    ■ When it was over, Jimi Hendrix sipped his scotch and coke and talked about going to a New York restaurant to get some soul food.
    “I can’t remember the last time I combed my hair," he said. "But see, it's not the long hairs that start trouble, it's the short hairs."

    Thursday 1 February 1968
    UK
    RECORD MIRROR (page?) TOP L.P.’s
    01. SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND Beatles (Parlophone)
    02. SOUND OF MUSIC Soundtrack (RCA)
    03. VAL DOONICAN ROCKS BUT GENTLY Val Doonlcan (Pye)
    04. GREATEST HITS Four Tops (Tamla Motown)
    05. BRITISH MOTOWN CHART BUSTERS Various Artistes (Tamla Motown)
    06. PISCES, AQUARIUS, CAPRICORN & JONES LTD. The Monkees (RCA Victor)
    07. REACH OUT Four Tops (Tamla Motown)
    08 THIRTEEN SMASH HITS Tom Jones (Decca)
    09. GREATEST HITS Supremes (Tamla Motown)
    10. THEIR SATANIC MAJESTIES' REQUESTS Rolling Stones (Decca)
    11. LAST WALTZ Engelbert Humperdinck (Decca)
    I2. AXIS-BOLD AS LOVE Jimi Hendrix Experience (Track)
    13. BREAKTHROUGH Various Artistes
    14. DISRAELI GEARS Cream (Reaction)
    15. WHO SELL OUT The Who (Track)
    16. MR. FANTASY Traffic (Island)
    17. BEST OF THE BEACH BOYS VOL. 2 Beach Boys (Capitol)
    18. OTIS BLUE Otis Redding (Atlantic)
    19. TOM JONES LIVE AT THE TALK OF THE TOWN Tom Jones (Decca)
    20. DOCTOR ZHIVAGO Soundtrack (MGM)

    Thursday 1 February 1968
    USA
    VILLAGE VOICE (page?) [B&W text ad]
    REAL ROCK
    rock music / interviews / pop news / reports
    105.9 FM
    EVERY SATURDAY MIDNIGHT to 5am
    The Biggest Playlist in the Country
    This Week : JIMI HENDRIX & MIKE BLOOMFIELD – on tape
    PAUL WILLIAMS, editor of Crawdaddy live

    Thursday 1 February 1968
    Canada (MB)
    WINNIPEG FREE PRESS (page 56) [B&W sale ad. 20 Lp’s 9 pictured, inc. AYE. Only other ‘rock’ album is Paul Butterfield] EATON’S. Save, Popular LP Records $3.69
    “JIMI HENDRIX has a real ‘Experience’.”

    [Day?] February 1968
    USA
    ARGO (page?) [B&W ad]
    Kappa Sigma in conjunction with Barry Lawrence presents in a pillow concert
    The JIMI HENDRIX EXPERIENCE
    plus the SOFT MACHINE and the EAST SIDE KIDS
    lights by the soft machine
    Feb. 11 Robertson Gym
    Students $2,50 Public $3.00
    Tickets on sale at Benwitts, UCen, Car/Stereo and the Record Rack.

    [Day?] February 1968
    UK
    BEAT INSTRUMENTAL (page ?) ‘1967 Gold Star Awards’: Recording Vocalist: 10. Eric Burdon, 11. Donovan, 12. Jimi Hendrix; Lead Guitarist: 1. Clapton, 2. Jimi Hendrix; 3. Hank Marvin, Bass Guitarist: 1. Jack Bruce, 2. Noel Redding, 3. Paul McCartney; Drummer: 1. Ginger Baker, . Keith Moon, 3. George Bennet, 4. Mitch Mitchell;[B&W photo, ‘Jimi Hendrix Experience’] Best Group On Stage: 1. Jimi Hendrix Experience; 2. Who; 3. Cream. Recording Manager: 6. Chas Chandler; 7. Kit Lambert. Song Writing Team: 1. Lennon/McCartney; 2. Shadows; 3. Jimi Hendrix.

    [Day?] February 1968
    USA (Los Angeles, UCLA)
    DAILY BRUIN [?] (page?) [B&W text ad]
    The Jimi Hendrix Experience
    England’s Underground Sensation
    The Soft Machine
    with The Mark Boyle Sense Laboratory
    Tuesday, February 13, 1968
    AU Grand Ballroom 8:00 P.M.
    Tickets $2.00 At KH Ticket Office

    [Day?] February 1968
    Nederlands
    MUZEIK PARADE (page?) [large B&W photo of Jimi in Ringo flat & ¾ page blw up of stage profile]Jimi Hendrix: I Am Often Treated Very Rudely’:
    Mr. Jimi Hendrix is doing just fine! Not long ago he was playing for very little money in all kinds of beat clubs.
    Fortunately he was discovered and currently he is one of the best paid teen stars. Jimi is not at home much. A little tour here, a little tour there. Anyway, a normal job for a pop star. Yet it’s a shame that Jimi is more away than at home. He has a beautiful home, magnificent -furniture (in French style), two telephones, a television set, and a collection of daggers [note the militaria collection was Chas’. Burdon & Jeffery also collected militaria. Ed]. “Nice couch, right? I just love that stuff. It has to have a lot of gold in it. You can see this from the coats I wear now and then. Those are riddled with gold thread. To tell the truth it's a waste to furnish a house of a pop star nicely. You’re never there and when you are at home and you want to relax, there's always somebody dropping by. To do an interview or something...
    Anyway, I don't care so much.
    I like this life much better than the life of a poor musician who has to play all night for a few bucks. They say I ask a lot of money for my shows. That's bullshit. I look at it from a business point of view. When I play the whole theatre is packed and the promoters let the people who come to see me pay a good price. Why do only the promoters have to benefit...?
    I am the guy who the kids come to see.
    A pop star lives for a short time...
    Okay, then they have to pay me good as well. It may sound crude, but the life of a pop star is short. I mean, in two or three years they might not even know who Jimi Hendrix is. Okay, that's not bad, but Jimi has to eat and drink too and wants to enjoy things after three years from now. Well, if you want this, you have to take care that when you are still famous you have to earn as much money as possible. That's only normal. On the other hand you spend a lot of money. I don't have many days off, but when I do I enjoy myself as much as I can. My style of guitar playing is copied a lot these days. Yes, I know this. It makes me very happy. It's just great to know that many people all over the world look at you and then exactly
    copy what you did. I hate bands that go on stage and not give it all. Those cats that only play for the money. When they are still unknown they go all the way, but after two hit records they take it for granted and they show up as the big boys. Fortunately people take notice of these groups more and more. I think that's just great. That people become critical. They don't swallow all the big guys do. Nowadays you will have to work damn hard to stay at the top. Also, I can't stand that people don't look at you or treat you very rude, just because you don't
    happen to have a parting in the middle of your hair and wear a neat ready-made suit. I mean what does it matter what you wear and how you wear your hair? Those people who are dressed in stiff suits and who do their best not to stand out are often terrible bastards. So it has nothing to do with how you are dressed. Man. you should see how they treat me in restaurants. I really have to do my best not to get hold of those guys. Anyway, you get used to it.
    I can be very difficult
    In TV studios I can be very difficult, I know. That's just because I don't want to play-back. TV directors are only interested in the nice shot they want to capture. But I don't care about that. I'm only interested in the music. That's the most important thing for me. Let them play my
    record instead and have a few beautiful girls dance to it. Then they have their nice shot.
    Plans for the future? Well, I don't care much about that. It's the same as with my shows: I see it when I get there. I never make plans ahead. It has to be spontaneous. I do want to make a lot of money for later on, but I already said that. For the rest... To make music for as long as possible.
    (Pages?) [very large B&W, ink pen, psyche, fold-out poster] Jimi Hendrix Experience [psyche text]

    [Day?] February 1968
    Switzerland
    POP (page?) [B&W ad, photos of groups & text] POP MONSTERKONZERT
    30 And 31 May
    Hallenstadion Zurich.
    The Jimi Hendrix Experience
    Eric Burdon And The New Animals
    The Traffic The Cream
    The Koobas Anselmo Trend
    During his last stay in England H. R. Jaggi also took the opportunity to orient Eric Burdon and Jimi Hendrix on the exact course of the concert. He met the two at midnight in London Celebrity Club "Speakeasy." ► [B&W photo of Jimi, Burdon & Jaggi]

    [Day?] February 1968
    Switzerland
    POPFOTO (page?) [two page B&W photo, TOTPs 1966, ‘Jimi Hendrix Experience’.]

    [Day?] February 1968
    UK
    RAVE (page?) The Informer:
    ■ Chas Chandler on the list as a footballer
    ■ Viv Stanshall of the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band married on New Year’s Day
    ■ Why does Scott Walker want a plastic elbow?
    ■ Why was a large white horse parked outside Kit Lambert’s flat over Christmas and where was the rider to be—Jimi Hendrix?
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    ■ Is the "love song" disappearing from the pop scene? You know the one I mean—"moon — June — romance—dance". Well one man who believes it is and has good reason for saying so is Rolling Stone Brian Jones.
    "People want songs that say something important now," says Brian. "Look at the compositions of Traffic, the Kinks, Hendrix, the Beatles and the Who. They all comment or say something important."
    (Page?) [B&W photo of group] ■ Ex-Animal Chas Chandler, the man who discovered Jimi Hendrix, has a new group under his wing that he hopes are destined for as much fame in '68 as Jimi. They're called the Eire Apparent, a young Irish group with a new record out called "Follow Me", released on Track Records and written by two of the Flowerpot Men. Dave, Chris, Ernie and Henry, as the Eire Apparent like to be known, were a top group in Ireland.

    [Day?] February 1968
    UK
    UNIT (cover) [full page 3 colour silk screen print of Jimi’s face with psyche vibations around it]
    (Page?) [B&W Monterey, ‘(photo: Ray Stevenson.) Interview edited from conversation with
    Steve Barker.’] [interview 8 November, Manchester University Students’ Union]
    ‘JIMI HENDRIX’ [in psyche text] by Steve Barker:
    —The blurb on your first LP says you are trying to create, create, create. Are you satisfied with what you are creating?
    'We like to have our own sound, but we're not satisfied, not yet. You might be pleased with what you're doing once in a while, but never really satisfied. We're pleased with the LP we've just finished for instance. But the ideas we got out of it could go on to our next one.'
    —How does the Experience get such fusion when you are basically a blues-man, Noel a rock man and Mitch a jazzman?
    'I don't know! Actually this is more like a free-style thing. We know what song we're going to play and what key it's in, and the chord sequence and we just take it from there'
    —How far can you go with the music you're playing now?
    'I don't know. You can go on until you bore yourself to death I guess. You got to try something else. I think I'll start all over again and come back as a king bee.'
    —You write all your own material, where does it come from?
    'Just from me. We go to clubs a lot and go all around in taxis and you happen to see a lot of things. You see everything, experience everything as you live. Even if you're living in a little room, you see a lot of things if you have imagination. The songs just come.'
    -Loneliness is such a drag?
    'That's what it is really sometimes. That was the song I liked best of all we did. I'm glad it didn't get big and get thrown around.'
    —Does this mean you're an introvert?
    'Well, sometimes. Right then when I wrote 'Midnight Lamp' I was. I was feeling kind of down like that. But really I have to catch myself and find out. So you go into different moods and when you write your mood comes through. So you can go back and listen to your records and know how you were feeling then and how your moods change at different times.
    —But loneliness is such a drag is a whispery quiet thing. How come you put these words in among powerful extrovert stuff?
    'I like to play loud. I always did like to play loud. The worlds of the song just come. I don't know how it comes about, it starts off quiet until we get into it.'
    —How much do you owe to a blues background?
    'Not necessarily anything! I went south and just listened to the way the people played blues guitar and I dug it. But then I like a lot of other things too. That's why we try to do our own stuff, make something new.'
    —There's a lot of controversy over the responsibilities of pop stars. Do you you yourself feel any?
    'That's silly. Whatever a cat does in his private life should be his own business. Everybody knows this, but you can say it a million times and it still won't get through to some people. I don't really feel responsible too much to myself. Maybe that's all.'
    —Do you ever feel like going away and sorting yourself out like maybe Dylan did?
    'I think that's going to have to happen soon anyway because everyone's getting so tired and you work so hard sometimes and it gets to be really frustrating.’
    —How come you got caught up in the hippy scene.
    'It just happened to come about that we were around at the time of pschedelia and all the in-clothes. I dug that scene, but not necessarily what you call the hippy scene, because I don't like classification anyway. Regardless of the scene, we just happened to be playing freak-out and psychedelic things, but it does bother us because psychedelia only means mind expansion anyway. I can't hear a single word the Pink Floyd are saying. There's so many other types of music. We just happened to be in that groove, that bag right then.'
    —Do you try to communicate by words or sound when you're on stage or both? Because the words never usually come out.
    'Most of the songs we're doing now, people know the words, I think, but it probably doesn't mean much to them. They just want somebody to break their neck on stage.'
    — Does that mean that you write primarily for yourself?
    'Oh definitely. One song we did called 'I don't live today' was dedicated to the American Indian and all minority depression groups. All I did was just use a few words and they said 'what does that mean. That doesn't mean anything', because there was only three or four lines in there anyway.'
    — How about Donovan and his little scene?
    ‘He’s nice, kinda sweet! He's a nice little cat in his own groove, all about flowers and people wearing golden underwear. I like Donovan as a person, but nobody is going to listen to this 'love' bit. I like Dylan's music better because it’s more earthy and live. 'Mellow Yellow' is slang in the States for really groovy, ‘Sunshine Superman' means that he can get his girl. Anyway that's my interpretation. I'd like to play some sessions with Dylan, his group ought to be more creative. These days people think that everyone else ought to have trips and everyone is singing about trips.'
    — How about straight piss taking like the Mothers?
    ‘I like to listen to them, but we do our own thing. You know we had a chance to go into that bag because everybody's mind is still open. But we decided that we didn't want to go that way completely towards strict freakout.’
    — Are there any pressures on you as to what material you record?
    ‘No none at all. We're just writing and playing what we want. But our moods change, like once we wanted to do a Dylan song as one of our singles. Then we wanted this and that, but we always wind up doing our own regardless whether they flop or not. At least we're doing our own thing. If you do someone else's song every fifth single, it shows something is missing. But you just don't throw anything out on record. I like to be involved and I like music. The same old story. All that goody goody stuff. Music is a love to me. The money's great too.'
    — What level are you aiming for when you make a record, the kids?
    ‘No not necessarily. We quite naturally want people to like it. That's the reason for putting the record out. You see I have no taste. I couldn't say what's a good record and what's a bad one really. I don't have no feelings about commercial records. I don't know what a commercial record really is. So what we do is write and try to get it together as best as possible for anybody who'd really dig it. It doesn't make any difference who.'
    — How big a part do visuals take in your stage act?
    'I get a kick out of playing. It's the best part of the whole thing. You just do it when you feel like it sometimes. I used to feel like it. But not anymore man, you would have a heart attack if you were doing it every night like we were doing three or four months ago. We'd be dead by this time. You can't do it right unless you feel it. Half of the things I do I don't even know it because I just felt like it at the time. If you have everything planned out and one little thing goes wrong you think 'Oh, what am I supposed to be doing now. Oh yeah, I'm supposed to be going like this ... Hi everybody, I'm doing it'.'
    At this point a young lady from the 'Manchester Independent' asked Mr. Hendrix as to whether there was anything he wanted materially. This question was slightly distorted by an outburst of primitive laughter from the male section of the gathered assembly. She asked if there was anything left.
    'There's a whole lot of things left. Thousands of them. I see them downtown everyday. Millions of them! Marvellous!'
    — What about the Beatles and the things they're doing now?
    'I think it's good. The're one group you really can't put down because they're just too much and it's so embarrassing, man, when America is sending over the Monkees. I am so embarrassed that American could be so stupid as to make somebody like that. They could have at least done it with a group that has something to offer. The've got groups in the States that are starving to death, trying to get breaks and then these fairies come up.'
    —Do you ever think of going back to the States?
    'I think about it every single day. I really miss it. Like the west coast. Nothing has to happen to me. I just like to be out there. I like the weather, the scenery and some of the people. You can have a chocolate milkshake in a drug store, chewing gum at a gas station and soup from little machines on the road. It's great, it's beautiful. It's all screwed up and nasty and prejudiced. And it has everything.'
    (Page?) [B&W photo, ‘John Peel’] ‘RELAXED HENDRIX’
    'Then of course, Hendrix has some superb ideas. It is interesting really because Hendrix is more relaxed now. The first LP was incredibly exciting but at the same time a bit frightening too, because there was a sort of anger and violence in it. I must admit though, that Hendrix, on stae is a drag. I don't like all this erotic crap because I don't think it's necessary. You can play the guitar a hell of a lot if you're not pretending to be stuffing it. I just think that he is enough of a musician to be able to stand up without doing it.'
    'Donovan is getting so good now. I don't know what he is like as a person, and I think this is important, but I think his songs are just exactly right.

    [Day?] February 1968
    Sweden
    VI-UNGE (page?) [group colour photo]Jimi Hendrix Experience’: The Jimi Hendrix Experiencewas truly something of an experience when the group visited this country for the first time last year. Since then there has been several efforts to bring Jimiand his band here for a return visit, but each effort has come to nothing for various reasons. Forum in Copenhagen would happily have invitedJimi as one of the main attractions of this autumn's Teen '67 exhibition, but decided not to on second thoughts. !t was feared that many of the fans wanting to come see Jimi play would be denied entry, as the fire laws are strict on how many people are to be admitted to the big hall. And there were enough exhibits as it were, perhaps particularly on that day.
    But on January 7th, the concert went ahead at Tivolis Koncertsal, and it was proven once more thatJimi Hendrix - like Cream - is one of the new really exciting pop acts. The tickets sold out in record time.

    [Day?] February? 1968
    UK?
    [UNKNOWN paper] (page?) [large B&W photo of Jimi looking rather ‘smoothe’] ‘Jimi Hendrix, trend-setter extraordinaire’ by [unknown]: "The mini skirt was quite naturally the best thing that happened in 1967—and I could really dig seeing them and more lace blouses in 1968! And American Indian style gear with balloon sleeves and very soft material for contrast. What would be great too would be more short Roman robes— you know, something like Helen of Troy only shorter. As for me, in 1968 I'll be wearing a coffin if I don't take care of myself. If not that, I will be in a lot of Spanish gear, I really love it. I send my love to the short-robe wearers of 1967."

    [Date?] February [?] 1968
    USA (Phoenix, AZ)
    [UNKNOWN] (page?) [B&W psyche pic ad] Monday Feb. 5th *** Admission $3.00
    [negative image] THE JIMI HENDRIX EXPERIENCE With The Soft Machine, Live At Live, Sun Devil’s Gym, ASU, Tempe, 8 O’clock
    Presented By Sigma Chi Fraternity
    Ticket Outlets: Bob’s Records - Central & Camelback, Murray’s Stereo - Phoenix, Serendopity- Scottsdale, Melody Shop - Tempe, ASU Campus from only Sigma Chi

    [Date?] February [?] 1968
    USA (Los Angeles, CA)
    [UNKNOWN] (page?) [B&W text ad] The Jimi Hendrix Experience
    England’s Underground Sensation
    The Soft Machine
    with the Mark Boyle Sense Laboratory
    Tuesday, February 13, 1968
    A.U. Grand Ballroom 8: P.M.
    Tickets $2.00 at KH Ticket Office

    [Date?] February [?] 1968
    USA (Denver, CO)
    [UNKNOWN] (page?) [B&W text ad] See The
    Jimi Hendrix [Love hearts with arrow pic.]
    Experience
    Valentine’s Day
    Wednesday 14 February 1968
    Admission $3.00 8:30 – 11:00 P.M.
    Denver’s only appearance
    Tickets Available

    Thursday 1 February 1968
    UK
    MELODY MAKER (page?) [B&W photo of Donovan] ‘Musica '68 set’
    THE line-up of names for Musica '68, the festival of jazz and popular music which is to take place in Majorca from July 22 to 27, grows larger.
    As set so far, the festival looks like this. Monday (22): The Byrds from America, Sweden's Hep Stars, the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the Animals, the Grapefruit and Los Pekenikes. Tuesday (23): Georgie Fame and, it is hoped, Francoise Hardy, Brook Benton and the Basic band.
    Wednesday (24); Electric String Band, Julie Felix, Donovan, Spanish singer Peret and, it is hoped, the Ofarim. Thursday (25): Bill Evans Trio, Maynard Ferguson, the Dutch Swing College with Beryl Bryden, Johnny Dankworth and Cleo Laine, Selina Jones, Blossom Dearie and perhaps the Charles Lloyd or Roland Kirk group.
    Friday (26): Marian Montgomery and the Laurie Holloway Trio, Gene Pitney, Gilbert Becaud and the Tages. Saturday (27); Sandie Shaw, Scott Walker and the Peddlers.
    (Page?) The Raver’s Weekly Tonic: ... Jimi Hendrix sat in with Sam Gopal’s Dream at the Speakeasy, and just about every other group in London according to their publicists. [...]
    (Page?) MAILBAG
    ROW
    THE latest Pet Clark v. Jimi Hendrix fan row in Mail-bag must be the most ludicrous ever. Of course Pet is entitled to an opinion, and so is Jimi!
    Both Pet and Jimi are great artists in their own right. If more time were spent by fans in listening and trying to understand all musical fields, there wouldn't be time for these irrelevant and useless comparisons. Anyway, I hate Des O'Connor.—MIKE BATES, Palmers Green, London. ● LP WINNER.
    I HAVE always been to the forefront of the Eric Clapton, Peter Green, Jimi Hendrix wrangles and I was pleasantly surprised to hear such a superb display of guitar work from Tom McGuiness of Manfred Mann on a Willie Dixon standard.
    He must be the most underrated guitarist in the country. "Mighty Quinn" is a good commercial record, but I would rather hear the drumming of Mike Hugg and the guitar of Tom McGuiness brought out on a jazz or blues number. — NIGEL SUMMERLEY, Kettering, Northants. ● LP WINNER

    Thursday 1 February 1968
    France
    LE MONDE (page 13) les variétés ‘Les Animals Au « Musicorama »’ Par Claude Sarraute:
    Variety ‘THE ANIMALS AT “MUSICORAMA”’ by Claude Sarraute:
    This the best of the genre, the psychedelic genre. The Animals were not long to follow in the steps of the Who and the Yardbirds, these pioneers of the “break out heart” 1, but to do so they had to change their line-up and corporate name.
    Very honourably known since 1962, the band broke up in 1966 and reunited some months later around its singer, a lard-fat, short legged boy who likes to reveal - between the belt of too tight pants and the hem of a too short shirt - some attractive bulges; young English girls would eat them, so they say: Eric Burdon is seen as the height of seduction across the Channel and thrills the crowds in the literal sense.
    Around him, leant against huge metallic amplifiers, real strong-boxes of sound, a drummer with a beautiful face of Christ on the Cross, two guitarists and an electric violin specialist, eyes lost under meringues of frizzy hippie hair, manage to cover the wild screams and strident whistles of the kids (average age fifteen) who cheer them. The noise is flowing back, constant and powerful backwash, from the audience to the stage, as the spotlights flicker, red and green lights, as the large whirling wings of the light beams pass over the hectic band, as orange spirals dear to Delaunay2 draw in the background, as incense clouds rise, colours, smells and sounds collide and meet. The tone increases, high and strong. Obviously brought by chemical means, hysteria crashes to the exact bearable limit. Here, paradoxically, violence claims to be in the service of non violence.
    Less futuristic, more relaxed, the show Jimmy Hendrix then offers, claims to the same style. He's a black American, English by adoption, which features under a Mexican felt hat, colourful silk pyjamas and embroidered sheepskin vest. With him, musique concrète and pop music almost meet, and his "experience" appears at times such as a popularization of certain attempts previously reserved only to the musical domain. This is not surprising. Soon spread, quickly lost, influence waves today encompass both vertically and horizontally the farthest points of the history of art and geography.

    1What does he mean? The original quote was in English, so not a mis-translation
    2 French avant-garde painter 1885-1941, co-founder of the Orphism art movement

    Thursday 1 [?] February 1968
    UK
    MUSIC MAKER (page?) [full page photo of Jimi holding guitar vertical] ‘Jimi Hendrix Interview’
    (Page?) [small B&W photo, ‘‘On my first gig I got 75 cents and three hamburgers.”] Jimi Hendrixthe music maker interview’[interview 9 Oct ‘67, in Jimi's room, "Hotel St. Petersbourg", Paris] by Mike Hennessey: A little more than a year after leaving the colourful bohemia of New York's Greenwich Village where, after backing such established artists as Little Richard, Otis Redding and B. B. King, he was trying to make a name as an artist in his own right, Jimi Hendrix has, at twenty-one, been voted the best pop musician in the world by Melody Maker Readers. In Paris, where Mike Hennessey obtained this interview, the Jimi Hendrix Experience were topping the bill at the Olympia Theatre—the place where the trio made its first public appearance almost exactly one year ago. With his "electrocuted porcupine" hairstyle, his way-out clothes, which seem to be made out of woven herbaceous borders, and his furry boots, Jimi Hendrix looks a somewhat daunting prospect for an interview. "Who,” an ostentatiously English guest at Jimi's Paris hotel was heard to observe, "is that bloody savage?" But the slightly fearsome appearance is completely misleading. Jimi conducted this interview while lying naked in his hotel bed and despite a chronic lack of sleep— a scarcely avoidable hazard in Paris—he was disarmingly genial, relaxed and natural, and was utterly impervious to the barbs of impertinently provocative questions. From time to time he would just chuckle happily into his pillow when a question temporarily threw him, or amused him. It's a good test of anyone's equanimity to submit him to ninety minutes of probing questions when he is trying to catch up on sleep after a head-hammering night out. Jimi didn't even wince—neither during the interview nor at the end of it when the road manager came to get him out of bed for a photo call just when he was about to turn over for another couple of hours.
    ■ After a year in Britain, what is your opinion of the country?
    Britain is O.K.—but I wish we could play more places around the country. I miss playing in a lot of different places like we used to. But the problem is that we are doing more recording now and more tours abroad, so we don't get around England so much. We used to play different places every night of the week, but I guess it's not possible now.
    ■ How does the pop scene here compare with the scene in the States ?
    Oh, it's pretty much the same. In the States you've got the West Coast sound happening now—and there's the Motown sound and the Memphis sound. In England there seems to be a more earthy style emerging. I really like a lot of the English music that is happening now. The Eire Apparent, the Irish rhythm and blues group we worked at the Saville with—they're really good. And I liked the last record by the Marmalade.
    ■ Are you happier in England than you were in the States?
    Yeah—I'm much happier here because in the States I was always playing behind other people and I found it difficult to contain myself. It's O.K. at first, but then you get to a point where you can't stand any more. Of course it was great experience playing behind Joey Gee [sic, ‘Dee’], Little Richard, Chuck Jackson, Jackie Wilson, B. B. King, Otis Redding, the Isley Brothers and so on—but it's much better now I have my own group.
    ■ When did you first start playing guitar?
    Professionally when I was about fifteen or sixteen—I've been playing for about six years. My first gig was in Seattle, Washington, where I born. I got 75 cents and three hamburgers. Since then I've worked and lived all over the States.
    ■ Do you intend to return to the States?
    Not for the moment. I want to stay in England—and I understand there won't be any difficulty about getting work permits and so on as long as I'm a good little boy. I think I'd like to go back to the States eventually and buy a house in Hollywood.
    ■ Does the racial conflict in the States bother you ?
    I haven't had too much bother. I never paid too much attention to it. Seattle was an integrated city. I got pulled up by the police in Washington D.C. once and I was refused entry to one or two restaurants—but that was becaus I was with a couple of hippies. One of them looked a little like Sitting Bull. But it wasn't a racial thing.
    ■ Have you suffered from colour prejudice in Britain?
    Not really. I just don't get involved in it—as long as nobody doesn't bother me.
    ■ But how can you as a Negro fail to be involved in the racial problem?
    I don't even think about it.
    ■ Would you join a freedom march if you were asked?
    No, I don't think so. I'd really have to go into it very thoroughly before I took that much interest. I used to go on Sunday afternoons in Nashville to watch the fights downtown. But normally I just don't think along these lines. I have other more important things to do—like playing guitar. I'm not one of those political types.
    [small B&W photo, “Colour just doesn’t make any difference. Look at Elvis. . .”]
    ■ What do you think about the concept of Black Power?
    I don't think about it. Oh, there's a lot of silly talk on both sides. I'd have to get really involved in this before I could say anything.
    ■ But, as I said, aren't you automatically involved?
    I don't feel involved. I don't look at things in terms of races. I look at things in terms of people.
    ■ Some coloured musicians resent the fact that white people have had more money out of their music than they have. Do you?
    I haven't even thought about it.
    ■ But isn't it true that most white beat groups have derived their inspiration from coloured musicians and singers?
    I guess so—I've never thought about it.
    ■ You don't think that Negro culture has been exploited more for the benefit of white people than coloured people?
    Oh, man, people say things like that—but it's selfish and stupid. I always say let the best man win. If you can play the music—O.K. Whether you are black, white or purple. If somebody likes your music enough to be inspired by it, then that's fine. It's silly to say this kind of music can only be played by coloured people. Really, some people seem to think from their kneecaps. Colour just doesn't make any difference. Look at Elvis. He used to sing better when he sang the blues than when he started singing that beach party stuff. He could sing the blues—and he's white.
    ■ Who were your main influences?
    A lot of people—like Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly, Muddy Waters and different blues artists. I was largely influenced by blues artists when I first started.
    ■ How would you describe the kind of music you play now?
    I never think about it—until people start asking and trying to categorise it. Let's call it freak and funky music.
    ■ Your act was criticised in the States as being too erotic. What is your comment on this?
    Well, I suppose that came about because we were playing on the same bill as the Monkees and it was a bit of a contrast. We hadn't really played to that kind of kids' audience before and you have to realise that though the parents of the kids in England don't interfere too much, the parents in the States are something else. And then there are all those different kinds of stuffy organisations over there. We actually pulled out of that tour because there was a hassle. And we had a lot of other work coming up, including a tour of Scandinavia.
    ■ But is your act too erotic for kids?
    No. It's not really erotic. There's some sex in it I suppose and I might move around in certain ways and girls in the front seats might have funny expressions on their faces. But it's not downright sexy. My main thing is to put the words over. And I also like to entertain myself on the stage. I get tired of just standing up there. Our music isn't all that organised. We get on stage and start calling off tunes. We never have a set programme— we just play it by ear. So really anything can happen. But you've heard about American parents— and American people in general!
    [small B&W photo, “I'm really surprised by the success I've had”]
    ■ Do you think there is a more liberal moral climate in Britain?
    Definitely—and there's more understanding, too.
    ■ What do you think about being voted top musician in the MM pop poll?
    Oh, that's pretty groovy. It was very surprising, too, because I've only been playing in Britain a year. I'm really surprised by the success I've had. I still can't figure it all out yet—can't really understand it. But, of course, I'm glad. And I must say that Chas Chandler and Mike Jeffries helped a lot. When we first started playing there were a lot of question marks in people's faces and we didn't know whether they liked us or not. But it seems they did.
    ■ How did the famous Hendrix hairstyle develop?
    Well, I've always worn my hair pretty wild—it used to be longer than it is now. My dad used to cut it all the time when I was a kid and I used to go to school looking like a plucked chicken. Maybe that gave me a complex—so I had to start letting it grow. Now I just have the ends cut from time to time.
    ■ Did you have a happy home background as a kid ?
    Well, I stayed mostly at my aunt's and grandmother's. There were family troubles between my mother and father. My brother and I used to go to different homes because dad and mother used to break up all the time. Mostly my dad took care of me. He was a labourer, a gardener, and he'd once been an electrician. But we weren't too rich!
    ■ Do you still keep in touch with your family ?
    Yes. I still write home occasionally.
    ■ But you left home at sixteen.
    Yes. I joined the Army—and I was so bored. Army people tell you what to do all the time. I was in for fifteen months, then I broke my ankle and hurt my back in a parachute drop. That was about the best thing in the army—the parachute drops. I did about twenty-five. But the Army's really a bad scene. They wouldn't let me have any thing to do with music. They tell what you are interested in, and you don't have any choice. The Army is more for people who like to be told what to do.
    ■ After you came out of Army was it always your intention to get your own act together?
    Yeah. While I was backing those other artists I always had the idea that I would go on my own eventually. But it took me a little time get things together. Some things I do impetuously. But this I had to wait for.
    ■ You first started playing with your own group in the Village?
    Yes. And it was pretty tough at first. I was often in a situation where I didn't know where my next meal was coming from. People would say, "If you don't get a job you'll just starve to death." But I didn't want to take a job outside music. I tried a few jobs, including car delivery, but I always quit after a week or so. I'd worry a bit about not having any money—but not enough to go out and rob a bank. Then when Chas Chandler came over I decided I'd give England a try—I’d never been there before. Record companies had started to show a little interest in me when I was playing at the Café a Gogo. A year before Mick Jagger had tried to get me on a tour. But I wasn't really ready then [ie in Nov 1965. Ed.].
    ■ What sort of things bug you in the music business?
    I guess there are lots of little things that bug you. But I can't think of anything in particular.
    ■ You're a pretty happy guy, then?
    I guess so.
    ■ Do you ever lose your temper?
    Well, sometimes when you're resting after working for eighteen hours in a day and trying to have a quiet meal somewhere, you get annoyed when kids come in and bug you for autographs and pictures. I think this shows a complete lack of consideration. You get no kind of private, personal life in this business. Look at what they did to the Stones. People working in offices can get a private life, but not us.
    [small B&W photo, “You get no kind of private life in this business”]
    ■ Do you have a lot of girl friends?
    I used to have millions in the States. They kept me from starving when I was in the Village a year and a half ago. I didn't have a thing—no money, no job. I even had my guitar stolen. But those girls helped me. One of them even bought a guitar for me.
    ■ Can't girls also be a problem ?
    Yeah. Sometimes it's a problem to be nice to all of them. If they invite you to their place and you say no thanks then they think you are big-timing them. And half of them ask you such silly questions. Like when was the last time you saw John Lennon, and can you get the Box Tops' autographs. There's also a big challenge thing with some girls. They'll say, boasting, "Oh, I've been with him before," to their friends. And they'll say, "I wonder what it's like to sleep with John Walker?" There are always some who want to sleep with you. But there are others who you can actually talk to.
    ■ Do you have a steady girl friend?
    No. I used to. But I can't get along with just one girl. I don't like to be tied down too much.
    ■ Have you run much into the belief that coloured men are more virile than whites?
    Yeah, I've heard that. But there's nothing to it. It's got nothing to do with colour. It's just another stupid generalisation. Like they say Swedish girls have got no sense of humour. But in Stockholm I met some that had a great sense of humour.
    ■ Pop groups generally have greater privileges and opportunities when it comes to sex, but do you think they should set a moral example?
    I think pop groups have a right to their own private life—as I said before. People should judge them by what they do on stage—as singers and musicians. Their private life is their own business and people shouldn't know too much about that. You can't expect artists to be goody-goodies all the time. In any case kids aren't as dumb and easily influenced as some people think. They have a lot of common sense. Any kid that does something bad because a certain pop idol did it would probably have done it anyway.
    ■ Does marriage figure in your immediate plans?
    No. I've no intention of getting married. I really couldn't imagine it.
    [small B&W photo, “It's wrong to classify all drugs under one heading.”]
    ■ Are you religious?
    I used to believe in different things as a little boy. I believed that if you put a tooth under your pillow a fairy would come in the night and take the tooth and leave a dime. But as for now—well there are so many different beliefs going round. I believe there must be some kind of God—but there are so many different religions. I believe that human beings somehow just happened. So many things are unexplained. I don't really talk about religion. I was sent to church when I was a kid—and one time somebody got excited and hit me in the eye with their elbow. I guess that turned me off church. I suppose human beings have to believe in something—they feel they have to be directed in some way, have to have something to follow, regardless of whether it's true or not.
    ■ So what do you believe in?
    I believe in myself more than anything. And I suppose, in a way, that's also believing in God. If there is a God and He made you, then if you believe in yourself, you're also believing in Him. I think everybody should believe in himself. I don't believe in heaven and hell and all that stuff—but I suppose there must be something in religion.
    ■ For an increasing number of people, pot seems to have become a substitute for religion. What are your views on marijuana?
    I think smoking pot will probably be legalised in five or ten years. I don't, on the other hand, think drink is a good thing. They should carry out a big inquiry into the effects of pot just to see how harmful it really is. It seems to me to be silly to be sent to jail for smoking a natural
    plant. You've got winos and drunkards out in the streets begging for money and nobody seems to care about this. Yet some people will kill for a few cents to buy a drink. I think the situation will get itself together soon. This is just the beginning of the cold war between those who want pot and those who don't. One thing I am sure of—it's wrong to classify all drugs under one heading. Pot is completely different from hard drugs. I really don't see how anyone can put a needle in themselves. I had pneumonia when I was young and I used to scream and cry every time they put that needle in me.
    ■ Is there anything you regret in your life?
    Only that I didn't start singing and playing on my own much earlier. I also regret that I'm lazy—I used to write thousands of tunes, but I don't seem to get around to it now.
    ■ What are your plans for the future?
    First of all I'd like to see a lot more festivals in Britain. I'd really like to get a Monterey scene going. I'm also trying to work out a whole new concept of putting on a show— something more in the form of a play with good stage presentation, a completely different approach. But it will be some time before we get into it. I'll also be experimenting with different instrumentation. We'll keep the basic trio but add other musicians temporarily when we want a different sound. And finally, I'm looking forward to our six-week tour of the States which starts next February. But most of all right now I'm looking forward to going back to sleep.
    (But, unfortunately, he never made it!) ■
    (Page?) [letters page, title?] “I'M a guitarist and I am trying to play like Jimi Hendrix, but there is always something wrong with the sound. Could it be his guitar or his fuzz-box that makes the difference? Please ask him to help me.”— FERIT ERGIN, ANKARA. TURKEY.
    JIMI HENDRIX replies: “I've got about eight guitars, but the two I use most are a Fender Stratocaster and a Gibson Flying Angel which is shaped like a letter A, and is extremely rare in Britain. The only other one I know about is owned by Dave Davies, of the Kinks. On stage I use two Marshall and two Sound City 100-watt amplifiers and I find that this combinanation provides the sound I require coupled with reliability. Each amplifier has four 4 inch x 12 inch cabinets. But the secret of my sound is largely the electronic genius of our tame boffin, who is known to us as Roger the Valve! He has rewired my guitars in a special way to produce an individual sound and he has made me a fantastic fuzz-tone, which you can hear to good effect on our new LP. "Axis, Bold As Love". Actually, it's more of a sustain than a fuzz. He got a special sound out of the guitar on "One Rainy Wish" and "Little Miss Lover". It comes through a whole octave higher (doubles the frequency of the guitar) so that when playing high notes it sometimes sounds like a whistle or a flute. Whatever incredible sounds we think up, he manages to create them, but I want to emphasise that we seek only to get a variation of sound, not gimmicks.”
    (Page?) [large B&W Polydor pop art split-ad, looks like alien hands] [R.] Jimi Hendrix ‘Axis: Bold As Love[Track logo] [L.] Cream ‘Disraeli Gears’ [Immediate logo]

    Thursday 1 February 1968
    USA
    NEW YORK POST (page?) [B&W photo, ‘British pop stars (l-r) Ernie Grahame of Eire Apparent, Mitch Mitchell of Jimi Hendrix Experience, John Weider of Animals and Kevin Ayers of Soft Machine take U.S. in stride. They're here on tour. Post photo by Gummere]
    ‘British Rock Stars Clatter In To Town’ By Alfred G. Aronowitz: When the press conference was over,Jimi Hendrix sat behind a scotch and coke in the Copter Club on the top floor of the Pan Am building and talked about a girl friend in Buffalo who once sent him to the hospital with a stomach attack.
    "She really worked the roots [herbs] on me,” he said. “I mean she was into some kind of
    voodoo.”
    Jimi Hendrix had to go to England to become a pop star. When he tried to play Harlem's Apollo Theater a few years ago, the people took one look at his uncombed, frizzly hair and started mumbling things like, "Who does he think he is, a Black Jesus or something?"
    They Stand and Wait
    Last night, he arrived for an American tour with a troupe of 32, representing four English rock groups, and found several dozen reporters, magazine writers, radio interviewers and that CBS camera crew, waiting for him.
    Auother camera crew from ABC television would have been there to, but the press conference started more than an hour and half late.
    "Sometimes," Jimi Hendrix said, “the audience says ‘Hooray’ so loud it scares me out of my mind. I want to say, 'Not so loud.’ But I like it. It makes me feel like crying."
    Through the rain-dropped window, 58 stories below, he could see Park Av. pointing its tracer bullets at 96th. St. He left his home town of Seattle seven years ago and hasn't seen his fattier since.
    At 23, he can probably play the electric guitar better than anyone else in the pop-world. He can play it with his toes, his teeth, his nose and his elbows.
    "My father never heard me play," he said. "When I left home, I still hadn't gotten it together. I didn't start on the guitar till I was 16, 17. Kids today start to learn to play it when they're 4." The press conference was scheduled for 6:15 p.m. but the plane from London arrived 15 minutes late and helicopter flights from Kennedy Airport to the Pan Am heliport had been grounded by poor visibility all day. By the time the groups arrived by limousine, the canapes had run out and the photographers were taking pictures of themselves.
    A Missing Animal
    There was the Eire Apparent, a brand-new Irish group. There was the Soft Machine, which claims to create bridges between musical idioms.
    There was the Sensual Laboratory, a team of light show specialists who had just won the biennial award of the Arts Council of France.
    There was Eric Burdon and the Animals, minus Eric Burdon, who had missed the plane in London when customs officials demanded an additional duty payment on his America car.
    But the obvious star was Jimi Hendrix, who strode in wearing a green flowered jacket, a black hat with a purple band and checked madras pants.
    When his trio, the Jimi Hendrix Experience, released the first album last year, it rose to No. 6 on the pop charts.
    “Let’s start with LSD," a TV interviewer, asked him.
    "What do you want me to say?” answered Hendrix.
    "Should we legalize pot?" the TV interviewer asked.
    "Well, there are a lot of pot smokers and a lot of people will get busted if you don't." Hendrix answered.
    A Small Disturbance
    ■ The press conference broke up when a member of a television camera punched an advertising executive in the nose for getting in his way. With blood streaming down his face, the advertising executive got up on chair and called out, “If anybody saw me get hit will you please step forward and give me your name?"
    ■ When it was over, Jimi Hendrix sipped his scotch and coke and talked about going to a New York restaurant to get some soul food.
    “I can’t remember the last time I combed my hair," he said. "But see, it's not the long hairs that start trouble, it's the short hairs."

    Thursday 1 February 1968
    UK
    RECORD MIRROR (page?) TOP L.P.’s
    01. SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND Beatles (Parlophone)
    02. SOUND OF MUSIC Soundtrack (RCA)
    03. VAL DOONICAN ROCKS BUT GENTLY Val Doonlcan (Pye)
    04. GREATEST HITS Four Tops (Tamla Motown)
    05. BRITISH MOTOWN CHART BUSTERS Various Artistes (Tamla Motown)
    06. PISCES, AQUARIUS, CAPRICORN & JONES LTD. The Monkees (RCA Victor)
    07. REACH OUT Four Tops (Tamla Motown)
    08 THIRTEEN SMASH HITS Tom Jones (Decca)
    09. GREATEST HITS Supremes (Tamla Motown)
    10. THEIR SATANIC MAJESTIES' REQUESTS Rolling Stones (Decca)
    11. LAST WALTZ Engelbert Humperdinck (Decca)
    I2. AXIS-BOLD AS LOVE Jimi Hendrix Experience (Track)
    13. BREAKTHROUGH Various Artistes
    14. DISRAELI GEARS Cream (Reaction)
    15. WHO SELL OUT The Who (Track)
    16. MR. FANTASY Traffic (Island)
    17. BEST OF THE BEACH BOYS VOL. 2 Beach Boys (Capitol)
    18. OTIS BLUE Otis Redding (Atlantic)
    19. TOM JONES LIVE AT THE TALK OF THE TOWN Tom Jones (Decca)
    20. DOCTOR ZHIVAGO Soundtrack (MGM)

    Thursday 1 February 1968
    USA
    VILLAGE VOICE (page?) [B&W text ad]
    REAL ROCK
    rock music / interviews / pop news / reports
    105.9 FM
    EVERY SATURDAY MIDNIGHT to 5am
    The Biggest Playlist in the Country
    This Week : JIMI HENDRIX & MIKE BLOOMFIELD – on tape
    PAUL WILLIAMS, editor of Crawdaddy live

    Thursday 1 February 1968
    Canada (MB)
    WINNIPEG FREE PRESS (page 56) [B&W sale ad. 20 Lp’s 9 pictured, inc. AYE. Only other ‘rock’ album is Paul Butterfield] EATON’S. Save, Popular LP Records $3.69
    “JIMI HENDRIX has a real ‘Experience’.”

    [Day?] February 1968
    USA
    ARGO (page?) [B&W ad]
    Kappa Sigma in conjunction with Barry Lawrence presents in a pillow concert
    The JIMI HENDRIX EXPERIENCE
    plus the SOFT MACHINE and the EAST SIDE KIDS
    lights by the Soft Machine
    Feb. 11 Robertson Gym
    Students $2,50 Public $3.00
    Tickets on sale at Benwitts, UCen, Car/Stereo and the Record Rack.

    [Day?] February 1968
    UK
    BEAT INSTRUMENTAL (page ?) ‘1967 Gold Star Awards’: Recording Vocalist: 10. Eric Burdon, 11. Donovan, 12. Jimi Hendrix; Lead Guitarist: 1. Clapton, 2. Jimi Hendrix; 3. Hank Marvin, Bass Guitarist: 1. Jack Bruce, 2. Noel Redding, 3. Paul McCartney; Drummer: 1. Ginger Baker, . Keith Moon, 3. George Bennet, 4. Mitch Mitchell; [B&W photo, ‘Jimi Hendrix Experience’] Best Group On Stage: 1. Jimi Hendrix Experience; 2. Who; 3. Cream. Recording Manager: 6. Chas Chandler; 7. Kit Lambert. Song Writing Team: 1. Lennon/McCartney; 2. Shadows; 3. Jimi Hendrix.

    [Day?] February 1968
    USA (Los Angeles, UCLA)
    DAILY BRUIN [?] (page?) [B&W text ad]
    The Jimi Hendrix Experience
    England’s Underground Sensation
    The Soft Machine
    with The Mark Boyle Sense Laboratory
    Tuesday, February 13, 1968
    AU Grand Ballroom 8:00 P.M.
    Tickets $2.00 At KH Ticket Office

    [Day?] February 1968
    Nederlands
    MUZEIK PARADE (page?) [large B&W photo of Jimi in Ringo flat & ¾ page blw up of stage profile]Jimi Hendrix: I Am Often Treated Very Rudely’:
    Mr. Jimi Hendrix is doing just fine! Not long ago he was playing for very little money in all kinds of beat clubs.
    Fortunately he was discovered and currently he is one of the best paid teen stars. Jimi is not at home much. A little tour here, a little tour there. Anyway, a normal job for a pop star. Yet it’s a shame that Jimi is more away than at home. He has a beautiful home, magnificent -furniture (in French style), two telephones, a television set, and a collection of daggers [note: the militaria collection was Chas’; Burdon & Jeffery also collected militaria, especially blades, eg Nazi daggers, Jap swords etc. Ed.]. “Nice couch, right? I just love that stuff. It has to have a lot of gold in it. You can see this from the coats I wear now and then. Those are riddled with gold thread. To tell the truth it's a waste to furnish a house of a pop star nicely. You’re never there and when you are at home and you want to relax, there's always somebody dropping by. To do an interview or something...
    Anyway, I don't care so much.
    I like this life much better than the life of a poor musician who has to play all night for a few bucks. They say I ask a lot of money for my shows. That's bullshit. I look at it from a business point of view. When I play the whole theatre is packed and the promoters let the people who come to see me pay a good price. Why do only the promoters have to benefit...?
    I am the guy who the kids come to see.
    A pop star lives for a short time...
    Okay, then they have to pay me good as well. It may sound crude, but the life of a pop star is short. I mean, in two or three years they might not even know who Jimi Hendrix is. Okay, that's not bad, but Jimi has to eat and drink too and wants to enjoy things after three years from now. Well, if you want this, you have to take care that when you are still famous you have to earn as much money as possible. That's only normal. On the other hand you spend a lot of money. I don't have many days off, but when I do I enjoy myself as much as I can. My style of guitar playing is copied a lot these days. Yes, I know this. It makes me very happy. It's just great to know that many people all over the world look at you and then exactly
    copy what you did. I hate bands that go on stage and not give it all. Those cats that only play for the money. When they are still unknown they go all the way, but after two hit records they take it for granted and they show up as the big boys. Fortunately people take notice of these groups more and more. I think that's just great. That people become critical. They don't swallow all the big guys do. Nowadays you will have to work damn hard to stay at the top. Also, I can't stand that people don't look at you or treat you very rude, just because you don't
    happen to have a parting in the middle of your hair and wear a neat ready-made suit. I mean what does it matter what you wear and how you wear your hair? Those people who are dressed in stiff suits and who do their best not to stand out are often terrible bastards. So it has nothing to do with how you are dressed. Man. you should see how they treat me in restaurants. I really have to do my best not to get hold of those guys. Anyway, you get used to it.
    I can be very difficult
    In TV studios I can be very difficult, I know. That's just because I don't want to play-back. TV directors are only interested in the nice shot they want to capture. But I don't care about that. I'm only interested in the music. That's the most important thing for me. Let them play my
    record instead and have a few beautiful girls dance to it. Then they have their nice shot.
    Plans for the future? Well, I don't care much about that. It's the same as with my shows: I see it when I get there. I never make plans ahead. It has to be spontaneous. I do want to make a lot of money for later on, but I already said that. For the rest... To make music for as long as possible.
    (Pages?) [very large B&W, ink pen, psyche, fold-out poster] Jimi Hendrix Experience [psyche text]

    [Day?] February 1968
    Switzerland
    POP (page?) [B&W ad, photos of groups & text] POP MONSTERKONZERT
    30 And 31 May
    Hallenstadion Zurich.
    The Jimi Hendrix Experience
    Eric Burdon And The New Animals
    The Traffic The Cream
    The Koobas Anselmo Trend
    During his last stay in England H. R. Jaggi also took the opportunity to orient Eric Burdon and Jimi Hendrix on the exact course of the concert. He met the two at midnight in London Celebrity Club "Speakeasy." ► [B&W photo of Jimi, Burdon & Jaggi]

    [Day?] February 1968
    Switzerland
    POPFOTO (page?) [two page B&W photo, TOTPs 1966, ‘Jimi Hendrix Experience’.]

    [Day?] February 1968
    UK
    RAVE (page?) The Informer:
    ■ Chas Chandler on the list as a footballer
    ■ Viv Stanshall of the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band married on New Year’s Day
    ■ Why does Scott Walker want a plastic elbow?
    ■ Why was a large white horse parked outside Kit Lambert’s flat over Christmas and where was the rider to be—Jimi Hendrix?
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    ■ Is the "love song" disappearing from the pop scene? You know the one I mean—"moon — June — romance—dance". Well one man who believes it is and has good reason for saying so is Rolling Stone Brian Jones.
    "People want songs that say something important now," says Brian. "Look at the compositions of Traffic, the Kinks, Hendrix, the Beatles and the Who. They all comment or say something important."
    (Page?) [B&W photo of group] ■ Ex-Animal Chas Chandler, the man who discovered Jimi Hendrix, has a new group under his wing that he hopes are destined for as much fame in '68 as Jimi. They're called the Eire Apparent, a young Irish group with a new record out called "Follow Me", released on Track Records and written by two of the Flowerpot Men. Dave, Chris, Ernie and Henry, as the Eire Apparent like to be known, were a top group in Ireland.

    [Day?] February 1968
    UK
    UNIT (cover) [full page 3 colour silk screen print of Jimi’s face with psyche vibations around it]
    (Page?) [B&W Monterey, ‘(photo: Ray Stevenson.) Interview edited from conversation with
    Steve Barker.’] [interview 8 November, Manchester University Students’ Union]
    ‘JIMI HENDRIX’ [in psyche text] by Steve Barker:
    —The blurb on your first LP says you are trying to create, create, create. Are you satisfied with what you are creating?
    'We like to have our own sound, but we're not satisfied, not yet. You might be pleased with what you're doing once in a while, but never really satisfied. We're pleased with the LP we've just finished for instance. But the ideas we got out of it could go on to our next one.'
    —How does the Experience get such fusion when you are basically a blues-man, Noel a rock man and Mitch a jazzman?
    'I don't know! Actually this is more like a free-style thing. We know what song we're going to play and what key it's in, and the chord sequence and we just take it from there'
    —How far can you go with the music you're playing now?
    'I don't know. You can go on until you bore yourself to death I guess. You got to try something else. I think I'll start all over again and come back as a king bee.'
    —You write all your own material, where does it come from?
    'Just from me. We go to clubs a lot and go all around in taxis and you happen to see a lot of things. You see everything, experience everything as you live. Even if you're living in a little room, you see a lot of things if you have imagination. The songs just come.'
    -Loneliness is such a drag?
    'That's what it is really sometimes. That was the song I liked best of all we did. I'm glad it didn't get big and get thrown around.'
    —Does this mean you're an introvert?
    'Well, sometimes. Right then when I wrote 'Midnight Lamp' I was. I was feeling kind of down like that. But really I have to catch myself and find out. So you go into different moods and when you write your mood comes through. So you can go back and listen to your records and know how you were feeling then and how your moods change at different times.
    —But loneliness is such a drag is a whispery quiet thing. How come you put these words in among powerful extrovert stuff?
    'I like to play loud. I always did like to play loud. The worlds of the song just come. I don't know how it comes about, it starts off quiet until we get into it.'
    —How much do you owe to a blues background?
    'Not necessarily anything! I went south and just listened to the way the people played blues guitar and I dug it. But then I like a lot of other things too. That's why we try to do our own stuff, make something new.'
    —There's a lot of controversy over the responsibilities of pop stars. Do you you yourself feel any?
    'That's silly. Whatever a cat does in his private life should be his own business. Everybody knows this, but you can say it a million times and it still won't get through to some people. I don't really feel responsible too much to myself. Maybe that's all.'
    —Do you ever feel like going away and sorting yourself out like maybe Dylan did?
    'I think that's going to have to happen soon anyway because everyone's getting so tired and you work so hard sometimes and it gets to be really frustrating.’
    —How come you got caught up in the hippy scene.
    'It just happened to come about that we were around at the time of pschedelia and all the in-clothes. I dug that scene, but not necessarily what you call the hippy scene, because I don't like classification anyway. Regardless of the scene, we just happened to be playing freak-out and psychedelic things, but it does bother us because psychedelia only means mind expansion anyway. I can't hear a single word the Pink Floyd are saying. There's so many other types of music. We just happened to be in that groove, that bag right then.'
    —Do you try to communicate by words or sound when you're on stage or both? Because the words never usually come out.
    'Most of the songs we're doing now, people know the words, I think, but it probably doesn't mean much to them. They just want somebody to break their neck on stage.'
    — Does that mean that you write primarily for yourself?
    'Oh definitely. One song we did called 'I don't live today' was dedicated to the American Indian and all minority depression groups. All I did was just use a few words and they said 'what does that mean. That doesn't mean anything', because there was only three or four lines in there anyway.'
    — How about Donovan and his little scene?
    ‘He’s nice, kinda sweet! He's a nice little cat in his own groove, all about flowers and people wearing golden underwear. I like Donovan as a person, but nobody is going to listen to this 'love' bit. I like Dylan's music better because it’s more earthy and live. 'Mellow Yellow' is slang in the States for really groovy, ‘Sunshine Superman' means that he can get his girl. Anyway that's my interpretation. I'd like to play some sessions with Dylan, his group ought to be more creative. These days people think that everyone else ought to have trips and everyone is singing about trips.'
    — How about straight piss taking like the Mothers?
    ‘I like to listen to them, but we do our own thing. You know we had a chance to go into that bag because everybody's mind is still open. But we decided that we didn't want to go that way completely towards strict freakout.’
    — Are there any pressures on you as to what material you record?
    ‘No none at all. We're just writing and playing what we want. But our moods change, like once we wanted to do a Dylan song as one of our singles. Then we wanted this and that, but we always wind up doing our own regardless whether they flop or not. At least we're doing our own thing. If you do someone else's song every fifth single, it shows something is missing. But you just don't throw anything out on record. I like to be involved and I like music. The same old story. All that goody goody stuff. Music is a love to me. The money's great too.'
    — What level are you aiming for when you make a record, the kids?
    ‘No not necessarily. We quite naturally want people to like it. That's the reason for putting the record out. You see I have no taste. I couldn't say what's a good record and what's a bad one really. I don't have no feelings about commercial records. I don't know what a commercial record really is. So what we do is write and try to get it together as best as possible for anybody who'd really dig it. It doesn't make any difference who.'
    — How big a part do visuals take in your stage act?
    'I get a kick out of playing. It's the best part of the whole thing. You just do it when you feel like it sometimes. I used to feel like it. But not anymore man, you would have a heart attack if you were doing it every night like we were doing three or four months ago. We'd be dead by this time. You can't do it right unless you feel it. Half of the things I do I don't even know it because I just felt like it at the time. If you have everything planned out and one little thing goes wrong you think 'Oh, what am I supposed to be doing now. Oh yeah, I'm supposed to be going like this ... Hi everybody, I'm doing it'.'
    At this point a young lady from the 'Manchester Independent' asked Mr. Hendrix as to whether there was anything he wanted materially. This question was slightly distorted by an outburst of primitive laughter from the male section of the gathered assembly. She asked if there was anything left.
    'There's a whole lot of things left. Thousands of them. I see them downtown everyday. Millions of them! Marvellous!'
    — What about the Beatles and the things they're doing now?
    'I think it's good. The're one group you really can't put down because they're just too much and it's so embarrassing, man, when America is sending over the Monkees. I am so embarrassed that American could be so stupid as to make somebody like that. They could have at least done it with a group that has something to offer. The've got groups in the States that are starving to death, trying to get breaks and then these fairies come up.'
    —Do you ever think of going back to the States?
    'I think about it every single day. I really miss it. Like the west coast. Nothing has to happen to me. I just like to be out there. I like the weather, the scenery and some of the people. You can have a chocolate milkshake in a drug store, chewing gum at a gas station and soup from little machines on the road. It's great, it's beautiful. It's all screwed up and nasty and prejudiced. And it has everything.'
    (Page?) [B&W photo, ‘John Peel’] ‘RELAXED HENDRIX’
    'Then of course, Hendrix has some superb ideas. It is interesting really because Hendrix is more relaxed now. The first LP was incredibly exciting but at the same time a bit frightening too, because there was a sort of anger and violence in it. I must admit though, that Hendrix, on stae is a drag. I don't like all this erotic crap because I don't think it's necessary. You can play the guitar a hell of a lot if you're not pretending to be stuffing it. I just think that he is enough of a musician to be able to stand up without doing it.'
    'Donovan is getting so good now. I don't know what he is like as a person, and I think this is important, but I think his songs are just exactly right.

    [Day?] February 1968
    Sweden
    VI-UNGE (page?) [group colour photo]Jimi Hendrix Experience’: The Jimi Hendrix Experiencewas truly something of an experience when the group visited this country for the first time last year. Since then there has been several efforts to bring Jimi and his band here for a return visit, but each effort has come to nothing for various reasons. Forum in Copenhagen would happily have invitedJimi as one of the main attractions of this autumn's Teen '67 exhibition, but decided not to on second thoughts. !t was feared that many of the fans wanting to come see Jimi play would be denied entry, as the fire laws are strict on how many people are to be admitted to the big hall. And there were enough exhibits as it were, perhaps particularly on that day.
    But on January 7th, the concert went ahead at Tivolis Koncertsal, and it was proven once more that Jimi Hendrix - like Cream - is one of the new really exciting pop acts. The tickets sold out in record time.

    [Day?] February? 1968
    UK?
    [UNKNOWN paper] (page?) [large B&W photo of Jimi looking rather ‘smoothe’] ‘Jimi Hendrix, trend-setter extraordinaire’ by [unknown]: "The mini skirt was quite naturally the best thing that happened in 1967—and I could really dig seeing them and more lace blouses in 1968! And American Indian style gear with balloon sleeves and very soft material for contrast. What would be great too would be more short Roman robes— you know, something like Helen of Troy only shorter. As for me, in 1968 I'll be wearing a coffin if I don't take care of myself. If not that, I will be in a lot of Spanish gear, I really love it. I send my love to the short-robe wearers of 1967."

    [Date?] February [?] 1968
    USA (Phoenix, AZ)
    [UNKNOWN] (page?) [B&W psyche pic ad] Monday Feb. 5th *** Admission $3.00
    [negative image] THE JIMI HENDRIX EXPERIENCE With The Soft Machine, Live At Live, Sun Devil’s Gym, ASU, Tempe, 8 O’clock
    Presented By Sigma Chi Fraternity
    Ticket Outlets: Bob’s Records - Central & Camelback, Murray’s Stereo - Phoenix, Serendopity- Scottsdale, Melody Shop - Tempe, ASU Campus from only Sigma Chi

    [Date?] February [?] 1968
    USA (Los Angeles, CA)
    [UNKNOWN] (page?) [B&W text ad] The Jimi Hendrix Experience
    England’s Underground Sensation
    The Soft Machine
    with the Mark Boyle Sense Laboratory
    Tuesday, February 13, 1968
    A.U. Grand Ballroom 8: P.M.
    Tickets $2.00 at KH Ticket Office

    [Date?] February [?] 1968
    USA (Denver, CO)
    [UNKNOWN] (page?) [B&W text ad] See The
    Jimi Hendrix [Love hearts with arrow pic.]
    Experience
    Valentine’s Day
    Wednesday 14 February 1968
    Admission $3.00 8:30 – 11:00 P.M.
    Denver’s only appearance
    Tickets Available
    Last edited by stplsd; 09-19-17 at 04:16 PM.
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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