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Thread: 1968-03-03 Vets Memorial Auditorium, Columbus, Ohio USA

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    1968-03-03 Vets Memorial Auditorium, Columbus, Ohio USA

    Sunday, March 3rd, 1968

    Tax Free
    Fire
    ??

    Partial recording exists
    Last edited by Olvator; 03-21-11 at 06:34 AM.

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    Re: 1968-03-03 Vets Memorial Auditorium, Columbus, Ohio USA

    Here is an original poster from this show.
    I acquired it 30 years ago from a fellow in Columbus, Ohio, who purportedly acquired it from one of the Four O'Clock Balloon's guitarists.
    The story goes that the musician was down on his luck, took the poster off his wall, and tried to sell it to a Columbus pawn shop back in the mid 70's.
    The pawn shop offered nothing, but the guy I got it from offered the guitarist $20 and it was sold on the street in front of the store.

    Attachment 6756

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    Re: 1968-03-03 Vets Memorial Auditorium, Columbus, Ohio USA

    great post souldoggie, thanks!!!

    Actually a partial recording of this show exists, but it is in VERY bad shape, with lots of speed problems. Unbearable....

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    Re: 1968-03-03 Vets Memorial Auditorium, Columbus, Ohio USA

    Yeah, thanks SD, nice story. I posted a reply earlier but it doesn't seem to have made it, strange.

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    Re: 1968-03-03 Vets Memorial Auditorium, Columbus, Ohio USA


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    Re: 1968-03-03 Vets Memorial Auditorium, Columbus, Ohio USA

    Last edited by billo528; 03-31-16 at 08:20 AM.

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    Re: 1968-03-03 Vets Memorial Auditorium, Columbus, Ohio USA

    02.
    Sunday 3 March 1968
    Columbus, Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 300 W. Broad St, OH, USA. JHE

    Neville: “(DROVE 474 MILES). VETERANS AUDITORIUM COLUMBUS OHIO. $200 ($100 Wages). Drove through Lincoln tunnel, down NJ turnpike, over Delaware Bridge, then on to Pensylvania turnpike. Started to go over mountains to Pitsburgh about 12:00 dinner time, a snow storm started. Very Very! bad on road could hardly drive van, loads of accidents, lots of cars and lorries had come off road. Right on the top it was very bad! Started coming down again, big accident, 2 or 3 cars including police car. There was a car which had skidded from other lane of traffic upside down over crash rail in middle of express. It had taken top completely off car. I think there were some dead people in it, it had just happened.
    Slowed down from 50mph (– 20). Shit myself. Finally came down to lower ground and better weather. Changed roads and headed for OHIO. We passed a town called WHEELING. As big as Portsmouth. Only it was all old cowboy houses, all built of wood [‘hundred’?]. Just like a ghost town with people there. Drove on to COLUMBUS through Indian country, arrived 5:00 at hotel. Went to gig, set up. 2 other groups.”
    Concert at 19:30
    Support: Soft Machine with The Mark Boyle Sensual Laboratory light show; Dantes; Four O’Clock Balloon.

    Songs:

    Tax Free (18) (Bo Hansson & Janne Carlsson)
    Fire (94)
    and others unknown

    Neville Chesters: “. . .had Strat! Stolen, new one. Did show, not bad. Packed all gear up and loaded van. Very ang annoyed about GUITAR I had just bought day before, got back to the hotel 3:30. I arranged to stay on for a day. Hugh flew his equip back to N.Y.”
    [“Show not bad.., Jimi had a Strat stolen, the one I had purchased the day before.” – somebody ‘tidying up’ Neville’s original? ‘purchased’ - puke]

    Hugh Hopper: “We got there really late. I mean really, really late, and we needed some help to carry the gear In. Everybody was sort of taking stuff in, and some guy walked away with it... I think Fender gave Jimi about three or four during that tour.”

    Ricki C. (fan): “The first time I ever saw a Marshall amplifier, let alone the fucking WALL of Marshall amplifiers that Hendrix and bass player Noel Redding employed; the first time us Kids From The 60's called a live performance a concert instead of it being a rock & roll show.
    Seeing Jimi Hendrix live really was astounding. It was everything live rock & roll should embody. First off, it was overpoweringly, scary, great LOUD. And Hendrix put on a SHOW - playing his white Stratocaster behind his back, with his teeth, humping said Marshall stacks with said Fender - pretty much all the things he did in the Monterey Pop film, only for an hour instead of the few minutes he was in the movie. He was certainly lewd & lascivious (I'm not sure my little Catholic-boy brain had fully processed exactly what "Let me stand next to your fire" entailed before that night), but simultaneously really FUNNY. At one point in the show, somehow - by some sonic freak of nature - Hendrix's Wall Of Marshalls starting picking up WCOL-AM, the local Top 40 radio station, while The First Edition's "Just Dropped In To See What Condition My Condition Was In" was playing. (In retrospect, I don't think I've ever heard Jimi Hendrix and Kenny Rogers in such close proximity ever again in the intervening time.) Jimi turned the master amp volume WAY up so the audience could hear the Rogers' tune, played along with it for about a minute, said, "Ooooo, psychedelic music," and launched into a blistering take on "Foxy Lady," all without missing a beat. It was hilarious. It was classic. I remember it like it was yesterday, and it was 45 years ago.
    I don't remember everything The Experience played. I think they did the large majority of the first album. I know they played "Red House," a song I had never heard, the song that Hit Parader magazine informed me had been left off the American version of Are You Experienced. I know Noel Redding and Mitch Mitchell were truly great and Mitchell was probably the best drummer I had ever witnessed, until the next year, November 1969, when I saw Keith Moon with The Who. I know it was one of the greatest live shows I ever saw.”

    Barry Hayden (vox, Dantes): “[I don’t remember much about the show]. I was stage left, between the second or third curtain, I had a straight-on shot of Mitch Mitchell’s kick-drum foot. It was the fastest kick-drum foot I’d ever seen, I watched that all night and couldn’t believe how he did it.
    [Before the show, all the bands on the bill—including Soft Machine, and Four O’Clock Balloon, another local Columbus favorite—shared the same dressing room.
    I wore a silk scarf around my neck that night. When Hendrix entered the dressing room, he, too, was wearing a scarf,] but it was tied differently. I kept looking at it, trying to figure it out. I finally went over to him and asked him about it. He says, ‘You’re tying it like an American ties it.’ I did the crossover thing, like a necktie. He says, ‘Let me show you how the British tie it.’ And he showed me. And I tied it like Jimi forever after that. What the hell? If Jimi Hendrix says this is the way you’re supposed to do it, that’s the way you do it. It’s not open debate.”

    Lynn Wehr (rhythm guitar, Dantes): “[I don’t remember much about the show]. I don’t even remember what he played. I remember there was a cover or two. I believe he did ‘Hang On Sloopy [yeah, right Ed.].’
    [After the scarf-tying lesson], Barry said, ‘Hey, we’re having a party afterward. Would you guys like to come?’ Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding immediately said, ‘No.’ But Hendrix said, ‘Yes.’ We were like, ‘Wow. OK.’
    [After the show, I arranged to pick up Hendrix at the Christopher Inn [hotel], on Broad Street, where the Experience was staying, and take him back to the house on Howey Road, a couple of blocks south of Hudson Street, that the Dantes used as a party house and rehearsal space.]
    We get to the Christopher Inn—I think Jack White, the drummer for Four O’Clock Balloon was with me—and it’s late, probably after midnight, and there’s one guy at the desk. We told him we were there to pick up Jimi Hendrix. Here we were, a couple of guys in polka-dot pants and long hair. I’m sure we looked like groupies. And the guy at the desk says, ‘He’s not staying here.’ But we were like, ‘Look, we just were on the show with him at Vets, we told him we’d pick him up.’ We must have been convincing enough, because the guy picks up the phone and makes a call. Then he turns around, kind of sheepish like, and tells us, ‘He’ll be right down.’
    Not five minutes later, the elevator doors open and out steps Hendrix, colorful, flowing clothes, a big hat with a big feather in it, completely dressed the part.
    [Hendrix climbed in the passenger seat of the Dantemobile, a blue Chevy Caprice station wagon with “Dantes” in letters down the side]. We started down High Street, and when we got to campus, students were still out doing their thing. Every time we’d stop at a stop light, they’d see the Dantes car, turn and look and see Hendrix sitting in the passenger seat, and start running. The light would change and I’d speed away before they could catch us, until the next light, and the same thing would happen. We were like the Pied Piper, with kids running after us down High Street.
    [The Howey Street house wasn’t much—nothing but a few mattresses thrown on the floor, egg cartons stapled to the walls of the basement to help muffle the sound during rehearsals.] We basically had nothing to offer him. We asked what he’d like, and he said he’d enjoy a glass of red wine [I’m beginning to smell shite. Ed.]. We all kind of looked at each other and thought, ‘What do we do now?’ Fortunately, one of the girls there said she lived close and could get a bottle. In short order, she came back with a bottle that she probably took from her parents. We sat around on the floor and talked and drank the bottle.
    There were no drugs of any kind, nothing crazy. He was really soft-spoken, nice, mild-mannered—nothing like the guitar-burning wild man you’d see on stage. I think we just talked about music. He wasn’t put out. I think he genuinely wanted to be there. It was a scene.
    After about an hour or so, he says, ‘Hey, I’ve really enjoyed being with you guys but have to get up early.’ I think he had a gig in New York the next day. So we got in the car and I drove him back to the Christopher Inn.
    I looked at it like we were all peers. It was another gig. We were happy about it for sure, because we liked him. But we basically had the same clothes, the same gear.
    I realize now, in later years, it was a big deal. It’s cool. I’m glad I get to talk about it now. But I miss it. It’s not the same now as it was. I liked it better then. I feel bad for anybody who didn’t grow up when we did. Being a teenager was just about the best thing you could be. We ruled. To be truthful, if you brought a time machine to my house, I’d set it for 1964 and leave right now.”

    Mitch: “Around this time, though, we actually managed three days off [four actually Ed.], so I flew to the Bahamas with a girlfriend. Noel joined us, which was odd because he really doesn't like sunshine, beyond the odd hour lying by the pool. He gave it all of three hours, whereupon he decided he hated the Bahamas and flew straight back again.”

    Noel: “4,5,6 Bahamas with Mitch.”

    “Jeffery acted like a member of the Nassau tourist board, talking up all the great opportunities awaiting the sharp investor (me?). What did I want with a piece of unoccupied Caribbean land? Jeffery made it sound like heaven, so Mitch and I relented and flew down to have a look. Heaven it wasn't. One look at us and the hotel lost our reservations and we were shunted off to $100-a-day rooms in another hostelry designed to separate the tourist from his money as quickly as possible. The weather was relaxing, but we were constantly hassled by
    Idiots about our long hair. Nassau. . .the heat was nice, but in the long run a sauna would have been better.
    It was, none the less, a welcome break from touring. February and March had been killers.”[Well February was, no doubt, a bit of a slog, but you were only 3 days into March, so March was hardly ‘a killer’, and the tour was slowing down, with many east coast and NY state gigs (so several days and nights could be spent back in Jimi’s home town – New York – between some gigs) and would be finished on 6 April Ed.]

    Monday 4 March 1968
    Neville: “DAY OFF OHIO. Got up 12:00 tried to reserve room but hotel said they’d already let it (LIARS!) so I checked in HOLLYDAY INN. Packed got taxi to airport Holiday Inn checked in then went in taxi to airport. Collected van which Hugh had left, drove back into town. Went to radio shop and bought a radio for van. Bought a motorola, great! Tried to fit it in but it was getting dark. Went back to hotel, washed, went down to restaurant had a great meal. Watched T.V. for a few hours, went to bed 12:00. Crashed!

    Tuesday 5 March 1968
    Neville: “DRIVE BACK TO NEW YORK (474 Miles) Got up 9:00 had breakfast, got dressed. Went to radio shop, got instructions for fitting radio and fit it in. It worked quite good. Set off to drive to New YORK, didn’t feel to good, left COLUMBUS 2:30. Drove up to Wheeling, had a look round for half an hour then set off again. Didn’t stop again til I got to NEW YORK, except for petrol. Drove across OHIO, over PENSYLVANIA and up New JERREY turnpike. Arrived NEW YORK at Scene Club 12:30. Not bad going. Stayed at Scene for a couple fo hours, nothing happening, came back to hotel, checked and went to bed, very tired.”
    Last edited by stplsd; 04-29-18 at 12:43 PM.

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    Re: 1968-03-03 Vets Memorial Auditorium, Columbus, Ohio USA

    http://rickic614.blogspot.com/2013/1...-jimi.html?m=1


    Shows I Saw In The 1960's, part three; The Jimi Hendrix Experience, 3/3/1968 and The Doors, 11/2/1968

    This is the third (and final) installment of a series about my favorite 60's concerts.
    Part one, Bob Dylan & the Hawks appeared May 3rd, 2012; part two, The Who, December 7, 2012.


    The Jimi Hendrix Experience / Veteran's Memorial Auditorium / Sunday, March 3rd, 1968

    I know the exact date of this show because sometime in the 2000's an old friend bought me a reproduction of the original poster advertising the show (see below). It was a show that marked a lot of firsts for me: the first show I attended with Dave Blackburn, my best friend & bandmate who taught me more about music than any other person on the planet (see blog entry The Guitar / The Band / Dave Blackburn, February 12th, 2012) after we discovered our mutual love of The Who junior year of high-school; the first time I ever saw a Marshall amplifier, let alone the fucking WALL of Marshall amplifiers that Hendrix and bass player Noel Redding employed; the first time us Kids From The 60's called a live performance a concert instead of it being a rock & roll show.

    Seeing Jimi Hendrix live really was astounding. It was everything live rock & roll should embody. First off, it was overpoweringly, scary, great LOUD. And Hendrix put on a SHOW - playing his white Stratocaster behind his back, with his teeth, humping said Marshall stacks with said Fender - pretty much all the things he did in the Monterey Pop film, only for an hour instead of the few minutes he was in the movie. He was certainly lewd & lascivious (I'm not sure my little Catholic-boy brain had fully processed exactly what "Let me stand next to your fire" entailed before that night), but simultaneously really FUNNY. At one point in the show, somehow - by some sonic freak of nature - Hendrix's Wall Of Marshalls starting picking up WCOL-AM, the local Top 40 radio station, while The First Edition's "Just Dropped In To See What Condition My Condition Was In" was playing. (In retrospect, I don't think I've ever heard Jimi Hendrix and Kenny Rogers in such close proximity ever again in the intervening time.) Jimi turned the master amp volume WAY up so the audience could hear the Rogers' tune, played along with it for about a minute, said, "Ooooo, psychedelic music," and launched into a blistering take on "Foxy Lady," all without missing a beat. It was hilarious. It was classic. I remember it like it was yesterday, and it was 45 years ago.

    I don't remember everything The Experience played. I think they did the large majority of the first album. I know they played "Red House," a song I had never heard, the song that Hit Parader magazine informed me had been left off the American version of Are You Experienced. I know Noel Redding and Mitch Mitchell were truly great and Mitchell was probably the best drummer I had ever witnessed, until the next year, November 1969, when I saw Keith Moon with The Who. I know it was one of the greatest live shows I ever saw. I know it was one of the shows that ruined me for much of 1970's lunkhead rock & roll. How was I supposed to take fucking Bachman-Turner Overdrive or Montrose or REO Speedwagon seriously? I had seen JIMI HENDRIX play the guitar live.

    I know that whenever I see a clip of Hendrix - however brief - it always brings back that feeling in the pit of my stomach that only 60's rock & roll concerts gave me: when everything was new; when everybody played like their lives depended on it (and for Hendrix, Jim Morrison and Janis Joplin, it turned out they pretty much did); when people played music like you had never heard it, when people stalked stages like you had never seen, when you had your whole life laid out in front of you and everything was going to be fabulous from that night onward.

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    Re: 1968-03-03 Vets Memorial Auditorium, Columbus, Ohio USA

    The night Jimi Hendrix partied with the Dantes in Linden

    The Columbus Monthly By Eric Lyttle

    Posted Mar 3, 2018

    “If you brought a time machine to my house, I’d leave right now.”

    Fifty years ago tonight, Jimi Hendrix was sitting on the floor inside a small, nearly empty house in Linden enjoying a post-concert glass of red wine. No, not London. Linden. As in the working class neighborhood of northeast Columbus.

    Lynn Wehr doesn’t remember much about the show itself. Neither does Barry Hayden. The two were members of the Dantes, arguably the most popular local band in Columbus at the time. The Dantes served as the warmup act for Hendrix that night, March 3, 1968, at Vets Memorial Auditorium on West Broad Street, just across the Scioto River from City Hall.

    Wehr, now 71 and living in Delaware County as a retired T. Marzetti Co. executive, thinks he watched the flamboyant rock guitarist from the side of the stage. “I don’t even remember what he played,” says Wehr. “I remember there was a cover or two. I believe he did ‘Hang On Sloopy.’ ”

    Hayden says he couldn’t even see Hendrix. “I was stage left, between the second or third curtain,” says Hayden, now 70 and retired in Powell after arranging guided tours of the Ohio Statehouse for nearly 20 years. “I had a straight-on shot of Mitch Mitchell’s kick-drum foot. It was the fastest kick-drum foot I’d ever seen,” Hayden says of the Jimi Hendrix Experience’s drummer. “I watched that all night and couldn’t believe how he did it.”

    But before the show and after—that they both remember.

    Before the show, all the bands on the bill—including Soft Machine, progenitors of England’s prog-rock scene, and Four O’Clock Balloon, another local Columbus favorite—shared the same dressing room. Hayden, the Dantes’ boyish, blond heartthrob of a lead singer, remembers that he wore a silk scarf around his neck that night. When Hendrix entered the dressing room, he, too, was wearing a scarf. “But it was tied differently,” Hayden says. “I kept looking at it, trying to figure it out. I finally went over to him and asked him about it. He says, ‘You’re tying it like an American ties it.’ I did the crossover thing, like a necktie. He says, ‘Let me show you how the British tie it.’ And he showed me. And I tied it like Jimi forever after that. What the hell? If Jimi Hendrix says this is the way you’re supposed to do it, that’s the way you do it. It’s not open debate.”

    After the scarf-tying lesson, Wehr, the Dantes’ rhythm guitarist, remembers, “Barry said, ‘Hey, we’re having a party afterward. Would you guys like to come?’ Mitch Mitchell and [Hendrix bass player] Noel Redding immediately said, ‘No.’ But Hendrix said, ‘Yes.’ We were like, ‘Wow. OK.’ ”

    After the show, Wehr arranged to pick up Hendrix at the Christopher Inn, the city’s iconic cylindrical hotel on Broad Street, where the Experience was staying, and take him back to the house on Howey Road, a couple of blocks south of Hudson Street, that the Dantes used as a party house and rehearsal space.

    “We get to the Christopher Inn—I think Jack White, the drummer for Four O’Clock Balloon was with me—and it’s late, probably after midnight, and there’s one guy at the desk,” Wehr says. “We told him we were there to pick up Jimi Hendrix. Here we were, a couple of guys in polka-dot pants and long hair. I’m sure we looked like groupies. And the guy at the desk says, ‘He’s not staying here.’ But we were like, ‘Look, we just were on the show with him at Vets, we told him we’d pick him up.’ We must have been convincing enough, because the guy picks up the phone and makes a call. Then he turns around, kind of sheepish like, and tells us, ‘He’ll be right down.’ ”

    “Not five minutes later, the elevator doors open and out steps Hendrix, colorful, flowing clothes, a big hat with a big feather in it, completely dressed the part,” says Wehr.

    Hendrix climbed in the passenger seat of the Dantemobile, a blue Chevy Caprice station wagon with “Dantes” in letters down the side. “We started down High Street, and when we got to campus, students were still out doing their thing,” says Wehr. “Every time we’d stop at a stop light, they’d see the Dantes car, turn and look and see Hendrix sitting in the passenger seat, and start running. The light would change and I’d speed away before they could catch us, until the next light, and the same thing would happen. We were like the Pied Piper, with kids running after us down High Street.”

    The Dantes’ Howey Street house wasn’t much—nothing but a few mattresses thrown on the floor, egg cartons stapled to the walls of the basement to help muffle the sound during rehearsals. “We basically had nothing to offer him,” says Wehr. “We asked what he’d like, and he said he’d enjoy a glass of red wine. We all kind of looked at each other and thought, ‘What do we do now?’ Fortunately, one of the girls there said she lived close and could get a bottle. In short order, she came back with a bottle that she probably took from her parents. We sat around on the floor and talked and drank the bottle.”

    “There were no drugs of any kind, nothing crazy,” Wehr says. “He was really soft-spoken, nice, mild-mannered—nothing like the guitar-burning wild man you’d see on stage. I think we just talked about music. He wasn’t put out. I think he genuinely wanted to be there. It was a scene.”

    “After about an hour or so, he says, ‘Hey, I’ve really enjoyed being with you guys but have to get up early,’ ” Wehr says. “I think he had a gig in New York the next day. So we got in the car and I drove him back to the Christopher Inn.”

    Both Wehr and Hayden say there was no idol worship—no photos, no autographs. They weren’t starry-eyed teens. They were in their early 20s, only a couple of years younger than Hendrix. They’d opened for other big names, had toured the country and had enjoyed their share of success. Their first single, “Can’t Get Enough of Your Love,” had cracked the Billboard Top 40 nationally and had become the No. 1 song in the Columbus market in 1966, pushing ”(You’re My) Soul and Inspiration” by the Righteous Brothers off the mark.

    “I looked at it like we were all peers,” says Hayden. “It was another gig. We were happy about it for sure, because we liked him. But we basically had the same clothes, the same gear.”

    They thought it would last forever. It didn’t. Within two years, Hendrix was dead of an overdose, and the Dantes were done. “I realize now, in later years, it was a big deal. It’s cool. I’m glad I get to talk about it now,” says Hayden. “But I miss it. It’s not the same now as it was. I liked it better then. I feel bad for anybody who didn’t grow up when we did. Being a teenager was just about the best thing you could be. We ruled. To be truthful, if you brought a time machine to my house, I’d set it for 1964 and leave right now.”

    http://www.columbusmonthly.com/news/...ntes-in-linden

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