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Thread: 1969-06-29 'Denver Pop Festival', Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado, USA

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    1969-06-29 'Denver Pop Festival', Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado, USA

    Saturday, June 29th, 1969

    1. Tax Free
    2. Hear My Train A Comin'
    3. Fire
    4. Spanish Castle Magic
    5. Red House
    6. Foxy Lady
    7. Star Spangled Banner
    8. Purple Haze

    8mm Resynced

    Attachment 6182

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    Re: 1969-06-29 'Denver Pop Festival', Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado, USA


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    Re: 1969-06-29 'Denver Pop Festival', Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado, USA

    This show really was incredible.

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    Re: 1969-06-29 'Denver Pop Festival', Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado, USA

    Last edited by billo528; 04-22-16 at 07:13 PM.

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    Re: 1969-06-29 'Denver Pop Festival', Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado, USA

    Quote Originally Posted by edunk View Post
    This show really was incredible.
    Were you there? If so, please share
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: 1969-06-29 'Denver Pop Festival', Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado, USA

    This would be Noel Redding's last gig with Jimi and the end of the original Jimi Hendrix Experience

    Last edited by billo528; 04-26-16 at 08:15 AM.

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    Re: 1969-06-29 'Denver Pop Festival', Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado, USA

    Best AUD version (Whiteflame Stereo Merge): http://crosstowntorrents.org/showthr...r-Stereo-Merge
    Is the microphone on?

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    Re: 1969-06-29 'Denver Pop Festival', Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado, USA

    (for article with pics, see http://retrorebirth.blogspot.nl/2010...7-29-1969.html)


    Denver Pop Festival June 27 - 29, 1969
    Jimi Hendrix Experience, Denver Pop Festival June 27 - 29, 1969

    The Denver Pop Festival was a three-day music festival promoted by rock promoter Barry Fey (Feyline) on June 27-June 29, 1969 which was largely overshadowed by Woodstock two months later. Unlike the free-form happening in upstate New York, the Denver festival had the full support and local resources of a major city, taking place in Denver Mile High Stadium. There were high expectations for the Festival; it was commonly called the "First Annual" Denver Pop Festival. The peak attendance was estimated at 50,000.

    Denver Pop Festival June 27 - 29, 1969

    Denver officials actually cooperated to a remarkable degree with Fey in the latter's preparations for the upcoming three-day festival, which was anticipated to draw a large influx of young people from out-of-town. The city provided a campground at West Sixth Avenue and Federal Boulevard, where the Metro Denver Urban Coalition arranged for water trucks and portable toilets. The campground even ran shuttles to the downtown festival site at Mile High Stadium, home to the Denver Broncos football team.

    Jimi Hendrix Experience, Denver Pop Festival June 27 - 29, 1969

    Sixteen bands were scheduled to play. The Jimi Hendrix Experience would top the bill on the festival's third and final day. More than 10,000 fans were expected each day. Bill Hanley of 'Monterey' and 'Miami Pop' festival fame would take charge of the sound system, while Chip Monck (later of Woodstock fame) would MC the Denver festival. Tickets were priced at $6 per night or $15 for all three nights. Fortunately, Denver's weather cooperated for the outdoor festival. Yet the unprecedented scale of the event, and forces loose in America's streets, seemed to conspire against a smooth operation. As Leslie Gorham Haseman recently put it: "It was peace, love, dove, until '69."



    Alan Cunningham of the Rocky Mountain News wrote that "Denver's 'first annual' Pop Festival blasted off into a three-day orbit of screaming and wildly vibrating animal sounds Friday night before more than 8,000 outlandishly clad and thoroughly delighted young fans."

    Creedence Clearwater Revival

    CCR, Credence Clearwater Revival, Denver Pop Festival June 27 - 29, 1969

    Just how thoroughly delighted were the young fans?

    "A 19-year-old Denver youth sitting in the stands got so carried away with it all that he stripped to near-nothingness. As the crowd cheered his emancipation, two unsmiling police officers cut his evening short by escorting him outside. Police.. .said he was later charged with indecent exposure [and] said he told them he had 'just conquered the world' by taking his clothes off."

    Zephyr, Denver Pop Festival June 27 - 29, 1969

    Reported Jim Fouratt in Rolling Stone: "Outside, however, the one petty incident needed to rile the protectors happened: A flying bottle hit a cop's helmet; a chase resulted in the arrest of a zonked-out black dressed in an orange jump suit; sirens blared while the P.A. system played 'Street Fighting Man' on stage, and the scene was set for Saturday."

    Zephyr onstage at the Denver Pop Festival June 1969

    Zephyr, Denver Pop Festival June 27 - 29, 1969

    Herbie Worthington: "I don't remember what we did that afternoon; we'd just hang out and talk... I was down the hotel lobby and these girls walked up to me, out of nowhere, and they just said, 'Could you introduce us to Jimi Hendrix?' And I said, 'No. I don't know him.' I went back to Jimi's room and I said, 'Jimi, there's these girls down there that were asking about you.' And he said, 'Where are they?' And I said, 'I told them I don't know you.' Jimi went like: 'Oh man!'"
    In the meantime, far more serious matters were about to unfold. Noel Redding remembered in his book Are You Experienced? that someone asked him in Denver if he was still with the band -"It did my head in. I was uneasy enough about our future, but this rumor just blew me away".

    Noel Redding playing live at the Denver Pop Festival 1969

    Noel Redding, Denver Pop Festival June 27 - 29, 1969, Jimi Hendrix

    Noel Redding, Denver Pop Festival June 27 - 29, 1969

    Frank Zappa is credited by some with inventing the audience wave during his set. He actually selected sections of the stadium (audience) to each make different odd sounds and gestures. He then composed a "tune" on his "crowd instrument".

    Frank Zappa, Mothers, Denver Pop Festival June 27 - 29, 1969

    Throughout much of the festival, a crowd gathered outside the venue and demonstrated against having to pay to hear the acts. They also tried to breach the gates and security fences. The Denver Police were forced to employ riot tactics to protect the gates.

    On the second day the battle between gatecrashers outside the stadium and the police suddenly affected those inside. With a combination of shifting wind and re-thrown canisters, tear gas suddenly swept over the crowd. The seats emptied into the concourses and onto the field.

    Frank Zappa, Mothers, Denver Pop Festival June 27 - 29, 1969

    Ticket prices were $6 per day, or $15 for all three days (Fri, Sat, Sun). On Sunday, after all possible tickets had been sold, the promoter announced from the stage that he was declaring it a "free festival".



    Performers At The Denver Pop Festival June 27-29 1969

    June 27

    * Big Mama Thornton
    * The Flock
    * Three Dog Night
    * Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention
    * Iron Butterfly

    June 28

    * Aeorta
    * Zephyr (with Tommy Bolin)
    * Poco
    * Johnny Winter
    * Tim Buckley
    * Creedence Clearwater Revival

    June 29

    * Aum
    * Zephyr
    * Rev. Cleophus Robinson
    * Joe Cocker
    * Three Dog Night
    * The Jimi Hendrix Experience (final performance together)

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    Re: 1969-06-29 'Denver Pop Festival', Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado, USA

    Twenty fabled moments in Denver music, #8: The Jimi Hendrix Experience's last show

    A A

    By Westword
    Tuesday, November 27, 2012 | 3 years ago

    1




    Over the next few weeks, Backbeat will finish our countdown of the twenty most fabled moments in Denver music history. Today, we take a look back at Barry Fey's Denver Pop Festival, a three-night musical event in June 1969 that culminated with the final appearance of the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the outfit led by the legendary guitarist, who would have been seventy years old today.


    By Mark Sanders and Dave Herrera
    The mere fact that the Jimi Hendrix Experience played in Denver is itself remarkable -- even more so when you take note of the fact that the band essentially broke up at Mile High Stadium, just after playing the Denver Pop Festival on Sunday, June 29, 1969. There was also clash between the crowd and the police that involved tear gas at the three-night festival, which was a landmark event for then burgeoning promoter Barry Fey, who was only doing one show a month at the time.
    See also: - #9: Pantera fans riot at Mammoth Event Center, 1997 - #10: Nirvana's first post-Nevermind show here, 1991 - #11: Bob Dylan crashed in the Mile High City, 1960 - Twenty Fabled moments archive - The Jimi Hendrix Experience's Are You Experienced turns 45 - Top Five Excellent Jimi Hendrix Songs You Might Not Know - Jimi Hendrix's 70th Birthday: Thirteen revealing quotes from the man himself - Hendrix at 70: Jimi was headed for jazz fusion and hip-hop, not Earth, Wind & Fire
    The festival, which drew a crowd of 62,000 at Mile High Stadium over three nights, featured seventeen acts, among them, Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention, Three Dog Night, Poco, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Joe Cocker, Tim Buckley and the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Astonishingly, you could see all of those acts for a mere six dollars per night or fifteen dollars for all three nights. Pulling it together was a monumental task for Fey and company, and at one point the whole thing even appeared to be in peril because of the elements.
    "Starting in May, we had a godawful rainy season, the worst I'd ever seen," Fey recalls. "If I remember, someone died on Alameda -- west Alameda, in the gutter -- there was so much rain. It rained and poured and poured, and when I got up Friday morning, the radio said there was a zero percent today, a zero percent tomorrow and five percent on Sunday. And Monday it poured. That could've been the shortest career. I would've been out of business."
    Indeed. There was quite a bit of money on the line, according to Fey, who says his initial budget was a hundred-thousand dollars but soon ballooned to three-hundred thousand. "We borrowed on everything we had, cars, and everybody that worked for me borrowed," he remembers. "We ended up doing two-hundred and sixty thousand. Hendrix alone was fifty grand. Things just got way out of hand."
    While there were a bunch of stellar acts that night, the Jimi Hendrix Experience was probably the most noteworthy. The legendary guitarist and his British bandmates, bassist Noel Redding and drummer Mitch Mitchell, made for an odd combo -- a wise-talking kid from Seattle who played the hell out of an electric guitar and two skinny Brits with funny haircuts backing him. The "power trio" setup was still rather unique at the time, as was Hendrix's wah-wah-inflected fretwork and his mix of sex-heavy lyrics and New Age mysticism. The band formed in 1966 but was not introduced to American audiences until the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, a landmark rock event that also put the Who, Janis Joplin and Otis Redding in front of the largest American crowds they'd seen to date.
    By the time the Experience showed up in Denver, they had been touring and recording nonstop for three years. The Sunday, June 29 show at Mile High was the last of the band's American tour, and feelings were raw. Add to this the mounting tension between the supposed gate-crashers (supposed, because it turns out the rabblerousers weren't actually interested in seeing the show -- more on that in a minute) and the police who resorted to employing tear gas in an effort to control the crowd.
    "I had seen tear gas before in the Marine Corps," says Fey, recalling the clash on the night before Hendrix's performance on Sunday evening. "Zephyr was on stage Saturday. All of the sudden, people started coming... See we were lined up on - the stage was on the first base line facing West. And people started coming on the field with their eyes, and then I smelled it. I was inside. I didn't know what was going on outside. So Chip [Monck, who served as emcee at Woodstock a few months later] and I took a turn at the mike saying, 'Please do not rub your eyes. Get something wet and put it on your eyes.' And we pretty well had it - not under control, but it was sporadic firing all Saturday night."
    In response to Saturday's commotion, Fey met with police officials, including the then Chief -- who coincidently happened to be the uncle of Bill Thompson, manager of the Airplane -- to try and formulate a plan for keeping the peace the next night.
    "I said, 'Listen, we've already got enough tickets sold. I don't want any trouble," says Fey, recalling the solution he proposed. "Tomorrow night at six o'clock when the music starts, you open the doors, let everybody in.' I assumed it was gate-crashers against the police. They said, 'Okay.' The chief was there, and he said, 'Okay, we'll do it.' So Sunday, Leslie and I get there about 4:30 and Stan Kayou [the officer in charge] comes up to me and says, 'We're not going to let these fucking punks push us around. We're going to make a stand.' After we agreed to open the doors, they changed their minds, and you can't fight the police.

    "Leslie and I came up with an idea About five thirty, the lines were already forming outside [with] cops, kids," Fey continues. "We went out with literally thousands of tickets, and Leslie had the same experience I did. Went up to a kid, 'Here, take a ticket. Go on in.' [He said], 'We don't want a fucking ticket!' I said, 'Beg your pardon?' He said, 'We don't want to see the show. We came to fight the pig.' They were all from California. And so as soon as the music started on Sunday, all the gas and kids up on the third deck throwing rocks down on the cops. I remember Joe Cocker was in the north bathroom in the fetal position. He was scared to death. 'Is this what America's all about?' I explained, 'No, we'll be alright.' I just couldn't wait for it to be over. I was miserable -- as well as we were doing and the beautiful music, I hated it.
    "There's a lot of stories, but the worst one is Hendrix," Fey goes on. "I had Jimi September 1, 1968 at Red Rocks. We had become such good friends in a year or so. I mean, I just loved him. He was such a great guy. And then nine months later at the Denver Pop Festival, I get to talk to Noel and Mitch, and they said, 'We're not going to play with him anymore, Barry.' I said, 'What are you talking about?' They said, 'We can't stand him. Since you've seen us last, he's discovered heroin, and you can't deal with him.' And then he showed up, and he hardly knew who I was. And that was the last appearance of the Jimi Hendrix Experience, June 29, 1969. First time I ever heard him do the Star Spangled Banner.
    That night, the band played what would later become FM classic rock station staples: "Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)," "Purple Haze" and "Fire," plus a pre-Woodstock rendition of "A Star Spangled Banner," and the crowd went wild. After the Denver show, Redding headed back to London and Hendrix ended up hiring a revolving cast of musicians to back him. Two percussionists, two drummers, a new bassist and second guitarist would be with Hendrix at his famed Woodstock performance. The band lineups would continue changing over the next few months, with Hendrix's behavior becoming increasingly erratic, despite playing very high-profile gigs.
    There were rumors of the Experience regrouping, then those were deemed false. There was recording, but the album (First Rays of the New Rising Sun) languished and went unfinished. There was a tour, but it was also a rough-going affair, with canceled gigs and bassist Cox abandoning the band entirely. By the end of September, 1970 -- barely a year after playing Denver -- Hendrix was found dead in a London apartment at the age of 27.

    http://www.westword.com/music/twenty...t-show-5685155

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    Smile Re: 1969-06-29 'Denver Pop Festival', Mile High Stadium, Denver, Colorado, USA

    Sunday 29 June 1969
    Denver, Mile High Stadium, CO. JHE
    Concert - Denver Pop Festival [third day] –at 22:30
    The final official concert by the original Jimi Hendrix Experience, as later that night Noel decides to leave The Experience.
    Mitch: “Noel only played one more gig with us after Newport Pop, at the Mile High Stadium in Denver, at the end of June. I've read various things suggesting that Noel got very emotional about a reporter who said to him, ‘What are you doing here? I thought you'd left?' That kind of deal. Maybe so, maybe not.
    I do remember we attended a press conference in the afternoon and that was probably where Noel was approached essentially with the information that the band might be expanding. Well, this was no big news. I can't speak for Noel, but we'd often discussed the possibilities of bringing in a horn section or whatever. Just thinking about what might work. If anything didn't work, fine — forget it. I really don't remember any animosity at the time, certainly not that afternoon.”
    Noel: “The next day, every*thing was going fine until somebody said to me, 'Are you still with the band? I heard Hendrix replaced you!' Seems some eager press person had reported that I had split because I hadn't been consulted about the 'expansion' of the band, whatever that was supposed to mean. This was the last straw. It did my head in. I was uneasy enough about our future, but this rumour just blew me away.”
    Film: 2 minutes silent 8mm colour (Purple Haze).
    Attended by: Herbie Worthington and James “Vishwa[murti]” Scott
    Support: Aum: Rev. Cleophus Robinson; Three Dog Night; Joe Cocker; possibly another act.
    Promoter: Feyline Productions
    Audience: ~ 17,000

    Songs:

    Tax Free (15) (Bo Hansson & Janne Carlsson)
    Getting My Heart Back Together Again (31)
    Fire (64)
    Spanish Castle Magic (38)
    Red House (60)
    Foxy Lady (72)
    The Star Spangled Banner (26) (music: John Stafford Smith)
    Purple Haze (81i) [partly filmed]
    It has been claimed that Jimi finished with Voodoo Child (s.r.)?

    Mitch: “Anyway, we did the gig, very good crowd. It seems, though, that the powers that be decided to use the place for a tear-gas experiment and an exercise in crowd control. They claimed that the crowd was getting out of control — absolute bull. OK, so a few people ran up to the front of the stage, but we're not talking serious lunacy here. Suddenly from the surrounding hills they let the tear-gas off and people started to panic.
    We were virtually finishing our set when it happened, and we were ushered off-stage through the tear-gas. Gerry Stickells suddenly, not for the first time, had a heavy situation to deal with. He found us a U-Haul Rent-A-Truck, one of those two-ton jobs, with aluminium sides and top. The band got into the back, this huge cavernous space. We only had to drive about a quarter of a mile back to the hotel, but suddenly we were very scared. To avoid the tear-gas, people started climbing on to the roof, which started to cave in, and we thought it was just a matter of moments before we were going to be crushed.
    It took us nearly an hour to get back and we all linked arms and shook hands, feeling that if we were going to go, we'd go together. We really still felt like a band, absolutely no animosity.”

    "Noel: “The police panicked when 30,000 people to get on the stage and started firing teargas into the crowd. Unfortunately, the wind was blowing the wrong way and the gas started floating towards the stage. Gerry came through and saved the day. He rescued us by backing a huge panel van right up the stage. We dashed inside and he locked us in. The crowd immediately swarmed over the van - like ants or bees - the roof began to buckle under the weight. Gerry just moved the van out. It was 1/2 mile to the hotel and when he arrived there were still people on top of the van and hanging on the sides.”

    “As if the rumours were not enough, the concert very nearly killed us. These big shows were just too scary. We went down fantastically well - too well. The crowd went berserk. Thirty [sic] thousand fans wanted to be on stage with us. The police panicked, and I don’t blame them, when the crowd started to move en masse towards us. We didn't feel too calm about it either, but kept playing, hoping it would ease up. The police had tear gas, so they used it but forgot to check the wind direction first. Of course it was blowing towards the stage. Tear gas is wicked. We started to choke and feel the burning tears, but there was no way off the stage, which was now completely encircled by a solid mass of surging bodies. If we had jumped or fallen into the crowd we would have been mauled. Gerry came through for us, and I believe
    saved our lives. He backed a huge panel van right up to the stage and we stumbled blindly, choking, inside. He locked us in. The crowd immediately swarmed over the van, and the din inside was frightening as the roof began to buckle under the weight of coundess bodies. We huddled in silence, each lost in private thoughts and prayers, fighting in our own personal ways to stay calm in the dark, windowless van, with the roof creaking closer to us and the door locked. How could this nightmare have emerged out of all the good feelings and music? As calmly as I could I concentrated on rolling a joint. Thank heavens I had my stash. I always said that grass made it easier to relax. Well hell, this was the test. I truly appreciated that smoke, which seemed set to be my last. Then the engine started. Gerry had somehow made it back to the driver's seat. He couldn't wait for the way to clear and just eased the van into motion and hoped for the best. It was a good mile back to the hotel. There were still fans hanging on to the top and sides of the van when we arrived. We had to run for our lives to get through the hotel door [just a tad of hyperbole? Ed.]. To this day, I get a horrible feeling in the pit of my stomach when I think about it.”

    “From some reason, I jumped to the conclusion that Jimi had actually done an interview saying I'd been replaced [he had. Ed.], and it hurt. I suddenly just wanted to get away, to be alone, to recover. We'd already agreed to do a revival tour in 1970 [a spring tour in 1970 could only have been talked about, there was no formal agreement, it was only June! There was another eight months to go until then. So, if they had talked about a ‘revival’ tour, that implies that it was accepted that the group as it was, was over – as Jimi had said in late 1968 – and this had been a ‘farewell’ tour, at least until ‘Spring revival’? Ed.] That was OK, as it was months away.”

    “I fled for England the next day. It was the end of the world as I'd known it for three hectic years. For the first time in ten years I stopped keeping up my diary. That was the last show The Jimi Hendrix Experience ever played [with me. Ed.].

    Mitch: “Either way Noel did fly back to England the next day and announced that he'd left the band.”

    Herbie Worthington [must have been tripping, or something]: “They played ‘Bold As Love’.”

    Barry Fey: "Starting in May, we had a godawful rainy season, the worst I'd ever seen. If I remember, someone died on Alameda — west Alameda, in the gutter — there was so much rain. It rained and poured and poured, and when I got up Friday morning, the radio said there was a zero percent today, a zero percent tomorrow and five percent on Sunday. And Monday it poured. That could've been the shortest career. I would've been out of business. [My initial budget was a hundred-thousand dollars but soon ballooned to three-hundred thousand.] We borrowed on everything we had, cars, and everybody that worked for me borrowed. We ended up doing two-hundred and sixty thousand. Hendrix alone was fifty grand. Things just got way out of hand.
    I had seen tear gas before in the Marine Corps. Zephyr was on stage Saturday. All of the sudden, people started coming... See we were lined up on - the stage was on the first base line facing West. And people started coming on the field with their eyes, and then I smelled it. I was inside. I didn't know what was going on outside. So Chip [Monck] and I took a turn at the mike saying, 'Please do not rub your eyes. Get something wet and put it on your eyes.' And we pretty well had it - not under control, but it was sporadic firing all Saturday night.
    [I met with police officials, including the then Chief [coincidently the uncle of Bill Thompson, manager of the Airplane. Ed.]. I said, 'Listen, we've already got enough tickets sold. I don't want any trouble. Tomorrow night at six o'clock when the music starts, you open the doors, let everybody in.' I assumed it was gate-crashers against the police. They said, 'Okay.' The chief was there, and he said, 'Okay, we'll do it.' So Sunday, Leslie and I get there about 4:30 and Stan Kayou [the officer in charge] comes up to me and says, 'We're not going to let these fucking punks push us around. We're going to make a stand.' After we agreed to open the doors, they changed their minds, and you can't fight the police.
    Leslie and I came up with an idea about five thirty, the lines were already forming outside [with] cops, kids. We went out with literally thousands of tickets, and Leslie had the same experience I did. Went up to a kid, 'Here, take a ticket. Go on in.' [He said], 'We don't want a fucking ticket!' I said, 'Beg your pardon?' He said, 'We don't want to see the show. We came to fight the pig.' They were all from California. And so as soon as the music started on Sunday, all the gas and kids up on the third deck throwing rocks down on the cops. I remember Joe Cocker was in the north bathroom in the fetal position. He was scared to death. 'Is this what America's all about?' I explained, 'No, we'll be alright.' I just couldn't wait for it to be over. I was miserable — as well as we were doing and the beautiful music, I hated it.
    There's a lot of stories, but the worst one is Hendrix. I had Jimi September 1, 1968 at Red Rocks. We had become such good friends in a year or so. I mean, I just loved him. He was such a great guy. And then nine months later at the Denver Pop Festival, I get to talk to Noel and Mitch, and they said, 'We're not going to play with him anymore, Barry.' I said, 'What are you talking about?' They said, 'We can't stand him. Since you've seen us last, he's discovered heroin, and you can't deal with him.' And then he showed up, and he hardly knew who I was. And that was the last appearance of the Jimi Hendrix Experience, June 29, 1969. First time I ever heard him do the Star Spangled Banner.”

    "We were very, very close. From the time I had him at Red Rocks, Sept. 2, '68, to June '69, he hardly knew who I was. He was starting to do heroin and Mitch and Noel were really fed up. That was the last appearance of The Experience."

    Ann Arbor Argus (29 July) review by unknown: “Roughly 2,000 kids remained outside, unwilling to pay $6 to hear the music that sprang from them and, of course, was rightfully theirs. They sat on a grassy knoll at the south end of the Mile High Stadium, taking in the jams, until the Denver cops ordered the sprinklers turned on. The kids, most of them not older than 17 and all of them beautifully militant, began to throw rocks and bottles at the cops inside, manning the south gate. Out came the gas, and fortunately it was only CS. But the cops had apparently not read the brochures with the gas canisters because they managed to gas the upper row of seats and almost all the concession girls inside bit the dust. A few of the guerillas outside went down, but very few. And so it went on for another two hours. On Sunday everyone did the same number again. On went the sprinklers, out came the gas and down went the concession girls. Tear gas is fickle and answers to the winds which blew inside the stadium in greater quantities than Saturday. Only Hendrix was left and we wondered if we were going to see the gods-at-play or a flesh-and-blood musician. An electricity in the air had nothing to do with music, but portended a riot. Hendrix squelched it. By being a bitter old man. ‘We saw some tear gas. That’s a sign of the third world war. Just make sure you pick your side now,’ he said wryly. Then he announced the impending break up of the Experience. Super-drummer Mitch Mitchell and bassist Noel Redding were planning to form their own groups. But what Hendrix sang toted up the mood of Denver pop - dollar signs as God: ‘Gonna be a voodoo chile: Gonna go on the road: Gonna make a lot of money, and buy this town. Gonna buy this town and put it all in my shoe.’”

    Denver Post (30 June) [front page headlines] ‘Policemen remove a youth from gas-shrouded south end of Mile High Stadium during early moments of disturbance Sunday, A two hour melee between police and potential gate crashers of the rock music concert ended when the shows managers let the crashers in free’ [photo caption], ‘THRONG TEAR-GASSED’, Festival Flap: 33 Arrested, 6 Hurt’ report by Richard O’Reilly: ”A second night of violence at the Denver Pop Festival at Mile High Stadium Sunday resulted in thousands being tear gassed, 33 arrests and 6 treated for minor injuries at Denver General Hospital.The two hour melee….potential gate crashers at the rock show concert ended only after the shows managers agreed to open the stadium. A similar disturbance erupted…day night at the…the opening night of the…”

    Rumour has it that Jimi later mailed a cable message to the Denver police stating “Make Love, not war - Jimi Hendrix.” ['rumour' ie pish. Ed.]

    Denver Post (30 June) ‘Ruckus Outside Mars Music Inside Stadium’ – review by James Pagliasotti: “The final two nights of the Denver Pop Festival were in marked contrast to the calmness of the opening night. While a lot of good music was being laid down inside Mile High Stadium, roving bands of potential gate-crashers clashed with police outside the stadium’s south fence. Sunday night’s event saw a 2 1/2-hour battle between the police and potential gate-crashers drain much of the pleasure from the fans gathered inside Mile High Stadium. The crowd inside for the most part was well-mannered and orderly but distracted by the continual booming of tear gas cannisters and firecrackers which began shortly after a trio from San Francisco, Aum, finished a groovy opening set. The clouds of gas rose just beyond the south fence throughout performances by the Rev. Cleophus Robinson, Zephyr, and 3 Dog Night. Consequently, the audience’s attention was distracted. To say the performers bombed would be unfair, but they certainly didn’t carry the evening. The gates were finally opened to the approximately 400 people outside the stadium, and a semblance of calm was restored. The spirit of the crowd was somewhat deflated though, and a fine set by England’s Joe Cocker was only mildly received. The long-awaited Jimi Hendrix Experience put the cap on the weekend with one of their usual out-of-sight performances. Hendrix gets more sounds out of a guitar than can be imagined, and puts them all together in a form that owes more to jazz than to rock. His sidemen, Noel Redding on bass and Mitch Mitchell on drums, jam in a kind of perpetual free form accompaniment, providing as a trio what many consider to be the best group in rock music today. The final song brought the audience out onto the field, some dancing joyously, others content just to be near the Experience. Then, with feedback still droning through the amplifiers, the group ducked behind the curtains and the first Denver Festival came to an end. It was, despite outside disruptions, an outstanding show in every respect. It was well-organized, the sound was excellent, the audience was groovy, and the performers superb. Here’s hoping more of the same will follow in coming years.”

    Michael Stelk: “I spoke with someone who sat behind Terry Hanley’s board and they’re convinced that he was recording the show and pointed to the use of two [professional] tape decks during the show. It’s still a mystery to me.”

    ‘Pavlovscat’: “...I saw Hendrix again at the ‘Mile High Pop Festival’ in the summer of '69 at the old Mile High Stadium.... People were breaking down part of the fence and trying to crash the concert because some people in those days had the weird idea that all music festivals should be free. The cops responded by tear-gassing them,the tear-gas then wafted out over the crowd causing most of them to start rioting. The inside of my nose was scabbed over for a month! Those were the days!”

    30 No gig, Jimi flew back home to New York City
    Noel flew back home to London.
    Mitch? He flew home to London too, if not that day sometime very soon after.

    Billy: “And-uh then finally he had finalised most of the obligations he had with the Experience.”
    JULY
    01 Boiceville, “Ashokan House”, NY.
    Jimi moved into this large country retreat in the Catskills.
    Last edited by stplsd; 09-17-17 at 11:25 AM.
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Wow ex excellant quality.

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