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Thread: 1967-06-04 The Saville Theater, London, England

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    1967-06-04 The Saville Theater, London, England

    Sunday, June 4th, 1967
    The Saville Theater, London, England
    with Procol Harum, Stormsville Shakers, The Chiffons, and Denny Laine & his Electric String Band


    NO SETLIST KNOWN
    no recording has surfaced


    Setlist included these songs according to journalists...

    (???). Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band
    (???). Like A Rolling Stone
    (???). Are You Experienced?
    (???). Purple Haze
    (???). Hey Joe
    (???). The Wind Cries Mary
    (???). Foxy Lady
    (???). Manic Depression
    Last edited by Dolly Dagger; 08-25-11 at 06:50 AM.

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    Re: 1967-06-04 The Saville Theater, London, England

    Last edited by billo528; 03-23-16 at 12:52 PM.

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    Re: 1967-06-04 The Saville Theater, London, England

    6/4/67, 2nd show THE SAVILLE THEATRE, LONDON

    Sgt. Pepper
    Foxy Lady
    Like a Rolling Stone
    Manic Depression
    Hey Joe
    Purple Haze
    The Wind Cries Mary
    Are You Experienced

    http://home.earthlink.net/~ldouglasbell/dir1/jhe_sets.htm

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    Re: 1967-06-04 The Saville Theater, London, England

    I am not sure if there is a direct connection but Paul McCartney was in the audience that night (http://www.beatlelinks.net/forums/sh...ad.php?t=40972), and it was Paul who recommended Hendrix to the Monterey festival two weeks later.

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    Re: 1967-06-04 The Saville Theater, London, England

    There were 2 shows on this night.

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    Re: 1967-06-04 The Saville Theater, London, England


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    Re: 1967-06-04 The Saville Theater, London, England

    Last edited by Luigi; 11-01-12 at 01:34 PM.

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    Re: 1967-06-04 The Saville Theater, London, England


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    Re: 1967-06-04 The Saville Theater, London, England

    According to recent doc, "here MY Train A Comin", you are correct, Paul talks about it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ezy Rider View Post
    I am not sure if there is a direct connection but Paul McCartney was in the audience that night (http://www.beatlelinks.net/forums/sh...ad.php?t=40972), and it was Paul who recommended Hendrix to the Monterey festival two weeks later.

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    Re: 1967-06-04 The Saville Theater, London, England

    McCartney and Harrison watch Jimi Hendrix in London
    Sunday 4 June 1967Live 2 Comments

    Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr had first seen The Jimi Hendrix Experience performing on 11 January 1967 at the Bag O'Nails club in London. On this day McCartney, George Harrison, Jane Asher and Pattie Boyd watched them headline a bill at the city's Saville Theatre.

    The bill also included Denny Laine & His Electric String Band, The Chiffons and Procol Harum. Hendrix opened his set with a version of the title track from The Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band album, which had been released just three days before.

    It would be one of his first gigs in London. Jimi was a sweetie, a very nice guy. I remember him opening at the Saville on a Sunday night, 4 June 1967. Brian Epstein used to rent it when it was usually dark on the Sunday. Jimi opened, the curtains flew back and he came walking forward, playing 'Sgt. Pepper', and it had only been released on the Thursday so that was like the ultimate compliment. It's still obviously a shining memory for me, because I admired him so much anyway, he was so accomplished. To think that that album had meant so much to him as to actually do it by the Sunday night, three days after the release. He must have been so into it, because normally it might take a day for rehearsal and then you might wonder whether you'd put it in, but he just opened with it. It's a pretty major compliment in anyone's book. I put that down as one of the great honours of my career. I mean, I'm sure he wouldn't have thought of it as an honour, I'm sure he thought it was the other way round, but to me that was like a great boost.

    Paul McCartney
    Many Years From Now, Barry Miles

    http://www.beatlesbible.com/1967/06/...endrix-london/

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    Re: 1967-06-04 The Saville Theater, London, England

    Sunday 04 June 1967
    London W1, Saville Theatre, 135-149 Shaftesbury Ave, Soho, England. JHE
    Rehearsal.
    #1 Backstage; arrival?: The ‘eyeballs’ jacket; new floral print shirt; red & pink neckerchief; the black iron cross; gem ring; white trousers w’ neckerchief? & medal belt.
    #2 Backstage & 1st show: Dark (black?) crushed velvet jacket w’ shiny (silver?) buttons & art brooch; no shirt; navel love heart paint; floral neckerchief; the black iron cross; white? trousers w’ neckerchief & medal belt plus a filigree belt; new black strat w’ ‘cowboy 3’ strap.
    #3 Backstage: The ‘eyeballs’ jacket; the ‘Gypsy’ waistcoat; no shirt; pattern neckerchief; white? trousers w’ neckerchief & medal belt plus a filigree belt.
    #4 Show: The ‘eyeballs’ jacket; the ‘Gypsy’ waistcoat; white lace shirt; (orange/purple blobs?) neckerchief; the black iron cross; 3 rings; the orange velvet [suit?] trousers w’ neckerchief & medal (and filigree?) belt/s new black strat w’ ‘cowboy 3’ strap; (changes to painted up old candy-apple for ‘sacrifice’).
    Two shows at 18:00 and 20:30
    Hendrix brought his damaged cherry red strat, that he had painted, which he “sacrificed” at the end.
    Film?: 8mm colour [details unknown]
    Photo’s by Fiona Adams for Fabulous 208
    Support: Stormsville Shakers: Procul Harum; The Chiffons; Denny Laine’s Electric String Band
    Program: Colourful psyche art by Marijke Koger of ‘The Fool’
    Attended by Peter Asher, Spencer Davis, Donovan, Brian Jones, George Harrison with Patti Boyd, Mick Jagger with Marianne Faithful, Eddie Kramer, Paul McCartney with Jane Asher, Graham Nash, Chris Stamp, Charlie Watts, The Troggs, The Turtles a.o.
    Audience: sold out
    Songs 1st show: unknown

    Songs 2nd show:

    Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (Lennon & McCartney)
    Foxy Lady
    Like A Rolling Stone (Bob Dylan)
    Manic Depression
    Hey Joe (Billy Roberts)
    Purple Haze
    The Wind Cries Mary
    Are You Experienced (Jimi smashed up his guitar at the end)

    Noel: “The ‘farewell’ show at the Saville is bound to be a biggy. We even rehearse for it and do a special photo session... Despite amplifier trouble with our new gear, we went down very, very well. Hundreds were turned away from the door...”

    "We were invited to a party at Epstein's place afterwards. I drove all the guys over in my car, parked...and McCartney opened the door! 'Hey-come-in-Jim-Mitch - it-was-a-really-great-show.' The Who were there. Ringo Starr! We went upstairs and they had a professional joint-roller there as well....
    The show[s] at the Saville really capped things off.
    We got the music together, got the recording together, got the audience together, and now it was time to get America together"

    George Harrison: "Yes, I like Jimi Hendrix. He's such a great fellow. At first I thought the playing-gui-tar-with-my-teeth bit was a gimmick, but even when the guitar's stuck in his mouth he's in control. He's very good and he stands out because there's just some*thing about him, when he's standing up there."

    Tony Bramwell: "Jimi had a very organized show. We even arranged for the legs of the drum rostrum to be weakened so when Jimi whacked them with his gui*tar the whole drum kit collapsed - but he could only do it during the second show as we didn't have time to re*build it between houses."

    Disc and Music Echo (10 June), ‘HENDRIX: impact of a 50-megaton H-BOMB!’ by Hugh Nolan: “A packed Saville Theatre audience erupted on Sunday night as Jimi Hendrix announced that this would be his last gig in Britain ‘for a long, long time’ - and then proceeded to smash a beautifily-painted guitar and hurl the pieces into the clamouring crowd.
    It was the highpoint of Jimi’s meteoric rise to fame in this country - and of a superb night’s exciting sounds at the Saville, with a bill which included current chart-toppers, Procol Harum, and a mind blowing set from ex-Moody Blue Denny Laine and his Electric String Band.
    But it was Jimi’s audience and Jimi‘s night. In all the scenes of wild acclaim with which Jimi Hendrix and his Experience have been greeted since they first Exploded onto our rather tired ears none equalled Sunday’s, when after a raving and tumultuous set the whole audience rose to it’s feet.

    He started his set with a driving version of ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ - a nice tribute from three fine progressive musicians to today’s leaders of progressive sounds.
    Then he blasted out ‘Like A Rolling Stone’, ‘Hey Joe’, ‘Purple Haze’, and ‘The Wind Cries Mary’ - all played with as much force and drive as he’s ever played with before, despite long hold-ups because of trouble with his amplifiers.
    Throughout the whole set Jimi kept up a constant stream of happy talk, achieving a fantastic sense of communication with the star-studded audience, Despite the amplifier hang-up he refused to be flustered, telling the audience [Jimi]: ‘This is our last gig here for a long time so we’re gonna make it nice!’
    Then, to a smashing, ear splitting ‘Are You Experienced’ Jimi was handed a guitar from the wings - a guitar he‘d painted in glorious swirling colours and written a poem on the back dedicated to Britain and it’s audiences - and bathed in a flickering strobe light, crashed the guitar about the stage and hurled what was left of it to eager souvenir-hunters in the audience.
    If he ever returns to Britain or not, Jimi Hendrix can be sure that things will never be the same again here since his Experience hit town with all the impact of a 50 - megaton H-Bomb.”

    Melody Maker (10 June) [review] by Chris Welch: “Jimi Hendrix made a tremendous initial impression, Dressed in brilliantly coloured clothes, Jimi roared into ‘Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’, while Mitch Mitchell’s drums lit up with flushing coloured lights, high on a special rostrum.
    Then came the first of long delays while microphones were fixed, The audience were so keyed-up they didn’t mind that road managers nipped on and off stage attempting running repairs.
    The group soldiered on with ‘Foxy Lady’ and ‘Like A Rolling Stone’, then came a mammoth breakdown when the amps blew and for minutes on end there was no music, Mitch, who had been playing wonderfully well, filled in with a drum solo, while bassist Noel Redding chatted chirpily to the audience.
    After the troubles had been sorted out Jimi remarked: ‘I feel like getting nasty’, - and launched into ‘Manic Depression ‘followed by ‘Hey Joe’, ‘Purple Haze’and ‘The Wind Cries Mary’. Running half an hour over time the group concluded with a freak-out of guitar smashing by strobe light. Bit’s of the guitar were then thrown into the audience for collectors, while Mitch’s drum stand was left in a state of collapse. Own up lads, who needs all that?”
    [However five years later in his book ‘Hendrix’, Chris Welch seemed to have changed his mind about what happened that night. Ed.]:
    “The great days of the Jimi Hendrix Experience were already over in a matter of months. From then on, whenever I saw them a steady decline had set in. Those first gigs at the London discos were tight, explosive and fresh. Later the band became ragged, loose and aimless. They seemed to suffer enormous problems with amplification, and at one Saville Theatre appearance they were completely unable to cope when an amp blew out, There was an agonising wait while it was being repaired, and then Mitch’s drums, which were miked up, were distorted and deafening. Jimi himself wasn’t entirely happy with the performance because of the problems with the amps.”

    New Musical Express ‘BAD SHOWS BRING JIM DOWN’ – by Norrie Drummond:
    “Jimi wasn ‘treally in the best of spirits when I met him. The previous evening his concert at London’s Saville Theatre had been plagued with amp problems and it was still worrying him, [Jimi] ‘Man, it really brings me down when these amps don’t work,’ he said, lighting his first cigarette of the day, “and they were new ones too.”
    Manager Chandler entered the room bearing cups of coffee. “Despite the troubles it was still a great show,’ enthused Chas, ‘but you should have seen them in Sweden.’

    ...BUT HE NEEDN’T HAVE WORRIED ABOUT SUNDAY’S
    Three entirely new forms of British pop music were brought together on Sunday evening for one of the most exciting shows to be staged at London’s Savillie Theatre. Three first-rate acts - all of them attempting something new, all of them original and very interesting.
    The Jimi Hendrix Experience - raucous, earthy and brilliant,’ the Procol Harum - Britain’s most talked about group at the moment - and the first major appearance of Denny Laine with his Electric String Band.
    Both performances, not surprisingly, were completely sold out.
    Hendrix - despite amplifier trouble - was as dynamic as ever. If anything his act was better than usual, He worked harder to compensate for the hang-ups, closing with a vicious and extraordinary smash-up.

    His opening number - a potted version of ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ - amused Paul McCartney, who was siting in Brian Epstein’s box, he continued with ‘Hey Joe’, Foxy Lady ‘Purple Haze’ and a string of other numbers before an explosive finale.

    Chris Stamp: “Hendrix had this instinctive sort of magic in that he could suddenly play the right music at absolutely the right time. This hip, London, big-time, show your self audience was wondering, ‘Who is this black guy?”

    Paul McCartney: “Simply incredible, perhaps the best I had ever seen him play.”

    “My only disappointment is that the show, wasn’t professionally recorded.”

    "A highly memorable moment for me - one of the musical highlights - was after we'd released Sgt. Pepper on the Friday. Jimi played the Savile Theatre on the Sunday, and he opened with 'Sgt. Pepper'! He must have listened to it all night....
    You know, in that Dylan-y, Hendrix-y voice, and then he proceeded to do a 20-minute [sic] solo on it, which was just fantastic. I was just: how honoured am I?"

    “Jimi was a sweetie, a very nice guy. I remember him opening at the Saville on a Sunday night. Brian Epstein used to rent it when it was usually dark on the Sunday. Jimi opened, the curtains flew back and he came walking forward, playing 'Sgt. Pepper', and it had only been released on the Thursday so that was like the ultimate compliment. It's still obviously a shining memory for me, because I admired him so much anyway, he was so accomplished. To think that that album had meant so much to him as to actually do it by the Sunday night, three days after the release. He must have been so into it, because normally it might take a day for rehearsal and then you might wonder whether you'd put it in, but he just opened with it. It's a pretty major compliment in anyone's book. I put that down as one of the great honours of my career. I mean, I'm sure he wouldn't have thought of it as an honour, I'm sure he thought it was the other way round, but to me that was like a great boost.”

    Noel: “We'd only learned the song in the dressing room...."

    Graham Nash: “Hendrix came out in this flame orange velvet suit [that was Ipswich. Ed.] playing ‘Sgt. Pepper’ and we were just blown away.”

    "Oh, no, no, I would never play gui*tar with Jimi [laughs]. But I hung out with him. I used to share an apartment in London with Mitch Mitchell, and I got to hang with Jimi a lot. By the way, nobody could ever beat Jimi Hendrix at Risk. No one. Nobody ever. He would drop acid and play Risk, and he was still unbeatable. He was very different from his image. He was a very serious cat - very humble, but very serious."
    [Autumn 2012 by Joe Bosso]

    Keith Reid [Procul Harum]: "He blew out the sound system. This was his first number! So they fixed it and then he went and did the same thing again."

    Tony Visconti [producer]: “One of the greatest experiences I had in the short time since arriving in London was to write five string arrangements for Denny Laine and then have them played on the stage of the Shaftsbury Theatre at a rock show. Jimi Hendrix was also on that bill and Denny Cordell grabbed me backstage saying, 'Visconti, come, you must see this.' Hendrix poured lighter fluid on his Stratocaster and threw a lighted match on it—so that's why two members of the Fire Brigade were standing in the wings, one with an axe in his hands and the other with a fire extinguisher. [NB Jimi didn’t set fire to it he just smashed it up] The audience went berserk and I was just horrified. It would take me years to save up for a Stratocaster.
    After Denny's set, which was very well received, Tony Hall came on stage and asked me to come out from the wings to take a bow as the arranger. I wasn't expecting this at all. I was introduced as a young, up-and-coming record producer from New York City and he told them that they'd be hearing lots of good things about me very soon. It's a good thing I was only told afterwards that the Beatles and the Stones were in the audience as I might have embarrassed myself.

    Roger Mayer: "I remember listening to the acetate [of the Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band LP] in the flat [Jimi & Chas’, 43 Upper Berkeley Street] and Jimi kept saying, 'Lis*ten to that!'

    "It was never a question of can we do it? With Jimi it was 'Let's do it.' Let's be on the cut*ting edge. That was the whole premise about it. Let's blow some fucking minds here. So Jimi would get up the Saville Theatre and The Beatles are there: 'Let's play 'Sergeant Pepper' for them.'"
    Last edited by stplsd; 05-02-16 at 03:53 PM.
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: 1967-06-04 The Saville Theater, London, England

    '
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "That's the best news I ever heard" Bob Dylan

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    Re: 1967-06-04 The Saville Theater, London, England

    Howard ‘H’ Parker (then a JHE roady): “The best concerts, I think, he ever gave in England were the Saville Theatre concerts. The Saville Theatre was owned by Brian Epstein, eh, and it was more or less a hobby for Epstein. Ehh, eh, he’d-he it was-it was the best presentation of rock and roll in London, it, he had this theatre and he put on the bands that he liked. I remember one night, Marshall had given us some new amplifiers to try out, some eight by ten cabinets, aand they really weren’t working at all. I think I changed five amplifiers over for one amplifier and still none of it, none of it worked efficiently. But that was, that, sort of, worked out all right, in one way, because that, that night we’d got a stroboscope on him. This was at the Saville, yeah, and, w’, eh, wi’-it came to ‘Wild Thing’, and I’d given instructions to the lighting engineer in, in the theatre to turn all the lights out. And we turned all the lights out, and I had this stroboscope and I put the stroboscope onto its most hypno’-hypnotic pattern, aaand with all the lights out that was the only light, the only thing by which you could see anything was this stroboscope. When it came to ‘Wild Thing’ he just tore into those amplifiers, just knocked them, took his guitar off, swung it ‘round his head, smashed them every which way. Hit the, Mitch was on a double drum riser which meant that he was si’-sitting, like, his, his feet would be, like, four or five feet up in the air and Jimi was just smashing at it, so then the drums were starting to roll off the stage because he was knocking the legs off the drum riser. Aaand all this was going on e’, on just an every other frame level. It was like he was a demon, running ‘round, he was, I think he was wearing a red velvet suit that night [he wasn’t, but that’s a great image Ed.]. And he was running ‘round the stage smashing everything just under the, just under the light of the stroboscope. And the audience rose up out of their seats like some tidal wave and just surged to the front. Aaand I think they, I think he’s, well, he just threw the bits of the guitar out at them that night.”
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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