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Thread: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    Eric BURDON.

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    Quote Originally Posted by vkd108 View Post

    Equally interesting is that he was lying on top of the made bed fully clothed, which isn't a normal going-to-sleep type of thing to do. (The normal is to take off the day clothes and get into the bed (between the sheets type of thing).
    Rock stars on drugs aren't normal.

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    Quote Originally Posted by vkd108 View Post
    Burden wasn't there when the body was there. When the ambulance came there was no-one. He most likely told Dannemann to get out of the way when she rang him too.

    What I find most interesting is that the post mortem found rice in his stomach partially digested, rice that he would've eaten around midnight, which in and of itself puts the death time at around 1:30am as any later the rice would've been completely digested, so said the pathologist.

    Equally interesting is that he was lying on top of the made bed fully clothed, which isn't a normal going-to-sleep type of thing to do. (The normal is to take off the day clothes and get into the bed (between the sheets type of thing).
    I disagree, I think he did go there when the body was in there as I thought in Caesar's book he claims Burdon watched the ambulance from across the road...therefore its possible that he went into the flat. the guys a snake.
    " Coz i'm a million miles away, and at the same time, i'm right here, in your picture frame "

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    DAILY MAIL - LONDON, ENGLAND 22 June 2011

    'Red wine could have led to Jimi Hendrix's death', says close friend Meic Stevens

    The doctor who attempted to save Jimi Hendrix on the night that the guitarist died said it was 'plausible' he was murdered because he 'drowned in red wine'.

    But the iconic musician may have choked and died because he did not know how to drink the substance, close friend Meic Stevens has revealed.

    Speaking publicly for the first time about the night leading to Hendrix's death, the singer-songwriter said the star was mixing red wine with lager and drinking the concoction from a pint glass.

    He said: ‘I was with Jimi Hendrix the night he died. He had been drinking red wine with me - even though he had never drunk red wine in his life before.

    The 69-year-old claimed he and Hendrix had been having a night out with Marmalade stars Gary Farr and Jimmy Cregan, as well as Eric Clapton, at the infamous Scotch of St James bar in Mayfair.

    In an interview for Radio 4 documentary Free Wales Harmony, Mr Stevens claimed Hendrix was intrigued that he was drinking Louis St George Burgundy and wanted to try it.

    He added: ‘[Hendrix] was drinking lager or some kind of beer and he just poured the wine in to the pint glass. I don’t think he had ever drunk red wine before – he didn’t know how to drink it.

    ‘But he seemed okay. He seemed to be alright. But the next day I woke up late and somebody phoned and said Jimi’s dead. Apparently he choked on his own vomit.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz...c-Stevens.html

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    In all the material written about `jimi and the room at Samarkand. I didn't fully realise that he was fully dressed when he was found by paramedics. then again I watched journalist Anne bjordnal say on camera (in an old documentary about 20 Years ago) that she watched him take lots of sleeping pills and fall asleep on top of the bed n I think it a Copenhagen hotel room. she said when he awoke the next morning the first thing he said was "I want to brush my teeth!" It could of been the same sad scenario the night in Dannemans hotel room. Again we';; never know the exact details of his final hours when ne arrived back with her.

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    Quote Originally Posted by sidesofthesky View Post
    In all the material written about `jimi and the room at Samarkand. I didn't fully realise that he was fully dressed when he was found by paramedics. then again I watched journalist Anne bjordnal say on camera (in an old documentary about 20 Years ago) that she watched him take lots of sleeping pills and fall asleep on top of the bed n I think it a Copenhagen hotel room. she said when he awoke the next morning the first thing he said was "I want to brush my teeth!" It could of been the same sad scenario the night in Dannemans hotel room. Again we';; never know the exact details of his final hours when ne arrived back with her.
    It wasn't Anne Björndal and Copenhagen, it was a Swedish girlfriend in Gothenburg.

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    Quote Originally Posted by RobbieRadio View Post
    DAILY MAIL - LONDON, ENGLAND 22 June 2011

    'Red wine could have led to Jimi Hendrix's death', says close friend Meic Stevens

    The doctor who attempted to save Jimi Hendrix on the night that the guitarist died said it was 'plausible' he was murdered because he 'drowned in red wine'.

    But the iconic musician may have choked and died because he did not know how to drink the substance, close friend Meic Stevens has revealed.

    Speaking publicly for the first time about the night leading to Hendrix's death, the singer-songwriter said the star was mixing red wine with lager and drinking the concoction from a pint glass.

    He said: ‘I was with Jimi Hendrix the night he died. He had been drinking red wine with me - even though he had never drunk red wine in his life before.

    The 69-year-old claimed he and Hendrix had been having a night out with Marmalade stars Gary Farr and Jimmy Cregan, as well as Eric Clapton, at the infamous Scotch of St James bar in Mayfair.

    In an interview for Radio 4 documentary Free Wales Harmony, Mr Stevens claimed Hendrix was intrigued that he was drinking Louis St George Burgundy and wanted to try it.

    He added: ‘[Hendrix] was drinking lager or some kind of beer and he just poured the wine in to the pint glass. I don’t think he had ever drunk red wine before – he didn’t know how to drink it.

    ‘But he seemed okay. He seemed to be alright. But the next day I woke up late and somebody phoned and said Jimi’s dead. Apparently he choked on his own vomit.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz...c-Stevens.html
    Wow, such bullshit.

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    INTERVIEW WITH ALVENIA BRIDGES - Says Monika was "sitting there" when she got to the hospital.

    Talks about it at the 3:40 mark https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QXmx6w2IOZ8

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    Quote Originally Posted by RobbieRadio View Post
    INTERVIEW WITH ALVENIA BRIDGES - Says Monika was "sitting there" when she got to the hospital.

    Talks about it at the 3:40 mark https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QXmx6w2IOZ8
    Thanks for the link. Very interesting to see and hear her speak. Just wish they closed the damn window to shut that traffic noise up!

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    FROM JERRY HOPKINS BOOK

    Buddy was fired peremptorily, Mike told Jimi the Experience was being reformed, whether he liked it or not, and the one-page agreement was brought out again. Noel and Mitch were already standing in the wings waiting for the call.

    Noel Redding says the crucial meeting took place during the first week of February. He was present at the Madison Square Garden concert, he says, because Mike had called him to New York from his home in Britain. He was told then that the reunion was a certainty.

    At the time, Jimi had no idea. And when Mike called him in, he resisted as he had a week before. Mike showed Jimi some financial statements he had worked up that afternoon. Mike said Jimi hadn't delivered an album to Reprise in almost two years, and, according to his contract, he was supposed to deliver two each year; that meant he owed Reprise four albums. Plus the $250,000 advance by Reprise to build the Electric Lady Studios.

    There was more. Jimi still owed his lawyers for the Toronto trial defense. The current bill from the Record Plant was more than $15,000. He was hiring limousines and having them stand by around the clock while he partied or slept. This cost him another $5,000 a month.

    The money wasn't coming in now. His European royalties were still frozen, thanks to Ed Chalpin's lawsuit. Jimi was paid well for his Fillmore East shows, but otherwise he hadn't worked once since Woodstock.

    Mike held the heaviest blow until last.

    "Jimi," he said, picking up the one-page agreement to reunite the original Experience, "there are a lot of unpaid taxes too."

    Jimi panicked. Visions of Joe Louis on the ropes filled his head. So stoned, of course he signed on the dotted line.

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    KIRSTEN NEFER

    Jimi told me that after the Swedish concerts 1970 he was exhausted, violated, could not sleep and then he had taken a handful of sleeping pills, Mandrax.
    I experienced the horrific 20 minutes he was on stage at Vejlby-Risskov Hall, Aarhus, where he came behind and collapsed afterwards.
    Back at the hotel we were greeted by another journalist.
    When he was out of bed, Jimi got better and got more ready, but he did not dare to sleep for fear that, due to sleepers, he would never wake again.
    So we talked all night long.

    Methaqualone, sold under the brand name Quaalude and sometimes stylized "Quāālude" in the United States and Mandrax in the United Kingdom and South Africa, is a sedative and hypnotic medication.

    It's use peaked in the early 1970s as a hypnotic, for the treatment of insomnia, and as a sedative and muscle relaxant.
    Last edited by RobbieRadio; 10-29-18 at 11:55 AM.

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    Quote Originally Posted by sidesofthesky View Post
    In all the material written about `jimi and the room at Samarkand. I didn't fully realise that he was fully dressed when he was found by paramedics. then again I watched journalist Anne bjordnal say on camera (in an old documentary about 20 Years ago) that she watched him take lots of sleeping pills and fall asleep on top of the bed n I think it a Copenhagen hotel room. she said when he awoke the next morning the first thing he said was "I want to brush my teeth!" It could of been the same sad scenario the night in Dannemans hotel room. Again we';; never know the exact details of his final hours when ne arrived back with her.
    He was wearing the same clothes, that he was wearing on the 17th in the photos Monika took, when the paramedics found him. Why would he go to bed at 7 AM as Monika stated, fully clothed?
    The paramedics said there was a scarf around his neck. Just as in the photos.
    Last edited by RobbieRadio; 10-29-18 at 02:02 PM.

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    Excerpt From The Book: Hendrix: The Final Days By Tony Brown.

    THE AMBULANCE CREW

    The ambulance call was officially logged at 11:18 AM, but it's still unclear who actually made that call.

    The Samarkand was a residential hotel which is still owned by Danny Hall. It has notbeen possible to verify if each individual room of the hotel had a separate telephone with a direct outside line at that time.The ambulance reached the Samarkand Hotel in nine minutes at 11:27.

    The crew on board that morning comprised Reginald Jones, who had been an ambulance attendant for thirty years, and who was driving the ambulance that day, and John Saua, who had been in the service for twenty years. Reg Jones's usual crew partner was off duty on sick leave, and Saua was his replacement that week.

    Reg Jones: "It was horrific, we arrived at the flat, the door was flung wide open, nobody about, just the body on the bed. We called out for someone, loads of times, so we walked in. We went into the bedroom, it was very dark because the curtains were still pulled, I mean the gas fire was on but you couldn't see anything, your eyes had to adjust. He was covered in vomit, there was tons of it all over the pillow, black and brown it was. His airway was completely blocked all the way down, his tongue had fallen back, he was flat on his back you see.

    The room was dark, we had to pull the curtains. Well we had to get the police, we only had him and an empty flat, so John ran up and radioed, got the aspirator too. We felt his pulse between his shoulders, pinched his earlobe and nose, showed a light in his eyes, but there was no response at all. I knew he was dead as soon as I walked in the room, you get a feel for it, I can't explain it, but you do and I knew he was dead.

    Once the police arrived which seemed like no time at all, we got him off to the hospital as quick as we could. See we just have to keep working on him and we did, my shirt was wringing wet. 'Cos the ambulances in them days, weren't equipped like they are now, we had them crazy Wadhams [type of ambulance] in them days, awful they was.

    We took him to St. Mary Abbots. That don't have a casualty ward now but in them days it did. "That was our designated hospital for the day. There was a 'bed state' at St. Charles, you found out at the beginning of your shift what your designated hospital was."

    Did anyone come along in the ambulance with you? "No, Mr Saua was with Jimi, I didn't know he was Jimi Hendrix - a bit out of my age group. When we got him to the hospital, we had to clean the ambulance out, it really was a mess. His bowels and bladder, all that goes when you're dead. That flat must've needed a good clean too."

    Did you sit him up in the ambulance? "Sit him up? No, you don't sit people up when they've choked. The steps up from the flat were steep, and you had a natural incline on the way up, but no, he wasn't sat up."

    Did you speak to anyone at the flat or on the way? 'Just the police and hospital staff."

    John Saua confirms Reg Jones' story: "Well I remember we had a hell of a time trying to suck him out [with an aspirator]. I mean the vomit was dry, and there was a hell of a lot of it.The aspirators in those days were all right but not like you have today, they couldn't shift that lot. I mean we knew it was hopeless, nothing would have worked. To tell you the truth, I thought it was an overdose. It wasn't really my business to diagnose, I just had to keep working. There were no bed clothes on top of him.

    An ambulance crew by law just has to keep on working on him until we get him to hospital. There was no pulse, no respiration. We got down to the flat, and there was nobody but the body on the bed. So we had to radio for the police from the ambulance. We couldn't touch anything in the flat. As I say, we knew he was gone, he was on top of the bed dressed, but I did not recognize him, don't know anybody would have recognized him, his mother wouldn't have recognized him. He was in a pool of vomit, it was everywhere, but we are not doctors, it's our job to keep trying till we get him to hospital, we can't proclaim him dead ... I vaguely remember taking a sample of the vomit in a container, because we didn't know what he had taken.

    So as soon as the police arrived, we were off. I was in the back with Jimi, Reg drove. When we moved him, the gases were gurgling, you get that when someone has died, it wasn't too pleasant. The vomit was all the way down, we couldn't have got an airway down. He was flat on his back, it's a shame he wasn't on his side because he probably would have pulled through.

    "Neither John Saua nor Reg Jones had spoken to each other since the week they had worked together in September 1970. Reg's usual crew partner had returned and John went back to his own station - yet their recollections remain strikingly similar.

    John Saua was interviewed for the BBC Radio One's Wink Of An Eye broadcast on September 10, 1995. On the programme he said: "there's a standard procedure especially for someone who's unconscious. They travel on their side. All the equipment is there at his head if you need to do resuscitation, anything like that, it's all there ready to use." He reiterates the fact that Monika did not travel with them to the hospital. "There was just me and the casualty and Reg the driver. Nobody else."

    In January 1992, David Smith, Press and Public Affairs Manager of the London Ambulance Service, issued an official statement after conducting his own investigation into the conduct of the Ambulance men that morning. "In light of our extensive enquiries it is apparent that the ambulance men acted in a proper and professional manner," his statement said. "There was no one else, except the deceased, at the flat [22 Lansdowne Crescent, London WI] when they arrived; nor did anyone else accompany them in the ambulance to St. Mary Abbots Hospital."

    At about 11:30 pm, PC Ian Smith and PC Tom Keene, police officers attached to nearby Notting Date police station, responded to the call from ambulance HQ and went to the Samarkand Hotel. They arrived within minutes of getting the call.

    Ian Smith, now a publican in Aylesbury, remembers that day vividly: "We went to a basement flat at Lansdowne Crescent. The ambulance men were there but Jimi was dead. It wasn't very pleasant, they had to take some of the bedding from around him. He was dressed but there was a lot of mess, so they just wrapped it around his body and took him off. There was really nothing they could do for him. We followed them up the stairs. I watched them put him in the ambulance and take off."

    Asked if there was anyone else there, Smith replied. "No, I remember quite clearly the doors shutting on the crew and Jimi. We just closed up the flat as there was no one about. If she'd (Monica) been in the flat, they would never have called us to come, because they just could've taken him as normal. But because no one was there, he was dead and circumstances were a little odd, suspicious, they radioed their control to get us in. It wasn't until later in the day that I found out that it was Jimi Hendrix."

    In a subsequent interview with the author, Smith stated: "I've had a few people coming to interview me. Basically all I can tell them is that I was around at the time, I didn't see him, I was there as they were carrying him out. I didn't know who he was till later." Tom Keene, the second police offer at the scene, has never been located.

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    Quote Originally Posted by RobbieRadio View Post
    Excerpt From The Book: Hendrix: The Final Days By Tony Brown.
    What bugs me is that in CG's book the Last Weeks, the ambulance crew tell a totally different story. Which version is the correct one? The truth must be there in between both versions. I can't believe that Tony Browns book has a completely made up version of events as is more or less claimed in the Last Weeks. In the end it doesn't matter really the result is the same. I personally think when you look at the bigger picture and piece the circumstances together it leads to the conclusion Jimi pushed it one too many times and didn't have luck or backup on his side that one last time. Such a sad waste of an incredible talent and spirit.

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    Excerpt From The Book: "Through Gypsy Eyes" By Kathy Etchingham

    Nick and I were getting ready to go out to dinner when Noel Redding rang from his home in Ireland. I could tell immediately that he was in a terrible state and in tears. 'Can you help me,' he wanted to know, 'I've been served a writ by Monika Danneman.'

    'What for?' I asked.

    'Well,' he explained, 'you know I've written a book. I said that after Jimi was sick on the night he died, Monika went out for cigarettes. The writ says I'm accusing her of negligence.'

    'I don't know what I can do,' I said, 'but let me think about it and come back to you.'

    That evening I remembered Dee, Mitch Mitchell's girlfriend, who I had met briefly a couple of weeks before when Mitch had launched his book (books on the sixties seemed to be coming out every few minutes at that time) at the Hard Rock Cafe in London. Dee had sent me an invitation out of the blue and, since I hadn't seen Mitch in years, I had decided to go down there to see him and any other old faces that might turn up. Dee told me her name was Diana Bonham-Carter and that she was a member of the famous family of British aristocrats. She was a very entertaining and witty character and one of the things she had told me was that she had once been a BBC researcher.

    It occurred to me that she might be a good person to do some digging into what had really happened after Jimi's death. Perhaps she could find the ambulance men and doctors who were on duty that day and ask them to clarify things. I wanted to help Noel so I asked her if she thought she could do anything.

    'Well, I don't really get on very well with Noel,' she told me, 'but I would be happy to try to help.' She was true to her word and a week or so later she came back to me having tracked down the ambulance drivers, who, in over twenty years, had never ever been interviewed or spoken to about the events of that mornmg.

    'I started at the ambulance station for the area,' she explained, 'and they sent me to their retirement association. Someone there remembered who one of them was, Reg Jones, and I rang him. He said he remembered the case. 'But when we got there the bloke was already dead. He didn't die in the ambulance,' he explained.

    Dee asked him nicely if we could take him out to lunch to talk about it some more, and he readily agreed. Since Dee didn't have a car I arranged to pick Reg up and then take him to meet Dee in a pub we knew in Holland Park.When we finally drew up in front of the pub he gave a satisfied nod and said, 'Well, for a woman you're not a bad driver.'

    Once we got settled, Reg told us his story. 'When we got to the flat the door was wide open. The body was on the bed, covered in vomit of all colours, black, brown; all over him, all over the pillow. There wasn't another soul in sight. I went back to the ambulance for an aspirator. We tried to revive him but we couldn't. The vomit was all dried, like he'd been lying there a long time. There was no heartbeat. He was blue, not breathing and not responding to light or pain. We called the police from the radio in the ambulance, thinking he was dead and that the circumstances were strange. A couple of young policemen turned up and they told us to take him to the hospital.'

    'Is that the normal procedure?' I asked.

    'No. Strictly speaking they shouldn't have done that but they didn't want to have to spend the whole afternoon filling in forms. We helped them out by taking the deceased to the casualty department. None of us realized it was Jimi Hendrix until we read it in the newspapers later that day.'

    What the policemen should have done if they found a dead body was call in the CID, but as far as they were concerned this was just another dead junkie in Notting Hill. Had Jimi been in the Cumberland Hotel where everyone knew who he was, it would have been a different story.

    Reg's account completely contradicted everything that Monika had been telling people. She said she rode in the ambulance withJimi and that he was still alive. Reg claimed that there was no one else at the scene, that no one came with them in the ambulance and thatJimi was already dead when they turned up. We really needed to find the other ambulance man to see if his story was the same or if Reg's memory had become clouded with time. Unfortunately Reg could only remember that it wasn't his usual partner working with him that day, and he thought the man's name was an unusual one like Sual.

    Dee went back to her contact at the retirement association and told him about Sual. He got back to her almost straight away. 'I've had another look at my book,' he said, 'and the bloke's name was Suau.'

    Directory Enquiries told us there was only one person with that name in London, who turned out to be the ambulance man's father. I gave him a ring. 'My son lives in Ashby de la Zouch now,' he told us, 'I'll give you his number.'

    Dee rang him, with me listening in on the extension, and asked him all the same questions we had asked Reg. His answers were exactly the same. He corroborated his partner's story completely. At the end of the conversation Dee said, 'Don't you remember the blonde girl who was there? She had long, silverblonde hair and a German accent.' There was an extended silence and then he said, 'Doesn't ring any bells. I don't remember there being anyone there.'

    We were now sure that Monika's version of the story had been adapted to suit her needs, but we felt we needed to gather as much evidence as possible for Noel before confronting her lawyers. The myth of Jimi's death which had been more or less accepted for over twenty years was beginning to unravel before our eyes.

    The next thing we tried to do was find the policemen who had attended the scene, which proved to be difficult. Eventually we heard that one of them, who was now a publican in Aylesbury, had been talking to a rock journalist about that morning in Notting Hill. We went up on the train to see him and his story fitted exactly with the other two: Jimi was dead when he got to the hotel. He thought he was with another policeman but couldn't remember who he was.

    Donald Teare, the man who had actually done the autopsy on Jimi, was dead so we needed to talk to another expert. Dr Rufus Crompton, Director of Forensic Medicine at St George's Medical School had worked with Professor Teare. We gave him a copy of the autopsy report and asked how, in his opinion, jimi had died.

    'He would have died from the amount of sleeping pills he had taken anyway,' he told us. 'The fact that he vomited and inhaled the vomit just hastened it. The reading in his liver was so high he couldn't have survived it. He couldn't have been breathing by the time he reached the hospital because his lungs were full of fluid, half a pint in one of them. What makes you think he took nine of these tablets?'

    'The girl who was with him said that's what happened,' we explained.

    'Well,' the doctor looked doubtful, 'I would say you wouldn't need more than about five of those tablets to get this reading but I'll ask a toxicologist what the dose could have been.' Dee told me the toxicologist said that it was impossible to say. It could have been as few as four tablets or as many as nine.

    Suddenly the picture had changed again. Instead of the image of the irresponsible rock star knocking back handfuls of pills, which the media had been happy to run with and build on, it seemed that he might have taken just a few. Monika had said that the tablets were very weak. If this was what she told Jimi he could have taken four or five just to get to sleep.

    I knew that Eric Burdon had written about the morning of Jimi's death in his autobiography. Ronnie Money had given me her copy of the book when I visited her once and so I looked it out and read it again. He wrote that jimi had been jamming with him at Ronnie Scott's club in Frith Street the night before (in fact it may have been a couple of nights before). Eric claimed that Monika had rung him and his girlfriend Alvinia, very early in the morning, saying that jimi was so stoned she couldn't wake him up. Eric suggested hot coffee and a slap round the face and went back to sleep. As he dozed, alarm bells started going in his head and he rang Monika back, telling her to call an ambulance quickly. She protested that she couldn't because there were drugs in the flat. He told her to get rid of them but to get help fast. He promised to come over as quickly as he could, Alvinia going on ahead. He said he got to the flat just as the ambulance was leaving and that Alvinia and Monika were both crying. I phoned Eric to ask him more, recording the conversation so that I could play it back to Dee.

    'Well,' I said, 'what happened that morning, Eric? Where was Jimi when you got there?'

    'I think I saw Jimi on the bed,' he admitted, 'but I couldn't look because of the mess.' He told me that he and Terry the Pill, his road manager, tried to clean the flat up so that when the ambulance arrived they wouldn't find any incriminating evidence. At some later stage Gerry Stickells went down there as well. The more we found out, the more Jimi's death looked like a black farce with all these people rushing around trying to cover up for a man who was almost certainly dead.

    What I couldn't work out was why there was a gap between Monika and Eric talking on the phone at about six or six-thirty in the morning and the ambulance actually being called at eleven-eighteen. What had Monika been doing in the intervening hours? She admitted she went out for cigarettes, but that wouldn't have taken long.

    Nothing that happened that morning, it was turning out, was anything like the version the authorities had accepted as being true, and it seemed to me that we had enough evidence to warrant a reopening of the inquest. I compiled a file and sent it to the Attorney General, pointing out that at the original inquest they had all been happy to take Monika's word for what happened, but that the people who were there on the morning in question told a completely different story. I explained that Monika was saying the ambulance men and doctors were responsible for his death and that if that was so, an official complaint
    Last edited by RobbieRadio; 10-31-18 at 06:02 PM.

  24. #556
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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    Quote Originally Posted by RobbieRadio View Post
    He was wearing the same clothes, that he was wearing on the 17th in the photos Monika took, when the paramedics found him. Why would he go to bed at 7 AM as Monika stated, fully clothed?
    The paramedics said there was a scarf around his neck. Just as in the photos.
    In Gothenburg (not in Copenhagen) (not with Kirsten Nefer) he fell asleep fully clothed according to his Swedish girlfriend (the "teethbrushing" story).
    So was apparently doing that sometimes. But that doesn't jibe with what Monika claimed about the fateful night in London; it's weird he would go to bed fully clothed if he didn't immediately down sleeping pills . Unless he really wanted to keep his clothes on to avoid any intercourse.

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    My comment about the clothing was about the 18th NOT about Gothenburg and Copenhagen. In reply to the other comment about the 18th.

    Quote Originally Posted by dino77 View Post
    In Gothenburg (not in Copenhagen) (not with Kirsten Nefer) he fell asleep fully clothed according to his Swedish girlfriend (the "teethbrushing" story).
    So was apparently doing that sometimes. But that doesn't jibe with what Monika claimed about the fateful night in London; it's weird he would go to bed fully clothed if he didn't immediately down sleeping pills . Unless he really wanted to keep his clothes on to avoid any intercourse.

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    Re: "Until We Meet Again : The Last Weeks Of Jimi Hendrix"

    Quote Originally Posted by RobbieRadio View Post
    My comment about the clothing was about the 18th NOT about Gothenburg and Copenhagen. In reply to the other comment about the 18th.
    I know, I just corrected what the poster you quoted said. The rest of my comment is QUITE OBVIOUSLY about the 18th. Why would Jimi go to bed fully dressed including scarf if he didn't plan on downing sleeping pills immediately.

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