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Thread: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

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    1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Friday, January 23rd, 1970

    Ezy Ryder/MLK
    Villanova Junction
    Burning Desire
    Blue Suede Shoes/Slow Time Blues
    Highways Of Desire/7Dollars In My Pocket
    Midnight Lightning
    Country Blues
    Once I Had A Woman
    Astro Man


    Musicians/Engineers

    Jimi Hendrix
    Buddy Miles
    Billy Cox
    -----
    Bob Hughes


    notes
    This massive session has become one of the most well-known 'Band Of Gypsys' studio sessions. Numerous songs from this marathon session have turned up on albums and bootlegs dating all the way back to the 1970's. Blue Suede Shoes was the first to be released on Loose Ends in 1974 where you hear Jimi explaining to Buddy Miles how he wants the drum beat to sound. The full version is not too dissimilar from the famous Berkeley version that would occur four months later and soilders on for 11 minutes. One take of Midnight Lightning was used by Alan Douglas as the title track of his 1975 album, Midnight Lightning
    . Parts Ezy Ryder/MLK were used during Captain Coconut on 1975's Crash Landing, but turned up in it's original form on 2006's Burning Desire. Country Blues turned un on the 2000 MCA Boxset, Once I Had A Woman turned up on the 1994 :Blues album. The massive 27+minute exploration of Villanova Junction was presented as Record Plant 2x and Villanova Junction Blues (split up and in reverse order for some reason) on the 2006 Dagger album, Burning Desire. Burning Desire and Slow Time Blues also turned up on the album Burning Desire.

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Quote Originally Posted by EddieHazel74 View Post
    Friday, January 23rd, 1970

    Ezy Ryder/MLK
    Villanova Junction
    Burning Desire
    Blue Suede Shoes/Slow Time Blues
    Highways Of Desire/7Dollars In My Pocket
    Midnight Lightning
    Country Blues
    Once I Had A Woman
    Astro Man


    Musicians/Engineers

    Jimi Hendrix
    Buddy Miles
    Billy Cox
    -----
    Bob Hughes


    notes
    This massive session has become one of the most well-known 'Band Of Gypsys' studio sessions. Numerous songs from this marathon session have turned up on albums and bootlegs dating all the way back to the 1970's. Blue Suede Shoes was the first to be released on Loose Ends in 1974 where you hear Jimi explaining to Buddy Miles how he wants the drum beat to sound. The full version is not too dissimilar from the famous Berkeley version that would occur four months later and soilders on for 11 minutes. One take of Midnight Lightning was used by Alan Douglas as the title track of his 1975 album, Midnight Lightning
    . Parts Ezy Ryder/MLK were used during Captain Coconut on 1975's Crash Landing, but turned up in it's original form on 2006's Burning Desire. Country Blues turned un on the 2000 MCA Boxset, Once I Had A Woman turned up on the 1994 :Blues album. The massive 27+minute exploration of Villanova Junction was presented as Record Plant 2x and Villanova Junction Blues (split up and in reverse order for some reason) on the 2006 Dagger album, Burning Desire. Burning Desire and Slow Time Blues also turned up on the album Burning Desire.
    Thanks for highlighting this exceptional and "mysterious" session, but hardly "massive" - try a stop watch, how long? There's 24 hours in a day!! (I see it as a "farewell jam" after Jimi had parted ways with the BOG's, having completed their project - Chalpin's 'free' LP [BOG's]. He had already 'paid them off' (ie 'let them go') as full time employees with benefits - a week's notice in advance. Although they still recorded with him a couple of times during that final week. This is the last 'session', last day of that final week. There are no overdubs, it wasn't revisited by JH. A souvenir?)

    All these songs have been released complete in collector's circles except for 'Once I Had A Woman', and several officially as you noted above. 'Once I had a Woman' can be reconstructed easily from three releases, there are amplifier crackle problems at the beginning hence the usual edits, but it still sounds better complete - ie 'up yours perfectionist freeks!'

    This surely has to be seen as an entertaining and musically valid (mostly) exploration/insight worthy of release complete. The separation of bits of this in attempts to masquerade them as finished songs is a travesty and does no service to JH.
    It would seem important that it's determined if the harmonica is original to the session. I have a feeling it may have been overdubbed later - f'knows why it has to be, they all sound a bit stoned, he just sounds more so

    Allegations that smack was involved is put paid by Jimi's comments about grass.
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Yeah, totally. I was very confused when i first found out that Record Plant 2x and Villanova Junction were the same jam. I more or less dissapointed that EH is still releasing his material in bits and pieces. I mean, his label did that all through the 70's, 80's, and 90's and when his family finally wants to focus on releasing his musical legacy more completely, they still release it in bits? This whole session does merit an complete release, Pity something so exceptional and transcending was follow by the disasterous MSG concert only 5 days later. At least we have all this wonderful music.

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Quote Originally Posted by EddieHazel74 View Post
    Yeah, totally. I was very confused when i first found out that Record Plant 2x and Villanova Junction were the same jam. I more or less dissapointed that EH is still releasing his material in bits and pieces. I mean, his label did that all through the 70's, 80's, and 90's and when his family finally wants to focus on releasing his musical legacy more completely, they still release it in bits? This whole session does merit an complete release, Pity something so exceptional and transcending was follow by the disasterous MSG concert only 5 days later. At least we have all this wonderful music.
    it was exactly this dagger release, which made me write to Janie,and surprisingly enough,she responded.
    i told her to stop cutting stuff up and removing stuff,like the harmonica(Paul Caruso?), and give it to us as a long jam, i said we would buy it even if it was a double dagger release, not a bad idea,i think

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Quote Originally Posted by zombywoof57 View Post
    it was exactly this dagger release, which made me write to Janie,and surprisingly enough,she responded.
    i told her to stop cutting stuff up and removing stuff,like the harmonica(Paul Caruso?), and give it to us as a long jam, i said we would buy it even if it was a double dagger release, not a bad idea,i think
    Cool that you actually wrote in about this.

    Two minor comments of the nice description the the original post.
    Midnight Lightning from the same album is not from this date, but from Electric Lady, July 23.
    The harmonica played seems to have been in the studio with them, cause at one point Jimi tells him "find a key".

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    From “Ultimate Hendrix” book by John McDermott:

    Friday, January 23, 1970
    Record Plant, NY; 1st engineer Bob Hughes 2nd engineer Dave Ragno.
    1) Ezy Rider/MLK Jam
    2) Villanova Junction
    3) Record Plant 2X
    4) Slow Time Blues
    5) Burning Desire
    6) Blue Suede Shoes
    8) Highways of Desire
    9) Seven Dollars In My Pocket
    10) Midnight Lightning (Keep On Groovin')
    11) Freedom
    12) Once I Had A Woman
    13) Country Blues (jam session loosely based on Howlin' Wolfs “44”)
    14) Astro Man.
    Last edited by Luigi; 06-24-12 at 11:11 AM.

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Hey Zombiewoof- what was Janies reply to your stop cutting up stuff comment?
    " Coz i'm a million miles away, and at the same time, i'm right here, in your picture frame "

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Quote Originally Posted by Luigi View Post
    From “Ultimate Hendrix” book by John McDermott:

    Friday, January 23, 1970
    Record Plant ,NY; 1st engineer Bob Hughes 2nd engineer Dave Ragno.
    1) Ezy Rider/MLK Jam
    2) Villanova Junction
    3) Record Plant 2X
    4) Slow Time Blues
    5) Burning Desire
    6) Blue Suede Shoes
    8) Highways of Desire
    9) Seven Dollars In My Pocket
    10) Midnight Lightning (Keep On Groovin')
    11) Freedom
    12) Once I Had A Woman
    13) Country Blues (jam session loosely based on Howlin' Wolfs “44”)
    14) Astro Man.
    On the bootleg tapes you can hear that Freedom connects to Country Blues, though a few seconds seem to be missing in the transition.

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Isn't this the session with the Notorious "Don" on harmonica? I didn't see him credited below.

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Quote Originally Posted by Roland Stone View Post
    Isn't this the session with the Notorious "Don" on harmonica? I didn't see him credited below.
    Yes, but if Don was not there was better

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Fascinating! Do we know the name of harmonica player now or it's still unconfrimed?

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Quote Originally Posted by EddieHazel74 View Post
    Yeah, totally. I was very confused when i first found out that Record Plant 2x and Villanova Junction were the same jam.
    So is Slow Time Blues, they cut the jam into three.
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    From Douglas Bell site, with both "Electric Gypsy" index numbers and "Benjamin Franklin Studios" reference numbers.

    23 Jan [S1361]/[S777] Ezy Rider (41) / Jam / Cherokee Mist (17) 20:14
    23 Jan [S1361]/[S777] Ezy Rider (40) / Jam / Ch Mist (16) (official) 20:00
    23 Jan [S778]/[S777] Ezy Rider (12) / Jam / Cherokee Mist (7) 16:02 (alternate mix)
    23 Jan [S1365] (14) Villanova Junction (first part, edited) 4:10
    23 Jan (18) Villanova Junction (much longer but edited) 19:37
    23 Jan (17) Villanova Junction (longest version) 27:45
    23 Jan (20) Villanova Junction (official, inc. in 3 parts)19:47
    23 Jan (10) Burning Desire 9:21
    23 Jan [S148] (1) Blue Suede Shoes (official, start only) 1:37
    23 Jan (6) Blue Suede Shoes (alt mix with low vocals) 1:35
    23 Jan (7) Blue Suede Shoes (edited but no overdubs) 3:47
    23 Jan [S166] (3) Blue Suede Shoes (official, altered) 3:25
    23 Jan [S779] (2) Blue Suede Shoes (nearly complete) 11:02
    23 Jan [S1100]/[S972]/[S813] Freedom Jam / $7 in My Pocket 23:06
    23 Jan [S896] (6) Country Blues (official edit, slightly inc) 8:25
    23 Jan [S722] (3) Country Blues (short edit) 6:32
    23 Jan (5) Country Blues (short edit w/o harmonica) 6:19
    23 Jan [S896] (1) Country Blues (long edit with harmonica) 8:34
    23 Jan [S896] (2) Country Blues (long edit without harmonica) 8:35
    23 Jan [S896] (5) Astro Man (instrumental) 2:01
    23 Jan [S168] (3) Once I Had a Woman (official, altered, edited) 5:16
    23 Jan [S775] (2) Once I Had a Woman (unaltered, incomplete) 5:16
    23 Jan [S1049] (1) Once I Had a Woman (official, more complete) 7:47
    23 Jan (4) Once I Had a Woman (most complete version) 8:15

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Quote Originally Posted by gilbertas View Post
    From Douglas Bell site, with both "Electric Gypsy" index numbers and "Benjamin Franklin Studios" reference numbers.
    23 Jan (4) Once I Had a Woman (most complete version) 8:15
    Most complete version (9:15) has the missing intro from (2) spliced on
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Some wanted to know the outcome of my comparison research on Blue Suede Shoes (2) / Freedom (10) / Ezy Rider (11) / Highway Of Broken Hearts / Seven Dollars In My Pocket / Highway Of Desire / Midnight Lightning (3). The best sounding, most complete copy that also has the tape breaks and digital errors edited out is from a privately collected disc supplied by Funkydrummer (thank you sir!). It can be downloaded here: https://mega.nz/#!HxoDHL5D!SASiZ_hWG...PTcAALNA599lrg

    Blue Suede Shoes (false start) / Trouble (acapella) / Heartbreak Hotel (acapella) / (2) Blue Suede Shoes + (10) Freedom / (11) Ezy Rider / Highway Of Broken Hearts / Seven Dollars In My Pocket / Highway Of Desire / (3) Midnight Lightning
    Source: private collector’s disc; track courtesy of Funkydrummer.
    Studio ’70 cross-reference: disc 3 tracks 25-26
    Univibes number: S779 + S779 / S1100 / S972 / S813
    Track time as per Bell/Jimpress/actual: 11:02+23:06 (13:42+22:34) [13:36+23:05=36:41]
    Composers: Carl Lee Perkins (Carl Perkins) [Blue Suede Shoes] / Jerome Leiber & Michael Stoller [Trouble] / Thomas Russell Durden (Tommy Durden) & Mae Boren Axton [Heartbreak Hotel] / Carl Lee Perkins (Carl Perkins) [Blue Suede Shoes] / James Marshall Hendrix
    Recording date/location: January 23, 1970 Record Plant Recording Studios, 321 West 44th Street, New York, New York, USA.
    Notes: This track is usually broken up into two (or more) separate tracks with the first track being (2) Blue Suede Shoes and the second track being (10) Freedom etc. This track also contains the Jimpress entry for Heartbreak Hotel, which precedes (2) Blue Suede Shoes. Trouble is not indexed in Jimpress or elsewhere. The track begins with @1:56 of studio chatter and a false start before the actual song begins which lasts @11:34. Many source copies have spliced on at the beginning of the track the unrelated start of (1) Blue Suede Shoes (officially released on Loose Ends), which is 19 seconds of studio chatter from the June 26, 1970 Electric Lady Studios session for (12) Valleys Of Neptune – a thud-like sound in the studio followed by someone commenting what sounds like “at last”, followed by a few seconds of pre-recorded trumpet jazz playing on a tape player in the studio to which Jimi remarks “jazz”, followed by the tape player being stopped, some studio noises like dishes being stacked, then 2 seconds of Jimi goofily scat-singing, 6 seconds of various studio sounds, then Jimi commenting “OK”.
    The actual January 23, 1970 track without the unrelated studio chatter opens abruptly at the 0:20 mark with a single guitar note plucked, Jimi asking “huh?”, Buddy starting to sing Blue Suede Shoes “well it’s a-one for the money” followed by two drum strikes, Jimi singing “two for the show” then saying “oh, one for the money, two for the show, three to get ready and four to go”, then more drum noodling from Buddy, then the band beginning a 12-second false start of Blue Suede Shoes before stopping and Jimi commenting “same tempo, it’s the same tempo, OK, OK, I’m sorry, I’m sorry…turn the drums up a little louder through the ear, through the ear, um, through the ear goggles”, a couple guitar notes, Jimi saying “oh I’m stoned as hell, god damn…where’s the rest of that grass at?”, Buddy gruffly laughing in the background, Jimi goofily asking “grass at…where’s that god damn grass…OK, let’s, let’s play with this a little bit, OK here you go”, followed by Jimi’s instructions to Buddy for the drum beat and style, Billy asking something unintelligible, then Jimi goofily saying “I feel evil”, then singing “I’m evil”, then saying in a mock Elvis Presley/James Cagney voice more of the lyrics to the song Trouble (as sung by Elvis Presley – 1958, King Creole) “you want trouble? You’ve come to the right place”, then 12 seconds of Jimi singing some lyrics from Heartbreak Hotel, then Jimi saying “OK, here we go, here we go…one, two” with some mouth popping sounds as part of the count-in to the formal beginning of Blue Suede Shoes with Buddy’s cymbals intro, then Jimi again repeating the spoken Trouble lyrics “you come for trouble? You’ve come to the right place”, followed by Jimi coming in on guitar to properly start the song. There is a stop in playing or a tape break around the 3:58 mark, a second tape break around the 5:48 mark, and a third tape break around the 6:19 mark followed by 3 seconds of tape silence. Some copies have edited out the tape breaks, though in a few instances Jimi’s exclamation of “yeah!” after the third tape break has also been edited out. Don the harmonica player is first clearly heard around the 4:15 mark just after the first tape break, which could indicate that the jam was stopped in order to bring in the harmonica player and that what follows after the first tape break is actually a second take. The track ends abruptly around the 13:36 mark, which supposedly indicates a break in the tape as there is obviously missing music between the abrupt end of Blue Suede Shoes and the abrupt beginning of Freedom; this missing segment between the sections is not known to exist.
    The jam supposedly continues after the Blue Suede Shoes tape break with (10) Freedom already in progress, a slow groove with Jimi ad-libbing lyrics from Freedom from the 0:33-1:24 mark [14:07-15:00 here], “you got my soul, you got my heart, you got my home, you got my leg hangin’ out your bed, you got my love, you got my head, you got my head, you got my head...” The slow jam continues from 1:24 until 5:11 [18:44 here] when Jimi begins ad-libbing lyrics from (11) Ezy Rider up until the 6:33 mark [20:06 here]. From there the jam continues on until the 8:43 mark when things slow down even further as Jimi gives directions at 9:41 to “turn the guitar up in the earphones a little bit” [23:12 here]. After the adjustment Jimi continues ad-libbing lyrics from Ezy Rider at 9:51 [23:22 here]. At 10:45 Jimi begins the lyrics to Highway Of Broken Hearts [24:15 here]. At 12:05 things slow down even further [25:37 here] until Jimi begins singing Seven Dollars In My Pocket at the 13:44 mark [27:12 here], “I got seven dollars in my pocket, but my heart is broke as hell”; this particular segment would fit nicely with Machine Gun as it has a similar feel musically and lyrically. Still continuing the very slow blues as heard in the previous segment, at 18:46 Highway Of Desire begins, “still walking down the highway of desire” [32:11 here]. At 21:39 Jimi begins the lyrics to (3) Midnight Lightning [35:03 here]. At 22:19 Jimi picks up the pace until the track suddenly breaks off to an end at 23:19 [36:40 here].
    The Jimpress entry for (2) Blue Suede Shoes notes the complete jam time as 36:48, though in the entry for Seven Dollars In My Pocket it is noted as being 33:36. Bell notes the segment timing for (2) Blue Suede Shoes as 11:02; Jimpress notes it as 13:42. Bell notes the segment timing for (10) Freedom through (3) Midnight Lightning as 23:06; Jimpress notes it as 22:34. (10) Freedom, which is sometimes referred to as Freedom Jam, is assigned the Univibes number S1100. (11) Ezy Rider is assigned the Univibes number S972. Highway Of Broken Hearts, Seven Dollars In My Pocket, and Highway Of Desire are unreleased songs; the lyrics to each are published in Jimi Hendrix: The Ultimate Lyric Book. (3) Midnight Lightning is assigned the Univibes number S813. Midnight Lightning is also referred to as Keep On Grooving, and Lower Alcatraz. Jimi Hendrix (guitar, vocals), Billy Cox (bass), Buddy Miles (drums, voice), and Don [unknown last name] (harmonica). Engineer: Bob Hughes. Second Engineer: Dave Ragno.
    Comparison Notes: ATM 045: Sessions Vol. 1: January 23, 1970 contains two variations of this track – copy one has a track time of 12:06, the studio chatter between Jimi’s “huh?” up until “I feel evil” has been edited out, the first tape break appears at 2:07, the second tape break at 3:56, and the third tape break at 4:32 followed by 3 seconds of tape silence before the music continues; copy two is labeled “different edit” and has a track time of 11:34, the studio chatter up until “I feel evil” has been edited out, the first tape break appears at 2:02, the second tape break that would normally be found at 3:51 has been smoothly edited out, the third tape break and 3 seconds of tape silence that would normally be found at 4:27 has been edited out, including Jimi’s “yeah!” after the tape break, though the tape break can still be slightly detected at the 4:21 mark, and the track fades out prior to the abrupt ending. The copy of (10) Freedom etc. on ATM 045: Sessions Vol. 1: January 23, 1970 has a track time of 23:21 with a combined total time with (2) Blue Suede Shoes of 35:27.
    The copy on ATM 214-215: Old Time has the unrelated 19-second start of (1) Blue Suede Shoes spliced onto the beginning, the first tape break appears at 3:58, the second tape break at 5:46, the third tape break at 6:21 followed by 3 seconds of tape silence before the music continues, and has very good sound quality overall though perhaps a slight bit more tape noise than the copy on Record Plant Sessions 23 January 1970 Two Inch Master Tapes; track time = 13:42. The copy of (10) Freedom etc. on ATM 214-215: Old Time has a track time of 23:35 with a combined total time with (2) Blue Suede Shoes of 37:17.
    The copy on Funkydrummer’s privately collected “1970” disc has the unrelated 19-second start of (1) Blue Suede Shoes spliced onto the beginning, the first tape break appears at 3:58, the second tape break that would normally be found at 5:46 has been smoothly edited out, the 3 seconds of tape silence following the third tape break at 6:19 has been edited out, the running time is 13:36, and has the best sound quality overall in comparison to other sources that have the tape breaks edited out. The copy of (10) Freedom etc. on Funkydrummer’s privately collected disc has a running time of 23:05 with a combined total time with (2) Blue Suede Shoes of 36:41.
    The copy on If 6 Was 9 (collector’s disc) is labeled Blue Suede Shoes Jam, has the unrelated 19-second start of (1) Blue Suede Shoes spliced onto the beginning, the first tape break appears at 3:49, the second tape break that would normally be found at 5:37 has been smoothly edited out, and the third tape break and 3 seconds of tape silence that would normally be found at 6:12 has been edited out, though Jimi’s “yeah!” after the tape break has also been edited out; track time = 13:05. If 6 Was 9 does not include the (10) Freedom etc. segment of the complete jam.
    The copy on Mama Hasn’t Take One, Yeah! is divided into two tracks, one being the false start and the studio chatter ending at the second “You’ve come to the right place” with a track time of 2:06, the other being the actual song with a track time of 11:22, the first tape break appears at 1:32, the second tape break that would normally be found at 3:57 has been smoothly edited out, and the third tape break and 3 seconds of tape silence that would normally be found at 4:32 has been edited out, though Jimi’s “yeah!” after the tape break has also been edited out; total track time = 13:29. The copy of (10) Freedom etc. on Mama Hasn’t Take One, Yeah! is divided into two tracks, one being (10) Freedom with a track time of 12:20, the other being (11) Ezy Rider / Highway Of Broken Hearts / Seven Dollars In My Pocket / Highway Of Desire / (3) Midnight Lightning with a track time of 10:59, total track time = 23:20. The combined total time with (2) Blue Suede Shoes is 36:49.
    The copy on Old Time: Record Plant Jams 1970.01.23 has the unrelated 19-second start of (1) Blue Suede Shoes spliced onto the beginning, the first tape break appears at 3:56, the second tape break that would normally be found at 5:44 has been smoothly edited out, and the third tape break and 3 seconds of tape silence that would normally be found at 6:19 has been edited out, though Jimi’s “yeah!” after the tape break has also been edited out; track time = 13:27. The copy of (10) Freedom etc. on Old Time: Record Plant Jams 1970.01.23 has a track time of 22:35 with a combined total time with (2) Blue Suede Shoes of 36:02.
    The copy on Old Time Remaster (aka Old Time: lightly remastered version) has the unrelated 19-second start of (1) Blue Suede Shoes spliced onto the beginning, the first tape break appears at 3:57, a second tape break appears at 5:45, and the third tape break and 3 seconds of tape silence that would normally be found at 6:20 has been edited out, though Jimi’s “yeah!” after the tape break has also been edited out; track time = 13:36. The copy of (10) Freedom etc. on Old Time Remaster (aka Old Time: lightly remastered version) has a track time of 23:35 with a combined total time with (2) Blue Suede Shoes of 37:11; pitch and phase correction have been applied, plus digital clicks have been removed.
    The copy on Record Plant Jams Vol. 1 [Watch Tower] has the first tape break at 3:39, the second tape break that would normally be found at 5:30 has been smoothly edited out, the third tape break and 3 seconds of tape silence that would normally be found at 6:03 has been edited out, and the end of the track contains a split second from the start of (10) Freedom; track time = 13:29. The copy of (10) Freedom etc. on Record Plant Jams Vol. 1 [Watch Tower] is labeled Jam Session and has a track time of 23:19 with a combined total time with (2) Blue Suede Shoes of 36:48.
    The copy on Record Plant Sessions 23 January 1970 Two Inch Master Tapes has the unrelated 19-second start of (1) Blue Suede Shoes spliced onto the beginning, the first tape break appears at 4:00, the second tape break at 5:50, the third tape break at 6:26 followed by 3 seconds of tape silence before the music continues, the end of the track contains a split second from the start of (10) Freedom, and has the best sound quality overall in comparison to other sources; track time = 13:56. The copy of (10) Freedom etc. on Record Plant Sessions 23 January 1970 Two Inch Master Tapes has a track time of 23:07 with a combined total time with (2) Blue Suede Shoes of 37:03, but there are digital errors at 1:26 and possibly in other spots throughout.
    The copy on Studio ’70 omits the false start and all of the studio chatter up to the point where Jimi says “I feel evil”, the first tape break appears at 2:02, the second tape break that would normally be found at 3:53 has been smoothly edited out, and the third tape break what would normally appear at 4:39 has been edited out but so has some music content including Jimi’s “yeah!” exclamation; track time = 11:33. The copy of (10) Freedom etc. on Studio ’70 has a track time of 22:35 with a combined total time with (2) Blue Suede Shoes of 34:08.

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    >>The copy on Funkydrummer’s privately collected “1970” disc has the unrelated 19-second start of (1) Blue Suede Shoes spliced onto the beginning...

    Whoops! I will excise accordingly. Thanks for your excellent research - you the man David.

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Quote Originally Posted by dino77 View Post
    On the bootleg tapes you can hear that Freedom connects to Country Blues, though a few seconds seem to be missing in the transition.
    I had thought that - but when I reconstructed my 23rd Jan Session I stuck it in the same sequence as Sessions stated, but with some suspicion....but I will have to find a more comprehensive end of long jam into CB - anyone know the best source (longest ending?) for this offhand? Because I would like to reconstruct to be as complete as possible...

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    Re: 1970-01-23 Record Plant, New York, NY, USA

    Friday 23 January 1970, Record Plant, New York City. BOG
    FINAL BOG SESSION
    The BOG is over apart from a one off charity concert for the Vietnam Moratorium in 5 day's time.
    Billy and Buddy get their final pay cheques, last week paid in lieu, plus $1,000 bonus.
    Buddy: “I thought it was unfair. It really, really just, kind o’, was tearing at me because of the fact [it is not a ‘fact’ it’s your ‘feeling’. Ed.] that in and around the situation [?], that the management [Mike Jeffery was the only ‘management. Ed.] did not want three brothers playing together, three ‘blacks’.”
    Gerry Stickells: “I don’t really feel that-that-that is a fair-aah, assessment to say that Mike Jeffery, or whoever else involved [ie Jimi!. Ed.] didn’t want an entirely ‘black’ band. I don’t think that’s fair.”
    Trixie Sullivan (apparently unaware of the above payment.): “I think it wasn’t working. Hm? The two new members of the group. Hm? And I think it had to finish. And it finished, and it’s...You know, you can think of a million reasons and you can say, ‘Well, it’s ‘cause of this and ‘cause of that one and ‘cause of this one. But, in fact, it was because it really wasn’t working.
    If you’re talking, specifically, about-em, Buddy Miles, leaving the group and Mike sacking him. It would have been totally on Jimi’s instigation, for under no circumstances would Mike Jeffery come in and sack people without Jimi’s permission, approval and, in fact, his instigation of the whole act.”
    After the Gypsy’s:
    ‘Twin 1’: “We realised immediately that Jimi had extracted everything that he needed from the Band of Gypsys and from the Experience [ie Billy & Mitch Ed.] to take him to the next stage of his music.”
    ‘Twin’ 2: “Mmhm.
    ‘Twin’ 1: “Musical Creativity”
    ‘Twin’ 2: “Right”
    Eddie: “He was headed in a new direction. And I think the Band of Gypsys was a very good experience for him that allowed him to get to the next stage.”
    Gerry Stickells: “’70, I think, would be a year when, as far as recording was concerened, he thought he was back on his feet again. He was happy with the stuff.”
    Billy: “Yeah, I think he was happier than he’d ever been [debateable!. Ed.] because...and then he had plans for the future, he had made up his mind what he wanted to do and he had-ah, planned on doing.”
    Producer: Jimi Hendrix (Heaven Research Unlimited)
    Engineers: Bob Hughes & Dave Ragno
    Pretty much a stoned ‘farewell’ jam session:

    Villanova Junction (14, 17, 18, 20)
    (“Record Plant 2X”) part of the above)
    ‘Ezy Ryder/MLK Jam’:
    Ezy Ryder Jam (12, 40, 41) Jam/Jam/Cherokee Mist (7, 16, 17) (aka MLK)*
    Slow Time Blues (includes Jam 292 (6)) (with Don [surname ?] – harmonica)
    Burning Desire (inst) (10)

    * The middle jam section of this piece was used for the ‘Captain Coconut’ (1, 2, 3, 4) composite

    BOG & Don [surname ?] – harmonica:

    Heartbreak Hotel/Blue Suede Shoes (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)/ Freedom (10)/ Ezy Ryder (11)/ Highway Of Broken Hearts/Seven Dollars In My Pocket/Highway Of Desire/Midnight Lightning (3)
    “Country Blues” [Howlin’ Wolf’s “44”?] (1, 2, 3, 5, 6)/
    /Astro Man (5, 8)/Solo Improvisation
    Once I Had A Woman (1, 2, 3)

    Wednesday 28 January 1970, Madison Square Gardens, New York City. BOG
    2nd & final ‘gig’ of the BOG
    Following this show Buddy Miles is reminded that the BOG finished on 23 January, that his and Billy’s employment proper ended when they got their final week’s pay.

    BC: "What went down was very embarrassing, and it left Jimi angry and disillusioned. It was unfortunate. Buddy and I walked over to Madison Square Garden, went into the dressing room and there was Jimi. He was not in the best shape. Jimi was sitting next to Jeffery and we knew it wasn't going to work. Jimi was in bad shape. We thought about not going out there, because someone was trying to make assholes out of us [if that was the case, which is patently ludicrous, his name was ‘Jimi’], but we did. We thought Jimi might be able to make it, but we only got through that one song before it started coming apart."

    BM: "I was hurt when management [Mike Jeffery] told me that I was fired [you’d already been paid off nearly two weeks ago! Ed.]. It was for no obvious reason, as far as I could see. That rejection hurt me because I know that it didn't come from Jimi personally. Jimi never once said to me that I was fired or that he didn't want to use me anymore [because that’s what a manger is for Ed.]. I felt rejected. I was hurt because I broke up my band [according to the horn section (‘Freedom Express’), they’d had enough of Buddy that’s why they separated from him and changed their name to ‘Freedom Express’ Ed.]. Regardless of how fast I could have got back into it or not, that was neither here nor there. I was a part of somebody that I really wanted to be a part of. Of course I knew the man hadn't even reached his peak yet. I think he had reached the pinnacle with Mitch and Noel because he wasn't getting off anymore and I feel that me and Billy gave him that." [apparently Jimi didn’t feel the same way, just felt it hard to say, ‘No’ directly. Ed.]

    BC: "Buddy and I thought that because they had successfully marketed the Jimi Hendrix Experience as being these two white guys, with Jimi in the middle, they didn't want to change horses midstream and go with three black guys up there."[ie Jimi didn’t tell him that, he just ‘felt’ it, ie the old “is it because I’m black” scenario How about, Chalpin’s album was recorded, as was the plan and Jimi wanted to move on? See his comments below]

    BC: “Jimi truly loved Buddy, but he was the star. He was the boss. This was an unspoken issue, but all you have to do is listen to any Band Of Gypsys performance and you will hear it. We musicians have to be careful not to cross these boundary lines. You have to pay homage to Caesar. Render unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's. Sometimes that did not happen. That disturbed Jimi, and I think Buddy finally became aware of this by the end."

    Arthur Allen: "Miles and Hendrix had their times, but Buddy had an ego and that was a problem for Hendrix.
    The Band of Gypsys had a lot to do with timing. Hendrix was trying to find a way to get to the black audience. He felt that if he put together a band that could reach that audience, he would please them. He wanted to be liked by blacks but I don't think he knew what ingredients he needed."

    JMcD [according to?]: “Jimi was aggravated by Miles’ presumptive behaviour and abuse of privileges such as limousine services, dental work, and airline tickets for family members.”

    Trixie Sullivan: "The relationship Mike Jeffery had as man*ager of the Hendrix Experience, had with Jimi, was very simple. Mike took care of all the business side of things, got money when he could, and he left Jimi totally in charge of the artistic side of it. Mike would arrange all his tours but he would not interfere with the music side of things. He didn't feel that he had that right. So when it came to Jimi not being happy, on any level with the music side of things, if he men*tioned it to Mike, that he couldn't deal with it himself, or he wasn't happy, and he didn't know what to do . . . then Mike would have done it for him. But under no circumstances would Mike Jeffery come in and sack people without Jimi's permission, approval, and in fact his instigation of the whole act. Because Jimi was very specific about his music, it was his, and that's where he really excelled. Mike was very good on the man*agement side. So if you are talking specifically about Buddy Miles leaving the group and Mike sacking him, it would have been totally on Jimi's instigation, but he wouldn't have had the nerve to do it himself, because it was his friend, and he wouldn't know how to do it. So he would get Mike to do it for him. And that was normal in our organization."

    BC: "I saw that I wasn't wanted, so I came back to Nashville and decided to do something else. [Buddy asked me to join his reformed Express [the Express didn’t re-join him, he got a new band together. Ed.], but I declined. Although I did fly to Chicago to add fuzz bass to Miles's album version of "Them Changes.]"
    Last edited by stplsd; 09-09-17 at 02:53 PM.
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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