Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 32

Thread: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Various Rock Musicians Remember Jimi Hendrix

    From Guitar Player Magazine September 1975

    JESSE ED DAVIS

    There was only one topic of conversation after the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival: The Jimi Hendrix Experience.

    My friends who'd been there told me that not only did Hendrix set his guitar on fire, but he "bit it, beat it, and above all, played the greatest music you ever heard." You can imagine my anticipation as I rushed home a few weeks later with a fresh copy of "Purple Haze." Many listenings later, I decided that behind all the obvious sound effects and theatrics that amazingly came across on record, there lurked a master blues guitarist.

    I have never been one to pigeonhole music, but I nevertheless felt that the solid blues roots could not be mistaken. Over two years passed before I realized how short my categorization fell. I went on the road with Taj Mahal and passed up at least three invitations to meet and play with Hendrix. I suppose something akin to jealous rivalry caused my reluctance to meet him. Our drummer, who recorded with him, and our bass player, who jammed with him, led me to believe Jimi was a very nice fellow who just happened to play his ass off.

    I have cursed a thousand times the fact that I never met him face to face. But I've given thanks that the one time I heard him play, he really played. During the summer of 1969, I was invited to the Whiskey A Go Go in Los Angeles to see the Buddy Miles Express. Bill Rich, who was playing bass with Buddy's band, said that Jimi Hendrix might sit in. The club was hot and thumping. The horn section left the stage, along with guitarist Jimmy McCarty and the organist, and I thought the set was over. But Buddy stayed behind on drums, and Bill Rich didn't move, either. The whole audience of the nightclub was suddenly on its feet, crowding toward the stage. A girl was screaming. The noise level was deafening. A tall black man with skinny legs and a huge afro stepped easily from the dance floor to the stage. He carried a shiny black Fender Stratocaster with a maple neck and a single wah-wah pedal. After he plugged into McCarty's Sunn amp, he turned around, and I could see that it was truly Jimi Hendrixl He smiled at his two fellow musicians and seem*ed eager to play.

    At once, he began playing the opening figure to "Purple Haze." People went totally nuts. The tune was clearly unrehearsed, and after singing the first chorus, Hendrix began a long solo that seemed to last more than two hours. Actually, it was the only tune he played all night. I sat enthralled. Hendrix never made the same sound twice. I had never heard one electric guitar and a single pedal used to such an extent. It could easily have been two or three guitarists on the stage, for he gave his solos fantastic accompaniment all on his own. As he played stinging lead lines, he pushed the wah-wah pedal all the way to the treble position, and then punctuated all this with chugging comp chords, pushing the pedal all the way to the bass position. The total effect was devastating.

    This was no mere blues player. This was no mere guitarist. I had truly misjudged him. I was bearing witness to spontaneous creativity with the ultimate artistic vision of Jimi Hendrix. I was stunned. What a show! It wasn't until Axis: Bold As Love that I thought Jimi hit his full stride in the studio. He made use of every trick in the book, but with such subtlety and finesse. Tape delayed echo, phasing effects whooshing from left to right with the use of pan pots, some of the wildest equalization I've ever heard, all combined to make a very well-produced recording of excellent music. His main trick seemed to be the use of every possible effect, but with extreme moderation. I feel this is one of the most important lessons I learned from him:

    Excess through moderation can be very excellent. I wish we'd all learn that one, especially the excessive imitators. I wonder if any of us will ever be able to fully grasp all that Hendrix has given us. His inspiration is certainly not for guitarists alone. Besides his music, perhaps the greatest gift he left us is freedom, a renaissance of artistic license. He blazed so many new trails and completely shattered all preconceived notions about musical boundaries. He let us know that it all works. All of it. Any way you want to do it.
    Last edited by RobbieRadio; 06-21-17 at 01:20 PM. Reason: New Additions

  2. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to RobbieRadio For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    From Guitar Player Magazine September 1975

    ROBERT FRIPP
    The fault is generally to look at Jimi Hendrix as a guitarist. His function had little to do with the guitar. His technique was inefficient and, as an example, misled many young guitarists. The point for a young guitar player is how to try and tap the spirit of music, which Hendrix undoubtedly did, not to ape his playing. It is very easy to be misled by the forms, and inevitably a lot of young players are.

    HARVEY MANDEL
    Although Jimi and I were not close personal friends, I did have the opportunity to meet him - the first time was at the Record Plant in New York, where I was just completing my first album (Cristo Redentor), about seven or eight years ago. I remember anxiously waiting to see Jimi play his guitar up close because, from hearing him at live concerts, I thought he might have a magical something or other built into his guitar to help give him the incredible sounds he achieved. I soon discovered that he played a regular old Stratocaster through Marshall amps. He did use some gadgets, such as Univibe, Fuzz Face, and Cry Baby, but these items were available for anyone. The magic obviously came from Hendrix' own fingers. My next meeting with Jimi occurred about a year later, at the height of his popularity. It took place at a crowded club in Los Angeles. Jimi arrived unexpectedly and sat down in the crowd. I recognized him and wondered if he remembered our first meeting. Then I saw him heading toward me; he greeted me as if I were one of his closest friends, and we spent the next half hour in the back room discussing the music scene. Neither fame nor glory could build a wall between Jimi and his love of music or his fellow musicians.

    JOHN KAY
    I knew Jimi very briefly. The first time I saw him was at the Whiskey A Go Go, in Los Angeles, and he had a fantastic effect on everyone, doing tunes like "Wild Thing." Later, we used to jam at the Scene in New York. During an era of Clapton, Beck, and rock guitar of the Sixties, to me, Hendrix was the ultimate rock guitarist. The thing that affected me most was that he played his amp and wah-wah as well as his guitar. He created a cosmic sound -- something so engulfing that I ceased to be in awe of technique and was forced to become involved with the music without attempting to analyze it. When he died, I felt he had broken more barriers than anyone of his time; he showed us that music doesn't have to be two-dimensional. Yet, with all this experimentation, he never lost control of his guitar. He never permitted an electric device to take over. Once, we got together at his place in California, and he showed an astonishing amount of interest in rudimentary musical information. I barely play the guitar, yet he asked all about how we did certain things and was extremely down to earth. Later, when I saw him at a festival, he was completely changed. I think he was tired out by the demands on him. Notwithstanding Robin Trower, I have yet to hear anyone (including Mahavishnu, Beck, etc.) with the same degree of originality and inherent emotionality he forced you to respond emotionally rather than intellectually.

    TOM JOHNSTON
    Jimi Hendrix was one of the finest guitarists the rock industry has produced. He was the innovator of so many different guitar sounds and recording techniques that had never been dreamed of before. Many have copied him, but he was the original. Up till his time, no one had dared to play electronic "space" sounds; no one had panned from speaker to speaker with as many as five lead guitars at once. On top of all this, Hendrix was an extremely accomplished guitarist, in no way dependent on gadgets. Today, rock music is getting more and more into theatrics and showmanship - not that Jimi didn'.t use extreme showmanship. But we have reached a point now where the lead guitarist has fallen from view and the glitter and glamour has taken over. It makes me sad to see less emphasis on the music than on gimrnlckry by today's rock music fans. There was only one Hendrix and there will never be another - he was a complete original. I mourn his loss and value the treasury he left behind.

    FRANKE MARINO
    Jimi Hendrix was mortal, he was not a god; but his music is immortal. Jimi was simply a man. So many people regard him as sacred, and they don't realize that he just started a new style of music, like someone would start a blues or jazz style. What Jimi did was years ahead of its time - it's been nearly ten years since he wrote "Purple Haze." His music was not jive; it was coming from a very real place - it's the music of the heavens. I wish that guitar players would realize that Jimi Hendrix started the whole thing.

    When the first Hendrix album came around, I looked at it and said, "Where's the fourth member of the band?" [it looked weird - [ thought they had forgotten somebody in the picture. Guitar players doing the "heavy" thing, the three-piece groups, and the whole hard rock sound all came from that old man. Jimi was a genius. Genius is only 10% inspiration and 90% hard work. Hendrix was not recognized enough, even though people make him a sacred god. He's recognized for all the wrong reasons. I hope that I can continue what he was doing musically. I believe that when Jimi was around and everything was happening- Joplin, Woodstock, "flower power," _ Jimi was the ship. Everybody was waiting for that ship to come in and he was the ship, but everyone was at the train station, and he left. It's like a sleek race car coming around a corner and smashing against the far wall.

    CORNELL DUPREE
    Jimi Hendrix and I played together for about six or eight months around 1963 or '64, sharing lead guitar with King Curtis. When I knew him, Jimi was a pretty quiet guy. He never really had too much to say unless something was really drastically wrong - unless you stepped on his foot or harmed him' He would go off by himself or just disappear. You'd never see him till it was time to go to work. He liked the old blues players. I think everybody, if they played guitar at all, liked B. B. [King] and Albert [King]. There was another guitarist he loved to hear, Elmore James. He used a Stratocaster with a Fender Twin amp, and even then, whenever the spirit touched him, he'd start doing guitar tricks and using his teeth. He'd just up and do it. Occasionally, he used a wah-wah pedal or something like it. But there wasn't any of the new sound equipment or stuff like that- no fuzz tones. The only time Jimi got fuzz was when a speaker accidentally busted.

    LES PAUL
    It was one of those funny nights. My Number Two son, Gene, and I were taking master tapes from our home in Mahwah, New Jersey to Columbia Records in New York. This was in the mid-1960's, somewhere around 1964. We decided to drive by a nightclub in Lodi, New Jersey which usually had good talent. I stopped the car, and as usual, Gene looked in. He came back out and said, "Father, you better look for yourself. There's a guy playing all over the guitar!"

    I went in and stood in the doorway to listen. I was really impressed by what I heard. Yes indeed, that dude was really working his guitar over. He was bending strings, playing funky as hell. I'd never seen anyone so radical. We had to push on to New York, but we decided that after we'd dumped those tapes we'd hurry back to the club and nail that guy.

    A couple of hours later, that's what we tried to do. When we got back and asked around, the bartender told me some black dude had come in earlier to audition, but that his playing was too crazy for them - too wild and too loud, so he and the group he was with hadn't been hired. When last seen (about an hour before Gene and I could get back) the guitarist had been fooling around on the piano in the club. That's all anyone could tell us. No one there knew his name or where he could be found.

    I wanted to grab that guy, so I started a real F.B.I. search of my own. I told my manager and my friends at Columbia that I had heard a guy that really burned, but not knowing his name or where he made his home, locating him was 4 real problem.

    Gene and I called musicians' locals all around New York and New Jersey - no one knew who we were talking about. Finally we decided to look in every single nightclub in north and central Jersey, and also in Harlem, uptown. But with no name and only a description of a wild man with a guitar - different than what's around, more funky, raunchy - people just looked at us.

    After running out of clubs in our area, Gene and I headed down to south Jersey to see Bob Moore and the Temptations [later known as Bob Moore and the Temps] , a group that was a favorite of ours. (Whenever I wanted to hear something different, I'd go hunting for these guys. The guitarist was Roy Buchanan, and I really dug what he was into, even then.) But we couldn't find that guitarist we'd seen in Lodi. We gave up and forgot about it.

    Some time later, Walt Maguire of London Records asked if I'd come out of retirement and make an album. I agreed, and he thought maybe it would be a good idea to bring out some records of other guitarists for me to hear. In case I was drying up, I'd know what was happening. I looked through the LP's he brought me. Among those albums lying on the floor in front of the console I saw this face.

    "Wow!" I said. "There's the cat we've been looking for. That's our man!" Well, Hendrix was already a hit, and I'd heard him a jillion times, but hadn't known until I saw his face on the record jacket that this was THE MAN! Anyway, I was very pleased to know our boy had made it.

    A few years later, when Jimi was involved in building Electric Lady studios in New York he called me up with several questions, including an idea of miking a guitar amp from far away *across the room - while running the guitar directly into the board at the same time. He also wanted to know how I went into the board, and things of that sort.

    During that talk, I told Jimi the story of my hunt for him to snatch him up and get him to a record company. He really cracked up. He said, "You mean I was that close and didn't know it?"

    HENRY GOLDRICH
    Anything that was new, he hought," recalls Henry Goldrich. "Jimi always liked to be the first to use an effect."· Henry should know. He and his relatives in the family owned business served Jimi's equipment needs from 1964 until his death in 1970. Though Jimi obviously browsed in other music shops, the service and selection he found at Manny's 48th Street Musical Instruments Store (156 W. 48th St., New York, NY 10036) led him to establish an open charge account there.

    Jimi could rely on Henry to deliver eight or nine guitars by car on his way home, or ship a roomful of items ahead for a worldwide tour. Eventually, Goldrich equipped Electric Lady, Jimi's studio, from stem to stern. "Any kind of new toy or sound effect he bought immediately," Gold*rich continues. "Whenever he walked in, he was good for $1500-2000."

    Henry's father, the Manny, opened his shop in 1935, and it has survived everything from the tail end of the depression to the crunch of high rises pressing on its rib cage, supplying a phenomenal roster of musicians - before and since Hendrix - with what is said to be the largest stock of musical merchandise in this country.

    "Jimi used to buy three or four guitars every other week," Henry states. "But he lost them or gave them away. I'd see kids come in the store with guitars I'd sold Jimi the week before. If he liked a kid, he gave him his guitar, brand new."

    As a loyal customer before he was famous,' Jimi never demanded preferential treatment after. Nevertheless, Henry used to keep the store open for him after hours because Jimi began to be hounded by admirers. He would come in once a week to hang out for an hour and a half and tryout all new instruments, distortion devices, accessories. Moreover, he'd take all of them home.

    ERIC BARRETT

    Jimi used tiny amps for clubs - assorted everything - but as soon as he started doing any kind of theatre work, Chas Chandler got him a 100-Watt Marshall top with two 4" x 12" cabinets.

    When I first joined, Jimi was travelling with just two cabinets and maybe two tops. Bassist Noel Redding had two Marshall bottoms and maybe two tops. Mitch Mitchell had a kit of drums. As we were going along, it got to be four cabinets and maybe then four tops. So, if Jimi had four, then Noel had to have four. Then it got to the point Jimi had six with three 100-Watt tops on the top of those three and another one on the bottom pushing a slave on the other side for Noel to hear. So that resulted in Noel having six of these big Sunn amps with three 100- or 200-watt tops - I can't remember which - with another one at the side pushing one on Jimi's side. As soon as it got to that, Mitch said, "1 can't hear my drums." So we started off getting him all this different stuff, and we eventually ended up with four of those big Altec A-7 cabinets that people used for P.A. systems stuck up right behind his head. He'd always say, "It's not loud enough! Give me more!"

    Jimi had this thing - apart from the usual act of smashing up guitars I would build for him. If he had got everything out of a guitar that he loved, that you knew had to go out every night, it would be the first one he'd pick up, and you would have that guitar for maybe four or five months. When he figured he could get no more out of that guitar, that it had given him everything he could get, all of a sudden he would smash it, and I would go into a panic, because that was his favorite, and I'd think, "God, what's he going to use at the next gig?'" Because that meant he had to start breaking in new ones, and it did take time to break them in.

    If a string would bust, I would run out with another guitar, and we would change that in fractions of seconds. I would hold it up, he would take it off his neck, and I would slip the strap around his neck, and he would play this enormous chord. All of a sudden I would pull out one jack and go right in with another, and his hands would change down onto the same chord he was on. People very rarely heard a slump. I used to watch him constantly; I wouldn't take my eyes off the man. I was always there from instinct: If I was going to hold that job I had to be the best. Otherwise, someone else would come along.

    Some nights he'd be screaming, "Eric! This fuzz box isn't right!" So I would take out another one. He still wasn't happy with that. I took out another one. He still wasn't happy. So rather than go through 24, I would play a psychological game. I'd bring him back the very first one he had, and say, "This one is great; this one is brand new." He'd plug it in, and say, "Now that's what it should have been the first time." Same thing would happen with wah-wah pedals. You'd take them back, change it three or four times, then give him back the first one he had, and he'd say, "Yeah! Now that's what I'm talking about!" Weird, but I think all musicians do things like that.

    Jimi virtually always tuned his guitar down a half-step. In other words, his strings from lowest to highest were E-b, A-b, D-b, G-b, B-b, E-b. It's not entirely clear why he did this. However, tuning down a half-step makes the strings much more flexible for bending (which Jimi did a lot),
    Last edited by RobbieRadio; 04-27-12 at 03:05 PM.

  4. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to RobbieRadio For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    Carmine Appice - Vanilla Fudge

    I used to know Jimi Hendrix really well and Jimi said his favorite guitarist was Jeff Beck. It wasn't Eric, it wasn't Jimmy Page, it was Beck. At the end of one of Jimi's songs he did "Rice Pudding." He used to call Jimmy Page and Led Zeppelin, "Excess baggage." I'd say, "What do you mean, 'excess baggage'?" He'd say, "Oh, they ripped off from all of us, put it on their albums, now they're selling platinum, it's a rip off."

    That was right from Jimi's mouth to my ears. I went, "Holy crap."(Laughs)

    We all use to tour together on different shows. I knew Hendrix before he made it big – he was Jimi James. We played some really small empty clubs together. After we both made it big we meet at The Speakeasy in London where we played with the Fudge and became friends again. We did a full tour with Hendrix in the fall of ’68 when “Hangin’ On” was a big hit in the States. People told us and in reviews that we had stolen the show from Jimi many nights.

    We used to play clubs in New York together, opposite bands, hang out and say things like "one day we'll get out of this ghetto." He was from Seattle, living in New York, living in hotels with different people. Just living real low class. Next thing I knew he was Jimi Hendrix and I was in the Vanilla Fudge. Next time I saw him we were both in London and it was pretty funny. I said "I can't believe you're Jimi Hendrix" and he said "I can't believe you're in Vanilla Fudge." And we toured quite a bit with him, with Fudge, and we did gigs in Cactus with him. So, I sat down with him quite a bit.

    We played together at this club. I was playing with this guy Ron Leejack (Wicked Lester / Cactus), who was the only guy at the time playing like Hendrix. A couple of times Jimi and I had 15 minutes off, we'd go up and smoke a joint with black prostitutes on Broadway and 77th Street, which was a bad area at the time. And we'd talk about making it.



    1967 Fender Stratocaster that was owned and played by Jimi Hendrix. Pictured here is Carmine Appice holding this guitar. Jimi gave this guitar as a gift to James “Tappy” Wright in late 1968 – early 1969. Tappy was part of the Hendrix management with Chas Chandler, Mike Jefferey, and Bob Levine. Tappy was originally the road manager of The Animals.
    Last edited by RobbieRadio; 06-29-13 at 05:22 PM.

  6. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to RobbieRadio For This Useful Post:


  7. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    3,761
    Thanks
    1,732
    Thanked 2,148 Times in 657 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    Thanks! In another interview posted at CTT the ZZ Top guitarist Billy Gibbons mentions that he and Hendrix would study Jeff Beck albums in his hotel room. The main riff of Rice Pudding is the outro riff of In From the Storm. I am glad to see this connection confirmed here.

    But, the Tappy guitar sounds fishy. Tappy was starting to do this kind of business in 1975? How many guitars did Hendrix "give" to Tappy in that one year?

  8. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    Mick Taylor - Rolling Stones

    Taylor got a chance to see his hero Jimi Hendrix around this time, as the band spent a good deal of time in the States. “I was really into him at the time. In fact, we used to play with him a lot. We played with Jimi Hendrix and Albert King at the old FIllmore West in San Francisco...he just completely blew my mind...the way he switched from rhythm to lead, and his guitar and his voice were almost like the same thing. “ (Guitar Player, 2/80)

    Mick elaborated on his admiration for Hendrix and on his experiences with other musicians as a Bluesbreaker in the August 1998 issue of the British The Guitar Magazine: of Hendrix, he said “Awesome guitarist, and an absolutely fantastic blues player. I don’t think a lot of people appreciate that because he didn’t do too many straight blues in his short recording career, which, if you think about it, spanned only four, maybe five years. But listen to Jimi doing “Catfish Blues” and you can hear the raw influence of Muddy Waters and Albert King.

    “In John Mayall’s band I was lucky enough to do some shows on the same bill as Hendrix at the Fillmore West - Albert King was playing as well. Seeing Albert King for the first time was unbelievable - someone who had developed completely his own style, left-handed with the guitar strung upside-down. I can remember me and Jimi Hendrix standing together listening to Albert playing. Both of us were in awe of him.

    “Jimi was very humble about his own talent but also completely obsessed about playing guitar. I did a show once with him in Zurich and we all got there early. It was quite a show - Traffic were on as well as the Experience, plus some other big acts from that period - and as soon as Jimi got to this small stadium he went backstage and plugged into an amp. He was playing literally for hours before he went on t o do this most amazing show and all the other musicians were watching him with their mouths wide open. It wasn’t just that his technique was like nothing else around at the time; his feel and that timing were awesome too. Completely unique...

    “But the other great thing about being a Bluesbreaker was that it didn’t cut you off so much, and that tended to happen a lot in the Stones. I made far more lasting friendships with John Mayall than I did with the Stones simply because touring with Mayall we would spend two weeks in one place playing at a club, and I met lots of musicians - that’s exactly how I met Hendrix. And playing in Greenwich Village at a place called Club A-Go-Go a band did their first-ever gig, playing support for John Mayall - they were Blood, Sweat, and Tears. I also met and jammed with Stephen Stills, Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead...so when I did join the Stones, musically, I’d already been round the block a couple of times.”



  9. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to RobbieRadio For This Useful Post:


  10. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    Jimi Hendrix recollection from Stephen Shady

    A little true story here about my friendship with Jimmy Hendrix. I met him before the band, Shady Lady ever existed. It was kinda pretty cool how we first met though because I was just walking down the street one night in Greenwich Village . I hear this guy yelling out, "hey there....hey wait up" (or something of that nature). I look across the street to where the voice was coming from and I see it's Jimmy Hendrix. I stop walking, glance around and realize that he's talking to me. So, he comes trotting across the street and says, how are you man and starts chattering away. He said they had recently got into N.Y. and were playing at the Cafe A-Go-Go and they were having a party over at his crib tonight. He asked if I wanted to come and hangout. I said thanks but that I couldn't make it as I was on my way somewhere and that I had to go home soon anyway because I had to work the next day. He asked me where I was working and I told him the Shed House, which was this hip little clothing store in the village. Hendrix says, okay man, we go through the long hand shake stuff that was the thing amongst all the young dudes back then. He looks back and says while walking away that he'll stop by my work tomorrow.

    Well, the next afternoon sure enough he was sitting in front of the store in his baby blue corvette. Somebody in the store recognized him and said hey that's Jimmy Hendrix parked outside. I was waiting on a customer and glanced out the window and said yea it's Hendrix, he's waitin for me I guess. I knew the others in the store prolly thought I was joking. So, after I finished up with my customer I went out and sat in the 'vette with him. I know that must sound queer but believe me it wasn't. I guess he was just like looking for a pal he could talk to without all the bullshit. And you must understand I wasn't exactly a wall flower...I stood out in a crowd.....not unlike Jimmy himself.

    Anyway, we just sat there and chatted for awhile. I guess we sorta became brothers in a way. I used to run into him once in awhile after that but I never went to any of his parties or hung with his crowd of people. We mostly just kept it to light conversations while walking around or sitting on stoops of buildings in the village area. In fact it was kind of odd as we never even talked about music that I can remember.

    I saw him play a few times at The Scene though. I remember once seeing him jam with Jeff Beck there, Hendrix played bass and Mitch Mitchell was on drums. That was pretty interesting to say the least. Then of course Jimmy's star kept shining brighter and brighter. So, anyway time goes on and I hadn't run into him for quite sometime as he was traveling, touring, recording, being a superstar, etc and I was doing my own thing. Anyway, I had started putting what was to be Shady Lady together and had mentioned at some point that I knew Jimmy to my guys. I knew they prolly didn't believe me...not that I wasn't in the know and all but.....hey Hendrix was like this "huge" superstar now.

    So, some more time passes and we had just come to L.A. and had been rehearsing at a house in Laurel Canyon where these groupies Susan Stewart, Poochie, Pamela (not miss Pamela another Pamela) and some other girls all lived. There was quite a few people there one night and we were all partying when this dude shows up and he has Jimmy with him. Hendrix walks in and looks around and spots me...makes a beeline straight over and is hugging me, slapping five and saying man, "What the hell are you doing here, blah-blah-blah"

    At some point I glance over at my buddies in the band.....their eyes are wide open and all which made me laugh. Leonard who wasn't a band member of Shady Lady just yet was there and was sitting in a big circle with Bobby Paine and some other dudes and chicks in another room of the house. They were all sitting there and passing around an acoustic guitar each taking turns playing. Jimmy walks in there at one point and Bobby jumps up grinning, snatches the guitar out of Leonard's hands and thrusts it at Jimmy saying, here, your turn. So, Jimmy turns the guitar upside down does his thing and hands it back to Leonard. Leonard promptly hands it to the person sitting next to him as he wasn't gonna follow Jimmy's playing....no way. lol Leonard still has that same old Martin guitar to this day (which is a lot more beat up looking now) with a story to tell.

    That was the last time I ever saw Jimmy as he died shortly thereafter....oh I'd say it was only a couple to three weeks later at most. And man was I really sad over his death.......and I was also bummed that Jimmy never even got to see me perform or hear my band play.

    Stefen Shady
    Last edited by RobbieRadio; 08-07-14 at 11:02 PM.

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to RobbieRadio For This Useful Post:


  12. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    Artist Peter Max 2011

    The personal recollections of Max's encounters with these individuals demonstrates the amount of love he has for his subject matter.

    The Hendrix painting in question.
    ​Case in point: perhaps the most notable selection in Max's exhibit, a fairly new portrait of Jimi Hendrix, derived from a photograph of the legendary guitarist in his pre-Woodstock career.

    "I was renting a house in Woodstock," Max recalled, "and when we moved in, my little daughter found this old washed-out denim jacket. She was about four years old and she loved it, but it was so big on her that it would just drag on the floor like cape. One day, I am sitting on the porch -- and this is like three months into living there -- and some guy knocked on the screen door. It was Jimi Hendrix!"

    Through conversing with Hendrix, the nature of the legendary guitarist's visit became clear: Hendrix had previously rented a room in the house from his manager, Michael Jeffrey, and had returned to claim an old denim jacket he was particularly fond of.

    "Just as he said it, my little daughter comes walking by with the jacket dragging at her feet," Max said. "I said, 'Here is your jacket, please let me give it to you.' But he said no. The jacket was hers. She still has the jacket to this day."

    Not just music, but musicians—you have always had a ‘connection’ with musicians. I’m so lucky to have met so many beautiful, beautiful, imaginative rock stars, from Bob Dylan to Janis Joplin to Jimi Hendrix. I used to have breakfast with Jimi three or four times a week because, when I lived in Woodstock, he lived maybe fifteen blocks away, and there was a café called the Bearsville Café that we used to go to. It would be breakfast, lunch, or dinner with Hendrix, Janis, and Bob Dylan all the time. We would rotate.

  13. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to RobbieRadio For This Useful Post:


  14. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    3,761
    Thanks
    1,732
    Thanked 2,148 Times in 657 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    Quote Originally Posted by RobbieRadio View Post
    Jimi Hendrix recollection from Stephen Shady

    So, some more time passes and we had just come to L.A. and had been rehearsing at a house in Laurel Canyon where these groupies Susan Stewart, Poochie, Pamela (not miss Pamela another Pamela) and some other girls all lived. There was quite a few people there one night and we were all partying when this dude shows up and he has Jimmy with him. ...

    That was the last time I ever saw Jimmy as he died shortly thereafter....oh I'd say it was only a couple to three weeks later at most. And man was I really sad over his death.......and I was also bummed that Jimmy never even got to see me perform or hear my band play.

    Stefen Shady


    Thanks. This is interesting because there were unconfirmed claims that Hendrix was at Laurel Canyon during the Summer of 1970, jamming for example with Stephen Stills and that he opted for buying a round, Spanish style villa there. This would confirm he was actually there.

  15. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    BUDDY GUY 2012

    You talk about crossing paths with Jimi Hendrix in the book.

    That was my first time ever playing in New York. I had just played Newport Jazz Fest, in 1967. I had never met him before. I was putting on my show, and I think I had the guitar behind my head – I had more energy than that I've got now. And somebody kept whispering, "There's Jimi Hendrix." I saw this kid down on the floor, and they didn't have the little [recorders] like we've got now, where you can just press it. He had a reel-to-reel, and somebody was taping him with some kind of video. But when they said "Jimi Hendrix," I said, "Who in the hell is that?" He walked up to me and said, "I cancelled a concert to catch you, because I've been trying to catch you all my life. Can I tape what you're doing?" And I said, "I don't give a damn what you do."

  16. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    Mark Farner Of Grand Funk

    It was the second time we played the Fillmore, my manager at the time, Terry Knight, was walking the band back to the dressing room. But he had never taken the lead before. He’d always follow behind the band and security would lead us off to the dressing room.

    So Terry opens the dressing room door and here’s Jimi Hendrix standing there with his hat on. Got this little grin on his face. And I just walked up to him and I hugged him and just said, “You’re a great guitar player!” Could you imagine all of the things I could have said? I tell him he’s a great guitar player. This is my guitar god standing in front of me. Man, I’m just so taken away at that point, you could have blown me over with a feather.

    Don Brewer Of Grand Funk

    Q - Did you meet people like Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix?

    A - Yeah, we did. Hendrix came to see us one night at the Fillmore East. We played Randall's Island with Jimi Hendrix. We played the Palm Beach International Pop Festival and Janis Joplin was on that show. Did we meet them and hang around with them? No. We would cross paths and see each other. We didn't really hang around. I would say no. We would know who they were.

    Q - Did they know who you were? Did they say "nice set?"

    A - No, not really. I mean, at that time we were the up and coming thing and they were already established. We were kind of second rate. (laughs) They weren't going to spend a lot of time watching us until we started making it in 1971. Like I said, Hendrix came to see us. He came to see what we were all about.

    Q - Did he come backstage?

    A - He did come backstage. He walked in the dressing room and I didn't even recognize him. He was so under dressed. He could've been any guy off the street in New York with a little baseball cap on and a t-shirt and jacket. He wasn't the flamboyant 'hey, I'm Jimi Hendrix' all decked out. He was incognito. It was a mind blower when he came back. Fat Mattress was the opening act. That was Noel Redding's band and that's why he was there. Obviously he had asked Jimi to come down and see his band, and he stayed to catch Grand Funk, and that was great.
    Last edited by RobbieRadio; 08-07-14 at 11:02 PM.

  17. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to RobbieRadio For This Useful Post:


  18. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    Graham Nash: then of The Hollies


  19. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to RobbieRadio For This Useful Post:


  20. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    Andy Fairweather Low

    ask Andy about Hendrix.

    "In '67 we had a Wednesday residency at the Speakeasy in London. If you were gigging somewhere you'd go down there for a drink and something to eat," he said.

    "One time Jimi came down and asked if he could play bass. We were doing a batch of Otis Reading numbers. He wanted to do Can't Turn You Loose so I sang and the band played, with Jimi on bass.

    "In '69 I was in New York and I got a phone call from the studio saying 'Jimi wants to know if you'll come down and sing'. He was re-cutting Stone Free and when I arrived Roger Chapman was there – lovely man. We both sang backing vocals. It definitely wasn't better than the original version, but we were there. Fantastic memories."

  21. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to RobbieRadio For This Useful Post:


  22. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    Eric Clapton 2004

    Then, shortly after Cream started, The Jimi Hendrix Experience came along…
    We were playing at the London Polytechnic the day Jimi arrived in England and Chas Chandler brought him to see us. He said he’d like to play. And he got up and played Howlin’ Wolf’s “Killing Floor”. Even today I don’t know many people who can play that. It’s a very, very tough piece of music. But Jimi did it and then he put the guitar behind his back and I thought, “My god, this is like Buddy Guy on acid.”


    Did you feel threatened by him?

    I fell in love with him. I think Ginger and Jack felt threatened because they could see he was going to corner the market, for sure. But I felt an incredible sense of relief that there was somebody else on the planet who was as devoted to that music as I was. Of course, he was a showman. But he knew what the blues was about. I was really keen to get to know him and spend time with him. But he was an elusive guy and he wasn’t that available for friendship. I still don’t know what the real deal was with him or what his motives were or what the long-term plan was, or even if he had one. He definitely pulled the rug out from under Cream, though. I told people like Pete Townshend about him and we’d go and see him at different clubs and I wondered how he was going to make what he did work on record. Then we went off to America to record Disraeli Gears, which I thought was an incredibly good album. And when we got back no one was interested because Are You Experienced had come out and wiped everybody else out, including us. Jimi had it sewn ⌦up. He’d taken the blues and made it incredibly cutting-edge. I was in awe of him.

  23. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to RobbieRadio For This Useful Post:


  24. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    Donovan 2014

    Did you ever meet Jimi Hendrix? — Johnny Cola

    When we got into the music business, Gypsy Dave [Gyp Mills], my road buddy since we were 16, and I used to hang out with the Animals. Gypsy was dating Yvonne, a Swedish girl, and [Animals bassist] Chas Chandler was dating another Swedish girl, the friend of Gypsy’s Swedish girl. It seems a lot of rock bands were dating Swedish girls in the Sixties!
    So one day, we’re sitting around—me, Gypsy and Yvonne—and a call came in. It was Chas, and he said to Gyp, “You’ve got to get in a taxi and get to Heathrow. I’m picking up a guitar player from New York. He’s fucking amazing.” So Gypsy finally arrives at this horrible hotel we were staying in because we were busted and couldn’t go back to our apartment [laughs], and there was Jimi. He was thin, had an afro, a matchbox suitcase and a Fender guitar. We were the first to welcome Jimi to England.

  25. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to RobbieRadio For This Useful Post:


  26. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    Graeme Edge - Drummer - The Moody Blues 2014

    I was in a club called where they used to have a band setup and it was a very popular rock spot. And I was up there, just doing a jam with Jack Bruce and Eric Clapton, and Chas Chandler comes walking in with this new discovery of his—a black guy.

    Whitman:
    I know where you’re going with this …

    Edge: Yeah, and I was behind them two …

    Whitman: James Marshall Hendrix.

    Edge: That’s it. And I was playing behind them (Clapton and Hendrix) … I’ve seen it mentioned in three or four books, but nobody ever mentions the bloody drummer or bass player! (laughs)

  27. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    Bruce Fleming - Photographer - 2000

    I met Jimi Hendrix and I became his photographer. I was the first to photograph The Animals with Eric Burton when they came down from New Castle. Chas Chandler became a great friend and that’s how I met Jimi. He was Jimi’s manager. I met lots of famous people like Richard Burton and Liz Taylor through this guy, David Block. He shortened my problems of getting into the business, because I met so many people. They all liked my photographs, so I did very well.

    What was it like the first day you met Jimi?

    That was in 1966. I got a call from Chas Chandler who was playing lead guitar in The Animals. Eric Burton was the lead singer, I think he’s still singing. He rang me and said, “Bruce, come over to the office. There’s this new guy in town called Jimi Hendrix.” I had never heard of him, nobody had. So, I went to the office in Soho and there’s this tall guy with wired hair. We start talking and Chas said to me, “This guy is amazing.” Now, I’ve heard all of this shit before. Everybody who came into London was amazing. I found that most of them were pigs, trashing rooms, throwing TV sets through windows, throwing their managers through windows, driving over people, killing people, switchblade knife enthusiasts, druggies. They were all fuckin mental. We were into the hippy thing then, so everybody was smoking dope. If you didn’t have a stash or a joint in your hand then fuck you. Then I met this black guy, who’s very calm and very quiet and very funny and we hit it off and I started shooting him.

    What was your first assignment with him?

    His record cover in March 1967, Are You Experienced? I’m sending that to a gallery in San Francisco this week. No one has ever seen this picture before. It’s a huge Irish print- about 16 x 16 on water color paper. They’re gonna ask something like $2,200 for it.

    Tell me about Hendrix.

    He was terrific. This is the amazing thing. When I first met him he was so calm and quiet. If he didn’t understand you, he’d say, ‘Pardon me.’ Then I went to one of his concerts. I couldn’t believe it. He was Jekyll and Hyde. He was so quiet off stage, so nice and kind and responsive and then he got on stage and the sheer power of his personality and his playing ability hit you like a ton of bricks. It was like standing in front of the sun without any clothes on, on a hot day. It just blew your fucking mind and I realized the power of him. He had this massive, massive power. It was kind of hypnotic, and he had a fantastic way of playing. He was into art and destruction. There was an anger in the playing, not in his personality or when you talked to him, but anger in the playing. A powerhouse anger against being black and being put down by whites and against war. He hated war and he hated violence and he became an artist who essentially was very avant-garde. He was a brilliant player. A lot of guitarists used to go and watch him, but still couldn’t figure out how he did things, ‘cause he was so amazing with his fingers. He was an amazing player, plus he was left handed which was crazy. One day I was with him on a recording session and a guy was trying to play something and Jimi said, ‘No, no like this’ and he took the guy’s guitar put it upside down and played it upside down. He played it better upside down than the guy could play it. He was one of the world’s greatest guitar players.

    What was he interested in, when he got to England? How did he perceive England as opposed to America?

    We were in the underground so he never really saw too much of above ground. I think he knew there was a class system and he was aware of that. But he was a musician. He was only really interested in music. He liked girls, he liked drinking, he liked drugs, we all did, but his primary interest was music, he loved it. Chas told me that when he brought him over from the states, Jimi just lived with Chas in a little flat, nothing special. Chas said that he used to get up in the morning, put the guitar around his neck, start playing, walk over to the coffee maker and make some coffee. Or he would go in the bathroom, sit down and have a shit and be playing in the toilet. This was a guy who was serious about playing.

    WHEN JIMI CAME IN, THEY YELLED, “JIMI! JIMI!” AND THEN USHERED US INTO A SIDE ROOM. THEY HAD A BIG SIDEBOARD WHERE YOU LAY FOOD OUT AND THERE WAS EVERY KIND OF DRUG YOU COULD THINK OF: HEROIN, KEIF, HASH, YOU NAME IT, IT WAS ALL THERE. WE STOOD IN FRONT OF THIS AND THEN I REALIZED THAT YOU DIDN’T INVITE JIMI ANYWHERE WITHOUT HAVING A LOAD OF DRUGS. SO, EVEN IF HE WANTED TO NOT TAKE DRUGS, IT WASN’T POSSIBLE.”

    Last edited by RobbieRadio; 08-05-14 at 06:57 AM.

  28. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to RobbieRadio For This Useful Post:


  29. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,298
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 3,754 Times in 1,001 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    BOB DYLAN

    Though stories differ, he met Dylan at least once, but any interactions were by all accounts inconsequential. In that same Rolling Stone interview, Hendrix reported “I only met him once, about three years ago, back at the Kettle of Fish [a folk-rock era hangout] on MacDougal Street. That was before I went to England. I think both of us were pretty drunk at the time, so he probably doesn’t remember it.”


    For his part, Dylan recalls another meeting, equally inauspicious. “First time I saw him, he was playing with John Hammond,” he wrote in the liner notes to career retrospective Biograph. “He was incredible then. I’d already been to England and beyond, and although he didn’t sing, I kinda had a feeling that he figured into things. The last time I saw him was a couple of months before he died. He was in that band with Buddy Miles. It was an eerie scene. He was slouched down in the back of a limousine. I was riding by on a bicycle. I remember saying something about that song ‘Wind Cried Mary,’ it was a long way from playing behind John Hammond. That was my favorite song of his – that and ‘Dolly Dagger’… I don’t know, it was strange, both of us were a little lost for words, he’d gone through like a fireball without knowing it, I’d done the same thing like being shot out of cannon.”


    Deering Howe



    Perhaps the best story – though one confirmed by neither party – was told by friend Deering Howe in Charles Cross’s biography Room Full of Mirrors. Cross writes:
    One day that fall [Howe] was walking down Eighth Street in New York City with Jimi when they spied a figure on the other side of the road. “Hey, that’s Dylan,” Jimi said excitedly. “I’ve never met him before; let’s go talk to him.” Jimi darted into traffic, yelling “Hey, Bob” as he approached. Deering followed, though he felt uneasy about Jimi’s zeal. “I think Dylan was a little concerned at first, hearing someone shouting his name and racing across the street toward him,” Deering recalled. Once Dylan recognized Jimi, he relaxed. Hendrix’s introduction was modest enough to be comic. “Bob, uh, I’m a singer, you know, called, uh, Jimi Hendrix and…” Dylan said he knew who Jimi was and loved his covers of “All Along the Watchtower” and “Like a Rolling Stone.” “I don’t know if anyone has done my songs better,” Dylan said. Dylan hurried off, but left Jimi beaming. “Jimi was on cloud nine,” Deering said, “if only because Bob Dylan knew who he was. It seemed very clear to me that the two had never met before.”


    The Story Behind Hendrix's "All Along The Watchtower"

    Link: http://www.covermesongs.com/2014/03/...atchtower.html

  30. The Following User Says Thank You to RobbieRadio For This Useful Post:


  31. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    19
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    I wanna believe this story, but there is a lack of time/dates here....Jimi did own a blue 1968 Corvette that he bought while touring, in Ohio--but he had no time to enjoy it, so he had a roadie take it to NY for temporary storage....after he had a break from touring in October of 1968, he settled into that rental house in Benedict Canyon and did arrange for his blue Corvette to be driven cross-country so he could use it...however, he piled up the car very quickly!...and then bought another Corvette while in L.A....it was not blue....this Corvette can be seen being driven by Jimi in one of those home movies that were taken by Jimi and others...and eventually this car, after having been painted a special silver metal-flake color at Jimi's request, was eventually driven back to NY for Jimi's use...see Univibes for more on this....anyway, the claim that Jimi was waiting in his "blue Corvette" for Mr. Shady in NY doesn't seem to fit the time sequence.....finally, was Hendrix hanging out in L.A. "a couple to three weeks" prior to his death? not likely...Like I said, I wanna believe this story, but more timeline is needed..

  32. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    3,761
    Thanks
    1,732
    Thanked 2,148 Times in 657 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    Quote Originally Posted by Zippy View Post
    finally, was Hendrix hanging out in L.A. "a couple to three weeks" prior to his death? not likely...Like I said, I wanna believe this story, but more timeline is needed..
    see posts #7 and #8

  33. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    19
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts

    Re: Jesse Ed Davis Remembers Jimi 1975

    I checked Jimi's itinerary for July, August and September of 1970....the last time he was in SoCal was for the San Diego Sports Arena concert on 25 July (I attended this one!)...immediately prior to this, Jimi was recording at Electric Lady in NY....after this, he went to Seattle for his concert on the 26th--and then, went directly to Hawaii, where he spent nearly three weeks, doing the concerts we are all familiar with....it seems possible then, since I cannot find exactly when Jimi left Hawaii, that he may have stopped over for a few days in Laurel Canyon....at any rate, his next verified stop was Electric Lady back in NY on the 22nd of August....if indeed Jimi briefly stopped over in LA during this time period, then Mr. Shady's story could be true...he just might be a couple weeks off on his recollection of how soon Jimi died after he saw him....as Jimi once did sing--"Who knows?"

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBitty (VBTT) 4 for XBT v1.1 CUSTOM by Toolmanwill