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Thread: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

  1. #21
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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    I always found the mag too expensive and have never been a subscriber. However, the inspiration for my website was Caesar's contributions in the 70s and 80s for NME and Melody Maker and thank God he and his collaborators were there to sort it all out. When I passed on his request for info, I didn't know there was any issue about his activities here.

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    For the record, I'm a huge Caesar Glebbeek fan. I love his magazine, the cost doesn't bother me, seems worth it to me.
    I like his attention to detail and always trying to get it right. Mostly, I like the information and photos he uncovers.
    I've subscribed since the early 90's and I always look forward to the next issue. I wish he would publish them more often like the old days.

    Others on this board may not find his publication(s) that useful because they have other sources, etc......or they are the experts and they are the source.
    Me, I'm just a common Hendrix schlepper.
    Also, I am not aware of various issues with who uncovered what, and who gets credit for what, and who's trying to shut who down.
    If I was aware, maybe I'd get mad at somebody......I guess I'd just as soon not know. Ignorance can be bliss.

    For another record, I love CTT just as much as Univibes and literally everybody on it. As long as I wouldn't have to be stuck on a deserted island with some of you.
    Peace,
    Souldog

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Update.
    Now seeking to contact:

    * Joel Medwik and Court Rodgers (co-owners of Ambassador Theatre)

    * Andy Goldberg (local piano player)
    * Anyone who witnessed Jimi's burning act during the JHE show on Saturday,12 August 1967 (second show that night) at the Ambassador Theatre
    * Anyone who took photographs of the JHE at the Ambassador Theatre – note: there were 10 (or possibly even 11) shows in total – between 9 and 13 August 1967.

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Quote Originally Posted by purple jim View Post


    * Joel Medwik and Court Rodgers (co-owners of Ambassador Theatre)

    According to Wikipedia and other sites, there were actually 3 co-owners.
    Check the spelling too, might help.

    [....In 1967 Tony Finestra, Court Rodgers and Joel Mednick were three young guys selling fire extinguishers of all things when they heard about the Summer of Love out in San Francisco..... ]

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Jimi Hendrix Chicken Attack: Washington Hilton 1968-03-10

    http://www.coolcleveland.com/wiki/Ne...BellamyHendrix

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Bobby Womack claims Jimi burned guitars when he played with Gorgeous George.

    Vintage Guitar Magazine January 2002


    When did you meet Jimi Hendrix?

    In the early ’60s. I was playin’ with Sam Cooke at the time and I was also opening the show with my brothers, The Valentinos. Jimi was playing guitar for a guy named Gorgeous George O’Dell.

    George would come out and open the show, and I remember Jimi would always steal the show. Blacks thought he was crazy! They use to call him a beatnick – this is before hippie. They’d say, “Man, this boy is weird.” Especially when he took out the lighter fluid and set his guitar on fire. He only had one guitar! So he’d run backstage, get a big ol’ blanket, and put it out.

    A lot of people believe Jimi Hendrix didn’t start setting his guitar on fire until after joining The Experience.

    No, no, no! I used to laugh at him because I thought his guitar looked like a piece of barbecue. George eventually gave it to me.

    Is it a Silvertone?

    I don’t know what it is – there’s no name on it, and he broke the head off. George said, “Jimi busted it up and tried to nail it back together for a gig.” George’s grandmother gave it to him – Jimi used to stay with her. I got it 25 or 30 years ago.

    Did you honestly like his playing?

    To be honest, what he was doing was foreign enough for me to say that he could never have played with James Brown. It wouldn’t work – he’d get fired. Plus, nobody could understand why a guy would love his guitar, then all of a sudden turn around and try to destroy it. He was just different.

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Quote Originally Posted by RobbieRadio View Post
    Bobby Womack claims Jimi burned guitars when he played with Gorgeous George.

    Vintage Guitar Magazine January 2002


    When did you meet Jimi Hendrix?

    In the early ’60s. I was playin’ with Sam Cooke at the time and I was also opening the show with my brothers, The Valentinos. Jimi was playing guitar for a guy named Gorgeous George O’Dell.

    George would come out and open the show, and I remember Jimi would always steal the show. Blacks thought he was crazy! They use to call him a beatnick – this is before hippie. They’d say, “Man, this boy is weird.” Especially when he took out the lighter fluid and set his guitar on fire. He only had one guitar! So he’d run backstage, get a big ol’ blanket, and put it out.

    A lot of people believe Jimi Hendrix didn’t start setting his guitar on fire until after joining The Experience.

    No, no, no! I used to laugh at him because I thought his guitar looked like a piece of barbecue. George eventually gave it to me.

    Is it a Silvertone?

    I don’t know what it is – there’s no name on it, and he broke the head off. George said, “Jimi busted it up and tried to nail it back together for a gig.” George’s grandmother gave it to him – Jimi used to stay with her. I got it 25 or 30 years ago.

    Did you honestly like his playing?

    To be honest, what he was doing was foreign enough for me to say that he could never have played with James Brown. It wouldn’t work – he’d get fired. Plus, nobody could understand why a guy would love his guitar, then all of a sudden turn around and try to destroy it. He was just different.
    Yeah, sure, he set fire to his guitar, when he could barely afford one and wasn't even allowed to wear anything other than band uniform and do the 'routine' or he would be fined. At that time he was little more than a valet with 'Georgeous' George (Odell George is/was his real name, not George O'Dell, George is his surname).
    Womack is the only person prior to the Walkers tour to claim this - and, of course, he has the very guitar

    Funny that because earlier he claimed his brother threw Jimi's guitar out the bus window when Jimi was asleep! Basically accusing Jimi of being a petty thief

    His main point appears to be ridiculing and insulting Hendrix.

    Jimi was anything but a 'beatnik' at that time, all photos from this time (and prior in Nashville) show him to be immaculately attired and quoffed.
    Last edited by stplsd; 06-12-13 at 11:25 AM.
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Jimi was hugely more successful, talented and also had an attractive personality (looks? ha-ha-ha). Womack has shown himself to be basically unpleasantly jealous and a cheap hustler (burnt guitar). Despite being a quite successful songwriter, as a musician he's really just a background guitar player, a minor performer and recording artist, as the record indisputably shows - in comparison to Jimi (and any artist that anyone actually listens to - especially after making the bad mistake of buying his records on speck thinking hey, great song, bet the original is better - NOT!!). The best thing that ever happened to him was the Rolling Stones (and disco, "Womack and Womack")
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Quote Originally Posted by purple jim View Post
    I got this circular from the big CG:

    Quiz Question: How many times did Jimi Hendrix burn a Stratocaster on stage?
    Correct Answer: Three times!
    Won't be the first time CG's been over enthusiastic to defend the furthest extent of a casual Jimi comment, "2 or 3 times" (ie twice. CG, "It must mean thrice, ooh Jimi burning a guitar more than twice, I was sooooo, disappointed when I found out Miami was bollocks, but now!!! with a slight bit of evidence, mmmm, cough, it might be. "They" (ever smaller) will cough up for this "exclusive"."
    The most untestified gigs and by far the longest time he played one venue with Noel & Mitch. Bizarrely there is almost no info as to what went on, apart from Mitch had allegedly suffered "appendicitis" and was replaced for some time by a drummer that no one can remember anything about! ha-ha-ha! My bet is it was just trying to grab some attention in the tiny press they had, entirety of, as far as I can see was, "KRLA mag", and there was nothing wrong with Mitch?

    40 odd years later, many years after several, much earlier witnesses', including later celebs stated they never heard of this burning. Others, alleged audience members, now, after being heavily prompted, before their rapidly approaching meeting with death, they suddenly remember, "Jimi burnt his guitar", yeah but was it the movie or in the Ambassador theater? Funny the press, in attendance (they reported at least one show) and always interested in a "story" (the Capitol) never noticed or heard?
    It's like Bill Wyman "remembering" Jimi burning his guitar in a tiny club that was well attended by the press who never mentioned this outrageous and dangerous act in the circumstances.
    His return visit to his home state was covered by the local press. National press seems to have been uninterested.
    If it turns out after this ocean of time there is compelling evidence, great
    Last edited by stplsd; 06-14-13 at 08:35 AM.
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Jimi Hendricks ExperienceAttachment 20937
    When Jimi Hendrix came to Washington and blew its mind
    :


    http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifest...4ef_story.html

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Quote Originally Posted by stplsd View Post
    If it turns out after this ocean of time there is compelling evidence, great
    A photo would be compelling evidence! :-)

    The story about the drummer is in the link from the Washington Post. Seems more credible than the guitar burning act.

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Pete Townshend Rolling Stone Magazine 2010

    The third or fourth time that I saw him, he was supporting the Who at the Saville Theatre. That was the first time I saw him set his guitar on fire. It didn't do very much. He poured lighter fluid over the guitar and set fire to it, and then the next day he would be playing with a guitar that was a little bit charred. In fact, I remember teasing him, saying, "That's not good enough — you need a proper flamethrower, it needs to be completely destroyed." We started getting into an argument about destroying your guitar — if you're going to do it, you have to do it properly. You have to break every little piece of the guitar, and then you have to give it away so it can't be rebuilt. Only that is proper breaking your guitar. He was looking at me like I was fucking mad.



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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    ^Thanks Robbie. Do we know what the date of that gig might have been?

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Quote Originally Posted by purple jim View Post
    ^Thanks Robbie. Do we know what the date of that gig might have been?
    No date mentioned in the RS article.

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    ARCHIV

    SMASHING THE GUITAR

    O32 Magazine | Summer 2001




    On the artist GUSTAV METZGER, the idea of the auto-destructive artwork and its implications for rock music.
    By WOLFGANG KRAUSHAAR
    A CONFLICT AT THE MONTEREY FESTIVAL (1967)
    June 18, 1967, Monterey, California. A bitter argument between two rock bands breaks out backstage at the first big open air concert. The point of contention: who will appear after whom. The Who don’t want to go onstage after the Jimi Hendrix Experience and vice versa. Neither of the two heads of each band, Hendrix and Pete Townsend, will budge. But it’s not vanity that has each holding his ground. Both bands plan a final climax to their acts, a grand finale that can’t be topped for sheer drama: they want to smash their own instruments into their equipment. Obviously, the same act can’t be repeated in front of the same audience twice.
    To finally put an end to the standoff, John Philips of the Mamas and the Papas takes out a coin. Hendrix loses, but nevertheless swears to pull out all the stops, a promise that is to lead to one of the most bizarre and talked about performances in the history of rock music.
    The Who go on first. As planned, they leave their equipment in shambles on stage. The audience goes nuts. But they have no idea what’s coming their way next.



    The guitar that Hendrix smashed at The Saville Theatre in front of Paul McCartney, amongst many others.






    Rolling Stones guitarist Brian Jones introduces Jimi Hendrix who walks on in red silk pants, a billowy, fringed shirt, a feather boa and an Afro worthy of a diva. Most of the people in the crowd are from Haight Ashbury, Ground Zero of San Francisco’s hippie scene. As promised, Hendrix pulls out all the stops. With even more virtuosity than usual, he plays “Hey Joe,” “Foxy Lady,” “Can You See Me?” and the elegiac “The Wind Cries Mary.” He’s got the audience under his thumb. Mama Cass and Janis Joplin are thoroughly enchanted. Then Hendrix pulls off his feather boa and launches into “Wild Thing”, his last piece. He works his Fender Stratocaster with his arm, his teeth and his tongue, he plays on his back, under his knees, he rides his guitar across the stage and does somersaults with it. Then he violently thrashes the amplifier and, at the same time, simulates a sexual act. finally, he rams the neck of the guitar into one of the speakers, pulls it back out again and throws the smashed instrument to the stage floor. The other two musicians accompanying him, Noel Redding on bass and Mitch Mitchell on drums, keep on playing. Hendrix kneels down in front of his guitar, squirts lighter fluid on it and sets it on fire. The flames shoot up as Hendrix grabs the guitar by the neck and pounds the burning instrument on the stage. As the sound collage of what’s left of the song disintegrates, he tosses the remains of the guitar out to the crowd.
    The audience is in shock. The initial enthusiasm has turned to dismay. Most of the crowd simply stares ahead in a daze as if they can’t fathom what’s just taken place. After a few moments, a hesitant applause breaks out. As the band leaves the stage, one tumultuous scene follows another. Nico, the Velvet Underground singer from Germany, rushes over to Hendrix and smothers him in kisses. Approving comments are heard from the murmuring throng of concert organizers, technicians, the press, fans and other musicians.
    No one could have realized that this performance was, among other things, an allegory for the meteoric rise and fall of a megastar. Jimi Hendrix was to become an absolutely unique icon in the history of rock and came onto the scene just as it was beginning its hero-making, self-destructive phase. The next day, the Los Angeles Times wrote that when the black singer and guitarist left the stage in Monterey, a rumor had become a legend. The realization was beginning to sink in that the magnificent virtuosity of the guitar playing, the movement of the body that itself bordered on artistic expression, the patterns of sounds arising from alienating echo and feedback effects and the staged orgies of destruction were a direct attack on the harmonic sweetness of pop music. Hendrix, an American, first began his career as an extraordinary musician in the innovative music scene of London, blending elements of blues, rock and jazz in entirely new ways. Discovered in New York by the ex-Yardbird Chas Chandler, he had, within just a few weeks, forged his own style and, with his furious riffs, caught the attention of the most talented of the British guitarists such as Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton and Pete Townsend. Most of their reactions were similar to that of Mike Bloomfield, a young and eager American guitarist. Bloomfield compared his first experience of a Hendrix concert to an encounter with an extraterrestrial being: “Hydrogen bombs exploded, remotely guided missiles shot through the air. I can’t even begin to describe the sounds he got out of his instrument … It hit me in the face and I didn’t even want to touch a guitar again for a year.” The sheer outlandishness of the metaphors hint at how violent, explosive and threatening the Hendrix sound seemed to audiences and especially many of his fellow guitarists.
    When, at Woodstock in August 1969, Hendrix deconstructed “The Star-Spangled Banner,” the US national anthem, turning it into a countercultural complaint with unmistakable elegiac and melancholic undertones, he once again reached for the motif of destruction and integrated it into what is surely his most notable instrumental work. This time it wasn’t just the guitar that was destroyed but also one of the most important of national emblems, an unequivocal protest against the war in Vietnam. For all the obvious virtuosity, the name Hendrix is inseparable in rock history from the drive for destruction. The audio-visually shocking performance at Monterey, which many requested to see repeated, often without success, had become a sensational image of the rock idol lodged permanently in the minds of many. His “Smash Hits”, the title of one of his albums, were associated with an image that propagated a set of rock music clichés dominated by psychedelic effects, orgies of destruction and vandalism. But it wasn’t Jimi Hendrix who introduced rock to the smashing of the guitar. It was his rival at Monterey.
    TOWNSEND’S INSPIRATION
    Like more than a few other accomplished British rock musicians, Pete Townsend began his career at an art academy. He was especially interested in the avant-garde and it was anything but a coincidence that, in December 1962, he attended a lecture at the Ealing School of Art entitled “Auto-Destructive Art, Auto-Creative Art: The Struggle or the Machine Arts of the Future”. The speaker was an artist known only to a few small circles.
    Fifty slides were shown and elaborated on. One made quite an impression on the young art student. It depicted an action by a Japanese artist, Saburo Murakami, a member of the Gutai Group, founded in 1954 in Osaka. The slide showed Murakami, his arm outstretched, his hand balled up in a fist, jumping through a paper wall.
    The pose struck Townsend. There would be few appearances by The Who later on that would not feature Townsend bopping around on stage with his arm raised. This dramatic mannerism would become one of the trademarks of the eccentric band from the mod scene.
    There are several legends surrounding the origins and eventual development of that moment in Who performances when the instruments would be smashed. One of them goes like this: “While they were performing at the Marquee, the neck of Townsend’s guitar broke against the low ceiling when he jumped. It didn’t seem to matter much to the audience, and this infuriated Townsend, so he smashed the damaged instrument to pieces.
    Excited, Keith Moon knocked over his drum kit and started mutilating it. The crowd liked this quite a bit; the reaction was overwhelming, and the famous Who stage show was born.” Townsend himself tells quite a different story. In an interview, he refers to the lecture at the Ealing School of Art and explains: “I was doing my first gig with The Who and took it as an excuse to smash my new Rickenbaker that I had just hocked myself to the eyebrows to buy. I really believed it was my responsibility to start a rock band that would last only three months, an auto-destructive group. The Who would have been the first punk band except that we had a hit.” Afterwards, it wasn’t destruction but auto-destruction that was the overriding motif. The Who was a band with a sell-by date built into its conception. The influence of the idea of an auto-destructive art work on Townsend is clear; it must have seemed an exemplary concept on which to found a genuine rock band of his time.
    METZGER’S IDEA OF AUTO-DESTRUCTIVE ART
    The inspiration for Townsend’s deconstruction scenarios was the artist Gustav Metzger, thirty-six years old at the time, a German-Jewish immigrant who had lost most of his relatives at Auschwitz and other concentration camps. Metzger, to whom the Who guitarist would repeatedly refer as his “teacher”, had made a name for himself particularly with a number of manifestos on auto-destructive art. It’s not just in Britain that he is now known as a founder of this seemingly paradoxical concept. In his first published manifesto, “Auto-destructive Art”, dated November 4, 1959, he wrote: “Self-destructive painting, sculpture, and construction is a total unity of idea, site, form, colour, method, and timing of the disintegrative process… Auto-destructive paintings, sculptures and constructions have a life-time varying from a few moments to twenty years. Total conception: When the disintegrative process is complete, the work is to be removed from the site and scrapped.”



    Gustav Metzger , Historic photographs no. 1 "Liquidation of the Warsaw Ghetto". B&W photograph and Rubble, image courtesy of the artist, copyright J.Hardman Jones







    Metzger thought it was important to show such art works in public spaces and, whenever possible, outdoors. The idea of the isolated artist working in his studio was for him sheer horror.
    Anyone should be able to have access to the art work without having to pay for it. The art work must not be allowed to become an object for the market; it cannot be bought or sold. Metzger would later emphasize again and again that, for him, November 4, 1959, was a point of no return. Since that day, he never ceased thinking about the idea of auto-destructive art. Just a few months later, he presented his second manifesto. Published on March 10, 1960, the “Manifesto Auto-Destructive Art” explicitly addressed the nuclear arms race: “Auto-destructive art reenacts the obsession with destruction, the pummeling to which individuals and masses are subjected. Auto-destructive art demonstrates man’s power to accelerate disintegrative processes of nature and to order them. Auto-destructive art mirrors the compulsive perfectionism of arm manufacture-polishing to destruction point. Auto-destructive art is the transformation of technology into public art… Auto-destructive art is art which contains within itself an agent which automatically leads to its destruction within a period of time not to exceed twenty years.” At the end of his manifesto, he lists materials and techniques to be used in the production of auto-destructive art. five days later, the Daily Express published Metzger’s first model of an auto-destructive sculpture. On June 22, 1960, he made his first presentation in the Temple Gallery in London. With a brush, he painted a web of nylon which shortly disintegrated before the eyes of the audience. He associated his auto-destructive act with an “aesthetic of disgust”.
    The demonstration that sparked the most public reaction took place on July 3, 1961, at the South Bank in London. Wearing a gas mask, he sprayed hydrochloric acid on three nylon screens of black, red and white, stretched over a construction of metal pipes. Bit by bit, the material dissolved, falling in strips before it had disintegrated completely. The entire action didn’t take longer than half an hour.
    Just a few days before, Metzger had published his third manifesto, “Auto-Destructive Art, Machine Art, Auto-Creative Art.” As the title implies, for the first time, he explicitly establishes a relationship between auto-destructive and auto-creative art. The goal is to create works of art with the help of a computer. The movements of these works would be programmable and self-guiding. He closed with a formulation of his political credo: “Auto-destructive art is an attack on capitalist values and the drive to nuclear annihilation.”
    On October 7, 1962, during the Cuba Missile Crisis, he presented his fourth manifesto entitled “Manifesto World”. It begins with the darkly apocalyptic words, “everything everything everything everything a world on the edge of destruction. Objects become valuable and material honorable. That is an art form for artists. The masses recognize modern art fifty years after it is created. The art form won’t survive any such delay since it’s not likely that in fifty years there will be a world in which to practice it.” A fifth manifesto on “Material and Decay” attempted to address more precisely the role of the activity of decay in the auto-destructive process. It appeared on July 30, 1964, and was the last in Metzger’s series.
    ...

    THE REDISCOVERY
    Pulling himself out of the London scene during the eighties, Metzger was slowly forgotten. But then, in 1993, the Barbican Art Gallery in London opened its exhibition “The Sixties: Art Scene in London.” Included were documents related to the development of auto-destructive art. At the same time, some of the “Young British Artists” took an increasing interest in the progenitors of the art of destruction and saw in them something of a model for their own work. A few of the YBAs, led by Damien Hirst, openly declared Metzger their “Dad”.
    In a portrait, the journalist Nicola Kuhn writes admiringly: “The small, almost gnome-like man remains a phenomenon. For decades, no one’s asked after him; ‘whereabouts of the artist unknown’ is what’s always written in the catalogs. But suddenly, as in the sixties, he’s enjoying cult status again, invited to speak, even exhibiting art again. The retrospective at the Oxford Museum of Modern Art signals the return of the artist who remains elusive to the end. The recreation of formerly developed works is less a belated attempt at jump-starting a career than a tribute to the current generation who have found an interest in the die-hard world reformer and his early work.”
    THE ROCK MUSEUM IN SEATTLE
    June 23, 2000. Seattle, a port city in the state of Washington near the Canadian border. A big pop concert opens the “Experience Music Project,” a unique rock museum with more than 13,000 square meters of exhibition space. The idea for the project comes from the forty-seven-year-old computer millionaire Paul Allen who had left Microsoft years before. Guided by his fanaticism for music and his technical know-how, he has put his personal stamp on the museum. Architect Frank Gehry has given the steel building the shape of a shattered electric guitar. The design is in homage to Jimi Hendrix, who died in 1970 as the most famous son of the city next to Bill Gates. Noting that the museum is an architectural example of the art of destruction rings true in two ways.
    There are over 80,000 objects collected here, from Bob Dylan’s harmonica to Janis Joplin’s feather boa to the demolished fragments of the Fender Stratocaster smashed by Jimi Hendrix on June 4, 1967, during his appearance at the Seville Theater in London. Allen’s original plan to create a sort of electronic mausoleum for Hendrix alone proved unfeasible because of the lack of cooperation on the part of Hendrix’s heirs. Gustav Metzger is not known to have made a comment on the gigantic shrine to pop music. But it would hardly be a surprise to hear from him that a misunderstanding has occurred at some point in the formulation of the idea for the building. He might argue that in the form of the smashed guitar, the difference between destruction and auto-destruction has not been realized. The self-destruction of an art work is at the same time a creative process. Smashing an instrument, on the other hand, is not art in any direct or indirect sense. His idea of the auto-destructive work of art can therefore have nothing to do with a building shaped like a frozen torso of an electric guitar.
    Wolfgang Kraushaar /032c.com

    http://wolfgang-kraushaar.com/smashingtheguitar/

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Jimi and EC at the London Polytechnique
    by Betsy Fowler

    "I was present at the Central London Poly gig where EC first heard Jimi. EC was living in my flat at the time. After Jimi's pyrotechnical performance (?!), EC was absolutely *DEFLATED* emotionally and uncharacteristically left the gig in a taxi with me and another roommate. During the ten-minute ride back to our flat he LAY ON THE FLOOR OF THE TAXI and literally MOANED in MISERY. He thought his career was over! We tried to comfort him--we were unimpressed with the musicality of Jimi's playing even though we were amused by his fabulous tricks. He refused to be comforted. All this goes to show how competitive EC was at that time."

    http://gpatt.customer.netspace.net.a...ff/ecjhgtr.htm


    Hendrix jams with Cream

    1 October 1966
    In 1966 Eric Clapton was the undisputed king of rock guitar in Britain. That was until Hendrix turned up on the scene. Jimi had only been in England for a week, yet there was already talk of this amazing American guitarist who had been creating a storm in London's blues clubs.
    In a particularly over confident gesture Hendrix asked if he could jam with Cream at their gig at Central London Polytechnic. Hendrix took the stage and tore through a version of 'Killing Floor' in double time. Cream soon regretted allowing him to join them. Hendrix's outrageous stage antics and dazzling guitar playing caused Clapton to leave the stage in a state of shock. He asked Chas Chandler afterwards "Is he always that f***ing good?"


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/sevenages...ms-with-cream/

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  28. #37
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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Attachment 21753
    88 Ambassador Theater Photos Auctioned By Christie's

    http://www.artfact.com/auction-lot/j...5-c-a1a5fcaa80

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  30. #38
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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Quote Originally Posted by Ezy Rider View Post
    Rolling Stones guitarist Brian Jones introduces Jimi Hendrix who walks on in red silk pants, a billowy, fringed shirt, a feather boa and an Afro worthy of a diva. Most of the people in the crowd are from Haight Ashbury, Ground Zero of San Francisco’s hippie scene.
    His trousers were not silk they were velvet (part of a suit), his shirt was not "fringed" or "billowy" it was ruffled, anyway, when he "walked on" he was wearing a jacket over it (it was silk - hand-painted by, Mick's brother, Chris Jagger), he still had his processed 'Bob Dylan '66' at this time, not an 'Afro' - there was no such thing at the time. Most people there were not penniless hippies from the Haight - 'most' could not afford to get there, the audience was from all over, even UK, most looked 'straight' many even 'totally square'.
    Last edited by stplsd; 12-27-13 at 03:39 AM.
    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research


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  33. #40
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    Re: Ambassador Theatre - 12 August 1967 - Univibes research

    Click on johanincr's link above for the TV news story


    Last edited by RobbieRadio; 10-14-17 at 03:32 PM.

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